South Carolina Public Radio News

Newly planted seedlings grow near fully grown trees of various sizes at Mike McCartha's Christmas tree farm in Gilbert, S. C'
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

Mike McCartha and Bryan Price are tow two men who essentially make their entire year's livings in one month.  They're Christmas tree farmers.  It takes year-round to grow Christmas trees and successfully market them. Growers like McCartha and Price say they like seeing smiling faces returning year after year. 

Chris Pracht (right) during his 2017 induction into the National Auctioneers Association Hall  of Fame.
Courtesy of the National Auctioneers Association

Nationally-known auctioneer Chris Pracht of Anderson has run auctions in more than 30 states and three countries over his four-decade career.  His reputation among his peers is such that he was elected to the National Auctioneer’s Association Hall of Fame, one of only four South Carolinians to achieve the honor in the Association’s long history.

More than 75 organizations from across country attend Fort Jackson career fair.
Thelisha Eaddy/SC Public Radio

Before a service member transitions out of the military, the Department of Defense requires they complete a pre-separation counseling session. Fort Jackson's Solider For Life Transition Assistance program manager says its the beginning of 12-month period that prepares service members and their family for life outside the military.

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From NPR News this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

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Russia and Ukraine are holding large military exercises along their shared border as the Ukrainian military claims to be closing in on rebel strongholds in Donetsk and Luhansk, NPR's Karoun Demirjian reports from Moscow.

Government troops and separatists have been fighting for months for control of eastern Ukraine, Karoun says, and Ukrainian leaders say Russia has been supplying the separatists with weapons and strategic assistance — a charge Moscow denies.

Health Law Calls For Automatic Enrollment Of Some Workers

Aug 5, 2014

Newly hired employees who don't sign up for health insurance on the job could have it done for them under a health law provision that may take effect as early as next year.

So many nations are breaking up. Ukraine is in pieces. Moldova is teetering. Libya has no government to speak of. Sudan broke in two last year; now both sides are fighting. Yugoslavia is seven countries. Nigeria has a Christian/Muslim split. Syria has split so many ways it's barely there. Even Scotland is thinking of ditching Great Britain. With every break, we get new lines, new fences, new borders — further evidence of our failure to amalgamate, to get along.

The more borders we have, the more quarrels, the more wars. That's one way to think about borders — they're trouble.

Sometimes nature comes up with elegant solutions to difficult problems, like how to gain weight and not get diabetes.

Take, for instance, the grizzly bear. How does this 750-pound mammal survive long, lean winters? Well, it just gets really fat beforehand and then sleeps the hungry season away.

Grizzly bears can easily double their body fat in the months leading up to hibernation. For us humans, this kind of weight gain could result in some pretty serious health consequences — one of the most common being Type 2 diabetes.

Drug-Resistant Malaria Spreads Across Southeast Asia

Aug 5, 2014

Back in 2008, doctors in Cambodia made a worrisome discovery. They were having a hard time curing some people of malaria.

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News and Features from APM and PRI

The career website Glassdoor has released its annual list of the best places to work in the U.S. Over the last 10 years, the survey has ranked companies based on employee feedback anonymously submitted on the Glassdoor website.

(Markets Edition) Congress still needs to reach an agreement on a government spending bill. We'll hear from economist Diane Swonk, CEO of DS Economics, about how worried markets are about a potential shutdown, along with what we can expect from tomorrow's jobs report. Afterwards, we'll chat with the CEO of the career site Glassdoor about the best company to work for in 2018. Hint: It's a certain social media giant that's been in the spotlight this year over how it's handled the spread of "fake news."

Environmental Protection Agnecy head Scott Pruitt is scheduled to testify before Congress today. ((Thurs)) The oversight hearing before the House Energy and Commerce Committee will focus on how he’s managed the agency since taking the reins. Questions will come from Republicans and Democrats. What’s he likely to face? 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Gary Hershorn/Reuters

The clock is counting down: Now that tax reform bills have made their way through the House and Senate, Republicans in both chambers are working to iron out the differences between the two bills — with a goal of overhauling the US tax system by December 22.

Affordable housing advocates say that a provision in the House version of the tax bill would remove an incentive for developers to invest in affordable housing.

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Recovery

Stories of people and communities going about the work of recovery from the floods of 2015.

Piano Jazz

Jazz legend Marian McPartland hosted Piano Jazz for over 30 years. The show continues showcasing the top musicians of all time with broadcasts and podcasts from the archives.
From books to barbecue, from current events to colonial history, Walter Edgar's Journal delves into the arts, culture, history of South Carolina and the American South.

Get weekly program highlights via e-mail.

How did the piano get its name? Why can’t you "reach" a crescendo? Who invented opera—and why? Answers to countless classical music questions from Miles Hoffman.

S.C. Public Radio Offers HD Programming in Charleston

Both Classical and News Programming Available.

SC Public Radio and SCETV Content Whenever, Wherever You Want it

On The South Carolina Business Review, Mike Switzer, focuses on news from the state's business community with interviews of small business owners and business leaders …

South Carolina Military and Veterans

Stories about South Carolina veterans, the history of the conflicts in which they served, and those on the home front.