Outside a Trump campaign rally in West Palm Beach, Fla., there was a cage holding a person dressed up like Hillary Clinton in a prison uniform. In the outrageous state of the 2016 campaign, it wasn't altogether shocking to see someone at a Trump event staging the visual stunt, after the "lock her up!" chants that punctuated Trump rallies.

But it's now known that this moment was set up by Russians.

You can buy a remarkable number of items on Copacabana Beach just by sitting on the sand a few yards from the Atlantic waves, and waiting.

Without leaving your beach chair, you can purchase a piece of cheese, a kiddie pool, a blanket, a skewer of shrimp, a string bikini, a selfie-stick, a tropical shirt, a pineapple or a coconut.

Be under no illusions: Copacabana is not merely a beach. It's a giant, restless market, staffed by vendors who drift around in steaming heat, flourishing their wares at the multitude of near-naked basking bodies.

This week in the Russia investigations: A major new indictment from the special counsel's office that charges thirteen individuals and three companies and shakes up the political rhetoric as new facts are revealed in the sprawling imbroglio.

Justice Department special counsel Robert Mueller prefers to let his work do the talking for him. On Friday, he delivered a stemwinder.

Earlier this week, we shared the remarkable story of Abby Beckley — and her run-in with eye worms.

When this young woman felt something crawling around in her eyes, she had the presence to remove said worm and then, over the course of a few weeks, not one, not two nor three ... but 14 nematodes came out from her eye.

At first doctors didn't believe her. Then they saw one squiggle across her eyeball.

During my senior year of high school, I started dreading calculus. Every time my teacher slapped our tests face-down on our desks, I would peel up the corner of the page just enough to see the score, circled in red. The numbers were dropping quickly: 79, 64, 56.

My classmates and I were not coy about our grades. After class, we would hover outside the door and compare them. But when my friends asked me what I got on tests, I said, childishly, "I'm not telling."

While Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School was on lockdown, with an active shooter in the building, students were on their phones.

By the time the first week wrapped up at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics, the powerful, icy winds that earlier disrupted or delayed competition had largely calmed. Norway's team led in medals, with 19, and Germany won more gold — nine medals — in the first week than any other country.

The U.S., meanwhile, earned eight medals by Friday, including five gold. Snowboarder Redmond "Red" Gerard, a 17-year-old who overslept on the day of his event and had to borrow a too-big jacket after he couldn't find his own, clinched Team USA's first gold medal last Sunday.

Native American leaders are once again pushing for a seat at the decision-making table, saying this week that tribal nations have been overlooked for "too often and too long."

Their latest concern comes with President Trump's proposed infrastructure plan. The president sent it to Congress on Monday, saying he aimed "to help build a better future for all Americans."

She went up the hill a snowboarder but came down an Olympic champion skier. That's one way to tell the story of Ester Ledecka, the Czech athlete who stunned the world — and herself — by winning the women's Super-G race at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics.

"How did that happen?" she asked a cameraman at the bottom of her run.

The angst of teenage life can be overwhelming. The angst of being an adult and watching teenagers — some of whom aren't old enough to vote in the U.S. — complete amazing feats of human strength and mental fortitude is ... well, also overwhelming. An impressive number of adolescents are not only competing in the 2018 Winter Games. In some cases, they're winning.

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News and Features from APM and PRI

No immigration bill as feds ink contract to monitor license plates

Feb 16, 2018

It was a busy week for immigration issues in Washington, DC — but it was also a busy week for immigration agents across the country who are stepping up arrests and finding new ways to track people.

This was supposed to be infrastructure week, remember? It turned out a little bit differently. Catherine Rampell of the Washington Post and Nela Richardson of Redfin joined us to talk about it. With the recent jobs report stirring fears of inflation, are we worrying too much about rising prices in the economy? Then: We're going to be borrowing a lot of money in this economy over the next eight to 10 years, yet White House advisers, including Council of Economic Advisers chair Kevin Hassett have basically said, "Deficits? Meh." We'll explain the fiscal flip-flop in the Republican Party.

What TV can teach the movie business about diversity

Feb 16, 2018

Tanya Saracho is the creator and showrunner of the Starz original scripted drama “Vida,” which centers around two Mexican-American sisters who return to east Los Angeles after their mother dies. While preparing to put the final touches to an episode with her editor, Saracho reflected on how all this was made possible, thanks to a meeting with Marta Fernandez, the senior vice president of Original Programming at the Starz network. “To have an executive who was Hispanic was amazing, ‘cause you don’t go into these meetings and see, you know, people like you,” she said.

Cherokee playwright Mary Kathryn Nagle is fighting for the rights of Native Americans both onstage and off. 

That emoji you just tweeted could determine the next ad you see

Feb 16, 2018

What do egglplant, fire and the number 100 all have in common? They're all emojis that have twisted and evolved in meaning.

As those little digital images change how we communicate, they've also transformed how advertisers track our interests.

Since 2016, Twitter has sold data of people’s emoji use to advertisers, allowing companies to send people specific ads based on the emojis they tweet.

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