South Carolina Public Radio News

Future drill sergeants practice their techniques on their fellow trainees at Fort Jackson. (File)
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

A new study finds South Carolina among ten states with a larger number of unfit Army recruits compared to the rest of the nation. The research comes from the Citadel, a military school in Charleston, and shows potential soldiers who are not physically fit are more likely to be injured during basic training, costing the Department of Defense and putting our nation's military readiness at risk.

State House Week
SC Public Radio

State lawmakers returned to Columbia this week for the 2018 session of the S.C. General Assembly. Fallout from last summer's collapse of the V.C. Nuclear is expected to dominate this year's session.  Also, this week the House of Representatives wasted little time in overriding Gov. Henry McMaster's veto of some $20 million dollars for new school buses.

Epworth Children's Home in Columbia will soon make available to the public a treat that its residents and visitors have enjoyed for decades: peanut butter ice cream, which has been produced at the home since the Great Depression.
Photo courtesy Riggs Partners, West Columbia, S.C.

For decades, Epworth Children's Home in Columbia has been well known in Methodist circles for two things: caring for children, and the unique dessert it has produced since the Great Depression: peanut butter ice cream.  The government sent the home large quantities of peanut butter to help give the children protein, and the cooks served it in every way they could think of, said Epworth President John Holler.   In those days, the home had a dairy, so someone suggested  trying to make ice cream with it. 

Host Gavin Jackson discusses the upcoming 2018 South Carolina Legislative Session with The Post and Courier's Columbia Bureau Chief, Andy Shain.

Topics include the VC Summer nuclear situation, ethics reform, and more!


Close-up of gas nozzle refueling car.
Andreas [CC0 1.0] via Pixabay

A new gasoline tax credit that takes effect this year will give  South Carolina drivers a little relief from the cost of driving.  The tax credit can be filed for beginning in January 2019 for the 2018 tax year.  This credit is to help offset the annual 2-cent-per- gallon increase in the gasoline tax to be dedicated to road upkeep for the next five years (for a total of six years, or an eventual 12-cents per gallon).  SC Dept.

More SC Public Radio News
This week: Tim Conroy “is a theologian of the best kind, a theologian of the ordinary,” writes poet Ed Madden. “He knows…we have to learn to live the best we can here, now."

Health Law Calls For Automatic Enrollment Of Some Workers

Aug 5, 2014

Newly hired employees who don't sign up for health insurance on the job could have it done for them under a health law provision that may take effect as early as next year.

So many nations are breaking up. Ukraine is in pieces. Moldova is teetering. Libya has no government to speak of. Sudan broke in two last year; now both sides are fighting. Yugoslavia is seven countries. Nigeria has a Christian/Muslim split. Syria has split so many ways it's barely there. Even Scotland is thinking of ditching Great Britain. With every break, we get new lines, new fences, new borders — further evidence of our failure to amalgamate, to get along.

The more borders we have, the more quarrels, the more wars. That's one way to think about borders — they're trouble.

Sometimes nature comes up with elegant solutions to difficult problems, like how to gain weight and not get diabetes.

Take, for instance, the grizzly bear. How does this 750-pound mammal survive long, lean winters? Well, it just gets really fat beforehand and then sleeps the hungry season away.

Grizzly bears can easily double their body fat in the months leading up to hibernation. For us humans, this kind of weight gain could result in some pretty serious health consequences — one of the most common being Type 2 diabetes.

Drug-Resistant Malaria Spreads Across Southeast Asia

Aug 5, 2014

Back in 2008, doctors in Cambodia made a worrisome discovery. They were having a hard time curing some people of malaria.

Tim West's grandfather invented Doritos chips and was an executive at the global snack food giant Frito-Lay.

The younger West ate plenty of junk food growing up. But lately, he's been much more interested in kale, quinoa and tree-ripened fruit.

And the 30-year-old Bay Area food entrepreneur now wants to completely reinvent what we eat and how it's produced.

We usually don't post videos driven by politics. But there is one video making the rounds today that shows a tense conversation between two undocumented young people and Rep. Steve King, a Republican from Iowa.

If you show up at a hospital emergency department with a high fever and you just happen to have been traveling in Africa, don't be surprised if you get a lot of attention.

Hospitals are on the lookout for people with symptoms such as a high fever, vomiting and diarrhea who had been traveling in parts of West Africa affected by Ebola, following instructions from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

On Monday, New York's Mount Sinai Hospital announced that it was evaluating a patient who had recently been in West Africa.

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

When Nimco Ali was 7, she thought her family was going on vacation. They flew from their hometown in Manchester, England, to Djibouti on the Horn of Africa.

Ali doesn't remember the exact location. But she clearly remembers what happened there.

The young girl found herself in a dingy room, with a woman dressed in all black, standing over her. She didn't know what was going on at the time. But she fell asleep. And when Ali woke up, she was confused.

The woman had mutilated her genitals.

Think of it as a state dinner for an entire continent. Tuesday night, after the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit sessions wrap up, the president and the first lady will host 50 heads of state and the chairman of the African Union for dinner. The 400 guests will be treated to a traditional American meal with an African twist in a gigantic tent on the South Lawn and enjoy a performance by Grammy-winning singer-songwriter Lionel Richie.

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News and Features from APM and PRI

Dion Rabouin from Yahoo Finance and Kate Davidson from The Wall Street Journal join us to talk about this week’s economic and business news. This week, Walmart announced it's giving 1 million employees bonuses and wage raises, Fiat-Chrysler announced it will be relocating a plant in Mexico to Michigan and the IRS announced new rules that would give tax payers a bigger paycheck. All of these wins, however were overshadowed by President Donald Trump’s comments about El Salvador, Haiti and some African countries.

Can the Olympics be protected from cyberattacks?

19 hours ago

As athletes gear up for the Olympics, hackers are working hard, too. An unidentified hacker group tried to take over dozens of computers involved with the upcoming games. While hackers are getting craftier, digital protections for everyone involved in the Olympics need to get more complex and expensive. To take us through it all, Molly Wood, host of Marketplace Tech, joined Marketplace Weekend for a discussion about what happened in South Korea, how Olympics organizers build their own internet and just who's on the hook for protecting it.

5 things you need to know about HQ Trivia

19 hours ago

You’ve seen people around your office suddenly intensely staring at their phone around noon Pacific Time/3 p.m. Eastern Time, there’s a good chance they are on an app called HQ Trivia. And if you haven’t seen someone play, you’ve probably heard about it on Twitter.

HQ is an free app that hosts a live trivia game show typically twice a day. HQ sends a notification out when it is game time, then thousands of players log on at the same time to compete against each other for the jackpot. Here are five things you need to know:

It’s a start up

The Consumer Price Index rose 0.1 percent in December from the previous month. The “core” inflation rate — excluding volatile food and energy prices — rose 0.3 percent month-to-month. That’s the largest increase since January 2017, and was higher than economists expected. But does it mean we’re beginning to see a serious uptick in inflation? 

 Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

01/12/2018: Here's the thing about this week

21 hours ago

This week could have been an economic messaging home run for the White House and congressional Republicans. The tax law's kicking it, companies are giving bonuses and raises, some raises anyway. But no. We'll talk about it. Then: T. Boone Pickens announced today he's hanging it up. He's pretty much the stereotype of the big-time oil man, with his Oklahoma-Texas drawl. He made more than a billion dollars in the energy industry and ran a hedge fund, too. We'll talk about his legacy. Plus: Facebook hasn't had the best week, and it capped it off with changes to the News Feed.

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Narrative captures stories of South Carolina through interviews and personal conversations.

Piano Jazz

Jazz legend Marian McPartland hosted Piano Jazz for over 30 years. The show continues showcasing the top musicians of all time with broadcasts and podcasts from the archives.
On The South Carolina Business Review, Mike Switzer, focuses on news from the state's business community with interviews of small business owners and business leaders …

Get weekly program highlights via e-mail.

South Carolina Military and Veterans

Stories about South Carolina veterans, the history of the conflicts in which they served, and those on the home front.

How did the piano get its name? Why can’t you "reach" a crescendo? Who invented opera—and why? Answers to countless classical music questions from Miles Hoffman.

S.C. Public Radio Offers HD Programming in Charleston

Both Classical and News Programming Available.

Recovery

Stories of people and communities going about the work of recovery from the floods of 2015.