This Week on Walter Edgar's Journal

Forgotten Jazz Great: Charleston’s Fud Livingston

'Jazz Age' arranger, composer, and musician made memorable music.

South Carolina Public Radio News

Lowcountry Bridge Will Remain Closed Four More Weeks

2 hours ago
South Carolina Department of Transportation Announces Plans for Wando Bridge with Local City Officials
Victoria Hansen

It’s about four inches wide, 1,000 feet long and it shut down a critical, bridge in the Lowcountry Monday after it snapped. Now state transportation officials say it will take four weeks to repair the steel cable, one of eight, that connects the concrete segments of the James B. Edwards Bridge, better known as the Wando. The west bound lanes of I-526 over the bridge have been closed ever since, snarling traffic in the Charleston area.

abstract mental health symbol
GDJ via Pixabay

May is Mental Health Awareness Month, and there is much that most people are not aware of about mental health.  Just more than 43 million Americans experience a mental illness in a given year, including millions of cases of depression, anxiety order and Alzheimer’s disease.  USC psychiatrist Dr. Meera Narasimhan says many illnesses are caused by the stresses of everyday life, such as unemployment or divorce, or more jarring experiences such as war.  

Starting a Mobile Business class travels to different bases throughout the state.
Thelisha Eaddy/ SC Public Radio

One of the ways the Small Business Administration (SBA) provides assistance to small businesses is through education. SBA provides free individual face-to-face, and internet counseling for small businesses, and low-cost training to nascent entrepreneurs and established small businesses. In South Carolina, a fairly new education program for military spouses teaches how to start a mobile business. South Carolina Public Radio talks with the creator of the class to learn how a successful small business can help military spouses, their families and the economy.

The mandolin is a central of many Bluegrass groups. (Mandolin player with the Jeff Austin Band, on stage at the 80/35 music festival in Des Moines, July, 2016.)
Max Goldberg via Flickr [CC BY 2.0}

Bluegrass music has always been popular in South Carolina, but Willie Wells thinks it’s about to break out to a new, mass popularity.  Every Friday night, Wells holds a bluegrass jam at his store, Bill’s Music Shop and Pickin’ Parlor.  Fans and musicians enjoy a performance before getting out their guitars, banjos and fiddles to play country, gospel and bluegrass tunes with each other. 

SC Lede: So Long And Thanks For All The Bills

May 15, 2018
Gavin Jackson (r) speaks with Andy Brown (l) and Jamie Lovegrove in the South Carolina Public Radio studios on Monday, May 14, 2018.
A.T. Shire/SC Public Radio

On this edition of South Carolina Lede, host Gavin Jackson is joined by Post and Courier Statehouse Reporters Andy Brown and Jamie Lovegrove to look back on the 2018 South Carolina legislative session.

While lawmakers managed to pass several high profile bills to the governor's desk this session, they will reconvene later this month and in June to continue debate over the $8.2 billion state budget and bills dealing with the failed V.C. Summer nuclear project.

More SC Public Radio News

After nearly a month of fighting, a negotiated, three-day peace has taken hold in Gaza.

As NPR's Emily Harris reports, Israel has also ordered all of its troops out of Gaza. But this may not mean the end of the current conflict, because the Israel Defense Forces said its troops would maintain a defensive position and respond to any attacks.

Case in point: By morning just before the truce started, Emily said she heard rocket fire out of Gaza. But things have calmed down and the AP reports that in Gaza "traffic picked up and shops started opening doors."

Carmen Smith remembers the day about a year ago when she gained Medicaid coverage.

"It was like Christmas Day, it was like getting a gift from Santa Claus!" she says. "People don't realize how important and how special it is to have insurance to be able to go see a doctor on a regular basis when you have an illness like mine."

Smith, 44, has Type 2 diabetes. Before qualifying for Medicaid coverage, she was what policy experts call a "frequent flier." She had used the emergency room at MetroHealth, the public hospital in Cleveland, five times in one year.

Like it or not, television has the power to shape our perceptions of the world. So what do sitcoms, dramas and reality TV say about poor people?

In life and on TV, "poor" is relative. Take breakfast: For Honey Boo Boo's family, it's microwaved sausage and pancake sandwiches; for children in The Wire's Baltimore ghetto, it's a juice box and a bag of chips before school; and on Good Times, set in the Chicago projects back in the 1970s, it was a healthier choice: oatmeal.

A senior minister in the British government's foreign office tendered her resignation on Tuesday, protesting what she said was the U.K. government's "morally indefensible" position on the conflict in Gaza.

Sayeeda Warsi, a baroness with a seat in the House of Lords who became the first Muslim member of the prime minister's cabinet, is opposed to Britain's strong support of Israel.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Now it's time for Faith Matters. That's another part of the program that listeners have told us they very much appreciate. That's where we talk about matters of faith, religion and spirituality.

How Do Our Worst Moments Shape Us?

Aug 1, 2014

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Growing Up.

About Andrew Solomon's TED Talk

Writer Andrew Solomon dives into his childhood to describe moments of great adversity, and how they helped him build identity.

About Andrew Solomon

What Does It Mean To Be A 'Child Of The State'?

Aug 1, 2014

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Growing Up.

About Lemn Sissay's TED Talk

Poet Lemn Sissay was raised by the state. He talks about the empty space where his family should have been.

About Lemn Sissay

What Can Kids Learn By Doing Dangerous Things?

Aug 1, 2014

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Growing Up.

About Gever Tulley's TED Talk

Tinkering School Founder Gever Tulley says that when kids are given sharp tools and matches, their imaginations take off and they become better problem-solvers.

About Gever Tulley

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News and Features from APM and PRI

This week, retailers have been releasing their earnings and doing better than many expected. Today, we’ll get Nordstrom earnings after the bell. Facing the ongoing threat from e-commerce, the company is digging in to the in store experience, especially for one particular group of consumers.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

The problems with a declining birth rate

3 hours ago

(Markets Edition) The birthrate in America just keeps going down. We talked to Diane Swonk, the chief economist at the accounting and consulting firm Grant Thornton, about the economic troubles this will cause for the U.S. down the road. Afterwards, we'll look at how Britain is placing limits on some fixed-odds betting machines, and then discuss how the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision to OK legal sports will impact New Jersey. (05/17/2018)

During their historic summit last month inside the demilitarized zone, Korean leaders Kim Jong-un and Moon Jae-in grasped hands over the demarcation line that divides their countries.

Inspired by this gesture and the promise of long-awaited peace with their northern neighbor, some South Koreans are now reenacting that handshake at a replica of the Joint Security Area (JSA).

Halfway through the flight, the officers took off Omar Blas Olvera’s handcuffs. He asked why. They had entered Mexican territory, an immigration agent told him. It was July 26, 2017. After they landed in Mexico City, he looked out the window and saw the airport’s signs in Spanish.

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Piano Jazz

Jazz legend Marian McPartland hosted Piano Jazz for over 30 years. The show continues showcasing the top musicians of all time with broadcasts and podcasts from the archives.

South Carolina Military and Veterans

Stories about South Carolina veterans, the history of the conflicts in which they served, and those on the home front.

The South Carolina Lede

Gavin Jackson and guests break down state political news and go inside the legislative happenings that could affect you, your family, and your pocketbook.

Walter Edgar's Journal

Walter Edgar's Journal delves into the arts, culture, history of South Carolina and the American South. All Stations: Fri at noon | News & Talk Stations: Sun at 4pm
Narrative captures stories of South Carolina through interviews and personal conversations.
On The South Carolina Business Review, Mike Switzer, focuses on news from the state's business community with interviews of small business owners and business leaders …

Get weekly program highlights via e-mail.

How did the piano get its name? Why can’t you "reach" a crescendo? Who invented opera—and why? Answers to countless classical music questions from Miles Hoffman.

Recovery

Stories of people and communities going about the work of recovery from the floods of 2015.