Greatest Sounds and Bloopers

Jul 25, 2008

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Snake Handler Holds Rattlers and Records

Jul 25, 2008

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Open Mic: The 'BPP' Staff Says Goodbye

Jul 25, 2008

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German Left Courts the Working Class

Apr 23, 2008

A new political party in Germany has made saving the working class and the country's welfare system rallying points for attracting votes. It has been drawing support from the mainstream parties with a radical message.

The party, Die Linke, or the Left Party, is a merger of the reformed Communist Party from East Germany and discontented former Social Democrats. One of its co-leaders, Oskar Lafontaine, says that Germany shouldn't turn its back on working people just as they are increasingly struggling to make ends meet.

Dance Craze Tecktonik Spreads Through Europe

Mar 14, 2008

With the Macarena long past, a new European dance craze is set to invade U.S. shores.

The Tecktonik began just outside Paris — and is spreading to nightclubs and onto the streets across Europe.

At the Metropolis, one of the biggest nightclubs in the Paris region, the music goes by a lot of different names. Electro. Jump style. Hard style. Hard core. But the only dance is the Tecktonik.

The customers at the club are mostly in their teens and early 20s, middle class, and from every ethnic background. They look as if they were raised by Madonna and Marilyn Manson.

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NPR News Special Coverage: Pentagon Briefing

Apr 1, 2003

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NPR News Special Coverage: Pentagon Briefing

Apr 1, 2003

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News and Features from APM and PRI

Nearly 2 million Muslims take part in the annual pilgrimage to Mecca each year.  

Egyptian journalist and author Mona Eltahawy first participated in the five-day pilgrimage when she was a teenager and something happened that still haunts her today — she was sexually abused.  

Following the momentum of the #MeToo campaign, Eltahawy set in motion #MosqueMeToo, to tell her story and to encourage other Muslim women to step forward and share their experiences of sexual abuse while on the Muslim pilgrimage.

03/14/2018: "A deep desire to be rich"

3 hours ago

(U.S. Edition) When it comes to health care, the U.S. spends a whopping $3 trillion. And the reason for that may not be us going to the doctor's office too often. We'll look at a new article from the Journal of the American Medical Association that shows what may really be the cause. Afterwards, we'll look at South Dakota's push to get out-of-state online retailers to collect sales taxes. Then we'll talk to New York Times reporter Kate Kelly about the culture at Bear Stearns — the investment bank that failed during the financial crisis — and the types of people who worked there.

In 2017 Alabama’s Governor signed into law the Alabama Memorial Preservation Act, which makes it illegal for anyone to move or alter a monument that’s 40 years or older without the approval of a special committee. Despite the fact that violators of the new law face a hefty fine, the law is already being tested in the courts and in some communities. The law’s critics say it is clearly aimed at stopping efforts to take down or alter Confederate memorials.

03/14/2018: U.K. considers fresh Russia sanctions

4 hours ago

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service ... British Prime Minister, Theresa May is expected to announce measures against Russia on Wednesday. The country failed to meet her midnight deadline to explain how a nerve agent was used to poison a former spy, living in the U.K. The Kremlin has strongly denied any involvement — we look at what might happen next. Also in this edition: tributes are being paid to Professor Stephen Hawking, the British scientist who explained the workings of the universe to millions, who has died aged 76.

Science remains a male-dominated field, and in academia, some take advantage of that power. In a 2014 study, Kathryn Clancy, an anthropologist at the University of Illinois, found that harassment was pervasive at research field sites and few people knew of mechanisms to report incidents.

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From books to barbecue, from current events to colonial history, Walter Edgar's Journal delves into the arts, culture, history of South Carolina and the American South.
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South Carolina Military and Veterans

Stories about South Carolina veterans, the history of the conflicts in which they served, and those on the home front.

How did the piano get its name? Why can’t you "reach" a crescendo? Who invented opera—and why? Answers to countless classical music questions from Miles Hoffman.


Stories of people and communities going about the work of recovery from the floods of 2015.