WEPR-FM Transmission Interruption

Nov 5, 2017

Monday, November 13, through Friday, November 17, 2017, between the hours of 8:00 am and 5:00 pm,  WEPR-FM, Greenville, 90.1, will be periodically off the air because of work being done on the transmission tower.

Streaming will not be affected. We appreciate your patience.

Snake Handler Holds Rattlers and Records

Jul 25, 2008

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ALISON STEWART, host:

Open Mic: The 'BPP' Staff Says Goodbye

Jul 25, 2008

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German Left Courts the Working Class

Apr 23, 2008

A new political party in Germany has made saving the working class and the country's welfare system rallying points for attracting votes. It has been drawing support from the mainstream parties with a radical message.

The party, Die Linke, or the Left Party, is a merger of the reformed Communist Party from East Germany and discontented former Social Democrats. One of its co-leaders, Oskar Lafontaine, says that Germany shouldn't turn its back on working people just as they are increasingly struggling to make ends meet.

Dance Craze Tecktonik Spreads Through Europe

Mar 14, 2008

With the Macarena long past, a new European dance craze is set to invade U.S. shores.

The Tecktonik began just outside Paris — and is spreading to nightclubs and onto the streets across Europe.

At the Metropolis, one of the biggest nightclubs in the Paris region, the music goes by a lot of different names. Electro. Jump style. Hard style. Hard core. But the only dance is the Tecktonik.

The customers at the club are mostly in their teens and early 20s, middle class, and from every ethnic background. They look as if they were raised by Madonna and Marilyn Manson.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR News Special Coverage: Pentagon Briefing

Apr 1, 2003

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NPR News Special Coverage: Pentagon Briefing

Apr 1, 2003

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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News and Features from APM and PRI

Fijians speak from the front lines of climate change

33 minutes ago

Fiji is on the front lines of climate change, one of many tiny island nations that could be wiped out by rising seas and more intense storms. And to draw attention to the urgency of their plight, the country is presiding over this year’s global climate summit in Bonn, Germany.

We asked half a dozen Fijians about the threats to their country and their moment in the international spotlight.

Maria Nailevu:

(Markets Edition) With the House and Senate continuing to work out the details of their tax plans, we'll take a look at what their proposed cuts would mean in a tight labor market like this.

Gilles Soubeyran

On Monday, France marked the second anniversary of the attacks that killed 130 people in and around Paris two years ago. French president Emmanuel Macron and Anne Hidalgo, mayor of Paris, stopped at commemorative plaques in the places that were hit — a stadium, cafés and the Bataclan theater — where victims' names were read aloud.

But for some families across the country, more personal tributes were called for. And in the past year, a number of creative projects to honor the dead have emerged. 

Fifteen billion dollars a year. That’s about how much historically black colleges and universities contribute to the U.S. economy each year, according to a new study released today by the United Negro College Fund and conducted by the University of Georgia. As Marketplace’s Reema Khrais reports, it’s part of a bigger strategy to highlight the relevance of HBCUs today.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

At the United Nations climate talks in Germany, White House officials are talking about plans to make fossil fuels cleaner or more efficient, and to expand nuclear power, as approaches to reducing emissions. While the rest of the world may be more into discussing renewable energy, the focus of the current U.S. delegation would reduce carbon as well, as fossil fuels and nuclear are expected to remain a big part of the global energy mix.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

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