Rudy Mancke

Host

Naturalist Rudy Mancke served as naturalist and co-host of South Carolina ETV's NatureScene which began it's long run in 1978. His field trips, broadcast nationwide, have earned him a legion of dedicated viewers. Rudy's knowledge of the complex inner-workings of different ecosystems and his great admiration for the natural world make him the perfect guide. In fact, the National Wildlife Federation and the Garden Club of America honored his commitment to resource conservation with special awards. Since retiring from SCETV, Rudy has gone on to teach at the University of South Carolina, Columbia.

Before coming to television, Rudy served as the natural history curator at the South Carolina State Museum for 10 years, and was a high school biology and geology teacher. He earned a degree at Wofford College, attended graduate school at the University of South Carolina, and received honorary doctorate degrees from the College of Charleston, Winthrop College, and Wofford College.

Rudy Mancke currently hosts NatureNotes on both SCETV and South Carolina Public Radio.

Contact Rudy Mancke

Ways to Connect

Happy Valentine's Day!

Feb 14, 2018
NatureNotes
SC Public Radio

Rudy shares a passage from The Dewy Morn, by Richard Jeffries.

A Southern Yellowjacket.
Bob Peterson (CC BY 2.0) via Flickr

A listener is surprised to see Yellowjackets devouring an animal carcass. Unusual? Not really: Yellowjackets  are omnivorous.

NatureNotes
SC Public Radio

As the name implies, you'll find these fungi in the winter.

Barnacles on the Beach

Feb 9, 2018
NatureNotes
SC Public Radio

A listener finds some Barnacles on Myrtle Beach.

Brown Snakes

Feb 8, 2018
A Dekay's snake (Storeria dekayi), aka Brown snake.
David Cappaert, Bugwood.org

Brown Snakes are nonvenomous, and they often hibernate in piles of dead leaves.

The egg mass and some newly hatched wheel bugs (Arilus cristatus).
Whitney Cranshaw, Colorado State University, Bugwood.org

A listener finds the egg mass of a Wheel Bug.

Mystery Egg Case

Feb 6, 2018
A Spiny Backed Orb Weaver.
David Cappaert, Bugwood.org

The egg case of the Spiny Backed Orb Weaver is bright green.

A Snowy Owl.
Rob Routledge, Sault College, Bugwood.org

Highly unusual sightings of Snowy Owls have been made in South Carolina this winter.

Happy Whistle Pig Day!

Feb 2, 2018
A Groundhog
Brett Marshall, Sault College, Bugwood.org

Groundhogs are usually called Woodchucks in South Carolina. In the past they were often called Whistle Pigs.

Manatees in the Cold

Feb 1, 2018
A Manatee
Whitney Cranshaw, Colorado State University, Bugwood.org

When extremely cold weather hits South Carolina, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service tries to push Manatees southward to warmer waters.

American Woodcock

Jan 31, 2018
An American Woodcock
Ricky Layson, Ricky Layson Photography, Bugwood.org

The American Woodcock is a permanent resident of South Carolina.

Snowball Snake

Jan 30, 2018
A Yellow Rat Snake.
Cliff from Arlington, Virginia, USA, via Wikimedia Commons

A Charleston listener has the rare chance to engage in a snowball fight, and makes a remarkable find in one of his missiles.

Major Sallow Moth

Jan 29, 2018
A Major Sallow moth, Feralia major.
CBG Photography Group, Centre for Biodiversity Genomics [CC BY-NC-SA 3.0]

A listener photographs a moth that she says looks like it's wearing a Christmas sweater.

"Ground Cedar"

Jan 26, 2018
Ground Cedar.
Nancy Magnusson [CC BY-NC 2.0] via Flickr

You'll find this green club moss on the ground among the brown, dead leaves in the winter.

Lichen with Legs?

Jan 25, 2018
A debris-carrying Aphis Lion, the larval form of the Green Lacewing.
USA, TX, Travis Co.: Austin Brackenridge Field Laboratory [CC0 1.0] via Flickr

The Aphis Lion carries remains of its prey on its back, along with other debris. Great camouflage!

Ferruginous Sandstone

Jan 24, 2018
Ferruginous Sandstone (banded).
Amcyrus2012 [CC BY 4.0] via Wikimedia Commons

Similar to mudstone, this sandstone is held together by iron oxide.

Winter Birds

Jan 23, 2018
Yellow Bellied Sapsucker
dfaulder, via Wikimedia Commons

There are plenty of birds that come to South Carolina in the Winter. Rudy mentions two of his favorites.

A Northern Brownsnake.
coloneljohnbritt [CC BY-NC-SA 2.0] via Flickr

A listener finds a Brownsnake in his yard and wants to know, will it keep Copperheads out of its territory?

Skeletons

Jan 19, 2018
NatureNotes
SC Public Radio

Skeletal material can tell you a lot, if you know what to look fore.

Leaves, Green and Brown

Jan 18, 2018
NatureNotes
SC Public Radio

Midst the brown, dead leaves,  this time of year you can sometimes to find the green leaves of the Crane-Fly Orchid.

White Dots on the River

Jan 17, 2018
NatureNotes
SC Public Radio

Gulls are on the rivers this time of year.

January

Jan 16, 2018
NatureNotes
SC Public Radio

Rudy shares some words by Phil Robinson, from Garden, Orchard, and Spinney.

A Skull in the Forest

Jan 16, 2018
NatureNotes
SC Public Radio

A listener finds a skull in the forest with splayed canine teeth.

Spotted at the Feeder

Jan 12, 2018
NatureNotes
SC Public Radio

Rudy reports on the sightings at his backyard bird feeder.

A Leaf-Footed Bug
Lyle Buss, Department of Entomology and Nematology, University of Florida

Leaf-footed bugs often over-winter as adults in South Carolina.

Mantis Fly

Jan 10, 2018
A Mantis Fly.
Pavel Kirillov [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

The front legs of the Mantis Fly resemble those of a Mantis.

A Western Visitor

Jan 9, 2018
A Rufous-Tailed Hummingbird.
Alfred Viola, Northeastern University, Bugwood.org

Western hummingbirds have been increasingly sited in the eastern U.S.

Marbled Salamanders

Jan 8, 2018
A marbled salamander.
cotinis [CC BY-NC-SA 2.0] via Flickr

The Marbled Salamander is often found under logs or debris on flood plains.

NatureScene

Jan 5, 2018
NatureNotes
SC Public Radio

A listener from Vermont salutes the work of Rudy Mancke and Jim Welch over the years on SCETV's NatureScene.

Ant Lion Pits

Jan 4, 2018
Ant lion larva (Myrmeleontidae).
NPS/Robb Hannawacker

The indentations around the nest of an Ant Lion larva are for trapping prey.

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