Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

Mozart's Optimism

15 hours ago

It’s hard to find a classical music lover who doesn’t love the music of Mozart. It’s when we try to describe why we love Mozart that things can get complicated. We’re describing something indisputably real—our love of Mozart—but unless we stick to strictly technical analyses, we have to use words that will necessarily be both subjective and metaphorical. My own words? I keep coming back to two: humanity and optimism.


As the swinging pianist in the Quincy Jones Orchestra, Patti Bown (1931 – 2008) kept the music moving. In honor of her July 26 birthday, Piano Jazz remembers Bown with this encore from the early years of the program. Bown joins host McPartland to talk about the role of women in jazz. She presents her rendition of Coltrane's "Giant Steps" and shares her Swahili love song, "Oh My Darling, How I Love You."

News Stations: Sat, Jul 29, 8 pm | Classical Station: Sun, Jul 30, 7 pm

West Fraser
westfraserstudio.com

(Originally Broadcast 04/07/17) - Painting the Southern Coast: The Art of West Fraser (2016, USC Press) is a collection of the works of one of the nation's most respected painters of representational art. A mastery of his medium and the scope of work ensure his place in Southern art history. A true son of the Lowcountry, Fraser has dedicated much of his career to capturing the lush, primordial beauty of the Southeast's coastal regions that have been altered by man and time.

Beethoven's Shadow

Jul 21, 2017

For convenience sake, the 19 th century is usually known as the era of Romanticism in classical music. This is not necessarily wrong, but it certainly does lump a great number of composers of very different styles into one broad category. Another way to view the 19 th century is simply as the era of Beethoven. And that’s because after Beethoven, all composers were seen and evaluated in Beethoven’s light, or rather in his enormous shadow.


In 1838, ten years after the death of Franz Schubert, Robert Schumann traveled to Vienna, and while he was there he paid a visit to the graves of Schubert and Beethoven. On a whim, Schumann decided to call on Schubert’s brother, Ferdinand, who was living in Vienna, and this turned out to be perhaps the most fortuitous social call in the history of music.


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