South Carolina Public Radio News

Map: SC Revenue and Fiscal Affairs

Next week state officials expect the U.S. Census Bureau to officially estimate that the state’s population has passed the five million mark.  In fact, they believe the state reached that milestone back on June 8th.  Officials estimate that the state is growing by 157 people a day making it one of the fastest growing states in the country.  And it’s growing really fast.  It took 67 years for the state to grow by a million people, from one million to two million. It took just 17 years though to grow from four million to five million people.

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USC Retail Department Chair Mark Rosenbaum is excited by this year’s holiday shopping season.  A decade after the great recession that started in 2008, he said retail sales in the state and nation are back to 2007 levels.  The stock market’s record highs are just in time for retail and for consumer confidence, he said. 

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Tigers are rapidly disappearing in nature because of poaching and habitat destruction, according to Dr. Brett Wright, dean of Clemson University’s College of Behavioral, Social and Health Sciences.  In 2010 there were an estimated 3200 tigers still roaming India and other Asian countries.   This alarming figure caused Clemson to contact the other major "tiger mascot" universities – Auburn, LSU and Missouri – and form the U.S. Tiger University Consortium to help increase the number of tigers in the wild. 

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It's no secret that we've had a rough fall and winter with natural disasters. Even as we write this, fires burn in Southern California, adding to the previous wildfires in the northern part of the state that burned over 245,000 acres in October.

Hurricanes Irma and Harvey devastated communities across Florida and Texas, while touching communities in Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee, the Carolinas and Louisiana.

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Years back we were showering off outside after swimming at Pawley’s Island,   right under a palmetto tree that was in full flower and swarming with honey bees, so much so that the kids were unreasonably afraid of getting stung. Now I’ve found that one of the most popular varietal honeys in our part of the world comes from European honey bees visiting Sabal palmetto, or cabbage palmetto, our state tree.   The honey that comes from these flowers is light in color and somewhat thin.

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Winter Heating

7 hours ago

As the weather gets colder, you can really start to feel the pinch of heating your home when you receive that monthly power bill!  But your heating system, and the way you use it account for a lot of that bill.  Before you upgrade your system, improve the efficiency of your house- this will allow you to purchase a smaller unit and save you money on the upgrades.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"W" is for Wannamaker, John Edward [1851-1935]. Agriculturalist. Civic Leader. Educated at home by private tutors, Wannamaker graduated from Wofford in 1872. After college, he assumed management of his father's farming interests. Keenly interested in agricultural improvement, he applied his considerable resources to agrarian research and innovation. In the 1930s he experimented with soybeans, seeking to develop a seed stock suitable to South Carolina soils and climate.

Our next guest’s Germany-based company has been so successful with their only US manufacturing operations being located in our state, that they recently opened a brand new $30 million R&D facility and production plant.

Mike Switzer interviews Fabian Grimm, the US managing director for Mankiewicz Coatings in Charleston, SC.

President Trump, minutes before heading to speak at the FBI's National Academy, lashed out at the bureau, saying "it's a shame what's happened with the FBI" and claiming there are "a lot of very angry people that are seeing it."

The Army's Green Berets have gained a reputation over the decades for their toughness and fighting skills. They served with local forces in Vietnam, and in recent years, they've deployed repeatedly to Iraq and Afghanistan. The list of their deployments continues to grow: Niger. Somalia. Yemen. Syria. Philippines.

Now a fight appears to be growing inside the Green Beret community.

With lawmakers in the House and Senate announcing that they've reached a deal, affordable housing advocates are anxiously waiting to see which version of the bill wins out with regard to housing. They say the House bill has a poison pill in it.

"The effect would be devastating," says Diane Yentel, president of the National Low Income Housing Coalition. "It would mean a loss of around 800,000 affordable rental homes over the next 10 years."

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News and Features from APM and PRI

Today is the last day to enroll in Obamacare insurance plans. Earlier this year, the Trump administration slashed the Affordable Care Act advertising budget by $90 million, so many people assumed there would be far fewer TV ads encouraging people to sign up. But it turns out there’s been 51 percent more insurance commercials compared to a similar time last year. So what’s going on?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Want to build social capital? Throw a dinner party.

2 hours ago

Marketplace's David Brancaccio spoke to Rico Gagliano and Brendan Francis Newnam about their book "Brunch Is Hell: How to Save the World by Throwing a Dinner Party," and their rules for creating the best dinner party. 

Click the above audio player to hear the full story.

 

Alejandra Hilbert is spending a Saturday morning in November applying for CalFresh, the California program that used to be called “food stamps.” She is one of 8,000 students at the University of California, Berkeley who have been notified that they may be eligible for government assistance of up to $192 each month to help pay for groceries.

For most people, the top of the mine shaft at the Prosper-Haniel coal mine in Bottrop, Germany, just looks like a big black hole. But Andre Niemann looked into that hole and saw the future.

Part 1: No regrets from this soon-to-be-ex-miner

George Lampman is a veteran of the Korean War, but he didn't get through it alone.

George first arrived in Seoul as a 21-year-old Marine, part of a security detachment at the US Embassy. It was 1949.

He vividly remembers meeting Lee Sook Ei, a switchboard operator at the embassy.

“She was a beautiful girl [and] very, very intelligent,” George says.

He tried to ask Sook Ei out more than once, but he struck out.  

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Recovery

Stories of people and communities going about the work of recovery from the floods of 2015.

Piano Jazz

Jazz legend Marian McPartland hosted Piano Jazz for over 30 years. The show continues showcasing the top musicians of all time with broadcasts and podcasts from the archives.
A two-decade, joint effort between South Carolina and North Carolina has sought to correct errors that began with the first survey, made in 1735!

Get weekly program highlights via e-mail.

How did the piano get its name? Why can’t you "reach" a crescendo? Who invented opera—and why? Answers to countless classical music questions from Miles Hoffman.

S.C. Public Radio Offers HD Programming in Charleston

Both Classical and News Programming Available.

SC Public Radio and SCETV Content Whenever, Wherever You Want it

On The South Carolina Business Review, Mike Switzer, focuses on news from the state's business community with interviews of small business owners and business leaders …

South Carolina Military and Veterans

Stories about South Carolina veterans, the history of the conflicts in which they served, and those on the home front.