Gavin Jackson and Jamie Lovegrove
A.T. Shire/SC Public Radio

SC Lede: Gubernatorial Arms Race

We're less than two months away from the June 12 South Carolina primary. On this edition of South Carolina Lede , host Gavin Jackson speaks with Post and Courier Statehouse Reporter Jamie Lovegrove about the latest on the race for the governor's office.

Read More

If you show up at a hospital emergency department with a high fever and you just happen to have been traveling in Africa, don't be surprised if you get a lot of attention.

Hospitals are on the lookout for people with symptoms such as a high fever, vomiting and diarrhea who had been traveling in parts of West Africa affected by Ebola, following instructions from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

On Monday, New York's Mount Sinai Hospital announced that it was evaluating a patient who had recently been in West Africa.

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

When Nimco Ali was 7, she thought her family was going on vacation. They flew from their hometown in Manchester, England, to Djibouti on the Horn of Africa.

Ali doesn't remember the exact location. But she clearly remembers what happened there.

The young girl found herself in a dingy room, with a woman dressed in all black, standing over her. She didn't know what was going on at the time. But she fell asleep. And when Ali woke up, she was confused.

The woman had mutilated her genitals.

Think of it as a state dinner for an entire continent. Tuesday night, after the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit sessions wrap up, the president and the first lady will host 50 heads of state and the chairman of the African Union for dinner. The 400 guests will be treated to a traditional American meal with an African twist in a gigantic tent on the South Lawn and enjoy a performance by Grammy-winning singer-songwriter Lionel Richie.

This post was last updated at 7 p.m. ET.

An attacker wearing an Afghan military uniform opened fire at service members of the NATO-led coalition in Afghanistan on Tuesday, killing a U.S. major general.

The officer's family has been notified of his death; his name is Harold Greene.

Army Chief of Staff Gen. Ray Odierno issued a note of condolence, saying of Greene and others caught by the attack, "These soldiers were professionals, committed to the mission. It is their service and sacrifice that define us as an Army."

Following an industry trend, Gannett announced on Tuesday that it intends to split its company in two. One half will handle the newspapers and the other its broadcasting and digital operations.

The AP reports:

When Kids Start Playing To Win

Aug 5, 2014

This week, NPR Ed is focusing on questions about why people play and how play relates to learning.

It's a playful word that's developed something of a bad reputation: "competition." The fear among some parents is that, once children start playing to win, at around 5 years old, losing isn't just hard. It's devastating.

After nearly a month of fighting, a negotiated, three-day peace has taken hold in Gaza.

As NPR's Emily Harris reports, Israel has also ordered all of its troops out of Gaza. But this may not mean the end of the current conflict, because the Israel Defense Forces said its troops would maintain a defensive position and respond to any attacks.

Case in point: By morning just before the truce started, Emily said she heard rocket fire out of Gaza. But things have calmed down and the AP reports that in Gaza "traffic picked up and shops started opening doors."

Carmen Smith remembers the day about a year ago when she gained Medicaid coverage.

"It was like Christmas Day, it was like getting a gift from Santa Claus!" she says. "People don't realize how important and how special it is to have insurance to be able to go see a doctor on a regular basis when you have an illness like mine."

Smith, 44, has Type 2 diabetes. Before qualifying for Medicaid coverage, she was what policy experts call a "frequent flier." She had used the emergency room at MetroHealth, the public hospital in Cleveland, five times in one year.

Like it or not, television has the power to shape our perceptions of the world. So what do sitcoms, dramas and reality TV say about poor people?

In life and on TV, "poor" is relative. Take breakfast: For Honey Boo Boo's family, it's microwaved sausage and pancake sandwiches; for children in The Wire's Baltimore ghetto, it's a juice box and a bag of chips before school; and on Good Times, set in the Chicago projects back in the 1970s, it was a healthier choice: oatmeal.

Pages

News and Features from APM and PRI

Teklit Michael started running with Eritrea’s fastest athletes when he was just 14 years old. His plan: to compete in the 2012 London Olympics. 

Michael burned through a pair of sneakers nearly every month, so he went to work at a government textile factory to foot the bill. One day after hours of labor, he went to collect his earnings. But he says his supervisor, a government employee, refused to pay him. When Michael pushed back, the man threatened him. 

“He told me, 'You are a son of a bitch, and you are talking against the government,'” Michael recalls.

(Markets Edition) Starting today, the Supreme Court will hear a case on whether out-of-state businesses should pay South Dakota state and local taxes if they ship a product to a state. We'll take a brief look at the advantage online retailers have in not charging sales taxes, and why Amazon might actually be at a disadvantage here. Afterwards, we'll look at a new report showing that we're not building new homes fast enough to meet demand in 22 states.

Study finds housing shortages in 22 states

6 hours ago

Starbucks is now planning to make its managers undergo unconscious bias training. 

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzō Abe meets with President Donald Trump today at the president’s Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida. Likely to be on tap: trade, tariffs and North Korea. 

Click the above audio player to hear the full story.

More...

Piano Jazz

Jazz legend Marian McPartland hosted Piano Jazz for over 30 years. The show continues showcasing the top musicians of all time with broadcasts and podcasts from the archives.

South Carolina Military and Veterans

Stories about South Carolina veterans, the history of the conflicts in which they served, and those on the home front.

South Carolina Lede

South Carolina Lede is a podcast about the people and issues shaping South Carolina state.
On The South Carolina Business Review, Mike Switzer, focuses on news from the state's business community with interviews of small business owners and business leaders …

Get weekly program highlights via e-mail.

How did the piano get its name? Why can’t you "reach" a crescendo? Who invented opera—and why? Answers to countless classical music questions from Miles Hoffman.

Recovery

Stories of people and communities going about the work of recovery from the floods of 2015.