Walter Edgar

Host

Dr. Walter Edgar has two programs on South Carolina Public Radio: Walter Edgar's Journal, and South Carolina from A to Z. Dr. Edgar received his A.B. degree from Davidson College in 1965 and his Ph.D. from the University of South Carolina in 1969. After two years in the army (including a tour of duty in Vietnam), he returned to USC as a post-doctoral fellow of the National Archives, assigned to the Papers of Henry Laurens. In 1972 he joined the faculty of the History Department and in 1980 was named director of the Institute for Southern Studies. Dr. Edgar is the Claude Henry Neuffer Professor of Southern Studies and the George Washington Distinguished Professor of History. He retired from USC in 2012. He has written or edited numerous books about South Carolina and the American South, including South Carolina: A History, the first new history of the state in more than 60 years. With more than 37,000 copies in print and an audio edition, it has been a publishing phenomenon. Partisans & Redcoats: The Southern Conflict that Turned the Tide of the American Revolution is in its fourth printing. He is also the editor of the South Carolina Encyclopedia.

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South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"E" is for Enterprise Railroad. Chartered in 1870, with a capital of $250,000, this railroad is unique in South Carolina history: with one exception its initial board of directors were all African Americans. Constructed in 1874, the railroad used horse-drawn carriages to passengers and freight, connecting wharves and railroad depots throughout the city of Charleston. The railroad created tension within Charleston’s black community as 75% of the city’s draymen were African American. They feared the company would diminish their business.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"C" is for Chalmers, Lionel [1715-1777]. Physician. Scientist. A native of Scotland, Chalmers was in Charleston in 1737 where he established a modest practice. In 1740 he entered into partnership with Dr. John Lining. Lining had been recording weather data for years. Between 1750 and 1759 Chalmers compiled his own series of meteorological records. Later he combined Lining’s records with his in his best known work, An Account of the Weather and Diseases in South Carolina—published in London in 1776.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"B" is for Bennett, Thomas, Jr. [1781-1865]. Governor. With his father, Bennett built a lucrative lumber and rice mill business in Charleston. He was active in the Chamber of Commerce and served as a director of the Bank of the State of South Carolina, and the Louisville, Cincinnati, and Charleston Railroad. He was mayor of Charleston and served six terms in the South Carolina House of Representatives—and was its Speaker. He was elected to the State Senate in 1819, but resigned a year later when he was elected Governor.

Dr. Lorien Foote
[CC BY-NC-ND 2.0] / University of Central Arkansas

(Originally broadcast 09/15/17) - During the winter of 1864, more than 3,000 Federal prisoners of war escaped from Confederate prison camps into South Carolina and North Carolina, often with the aid of local slaves. Their flight created, in the words of contemporary observers, a "Yankee plague," heralding a grim end to the Confederate cause. In The Yankee Plague: Escaped Union Prisoners and the Collapse of the Confederacy (2016, UNC Press) Dr.

"W" is for Wright, Mary Honor Farrow [1862-1946]. Educator. Born into slavery in Spartanburg County, Wright received her early education from northern teachers who came to South Carolina after the Civil War. In 1879, after graduating from Claflin University, she accepted her first teaching position in Inman, where she held classes in a brush arbor. She later organized schools and taught in mill villages and churches in Spartanburg and Saxon. In 1904 she organized a school in her home for black children who were to young to walk to the nearest black school.

"M" is for Magrath, Andrew Gordon [1813-1893]. Jurist, governor. After graduating from the South Carolina College, Magrath studied law at Harvard and with James L. Petigru. In 1856 his appointment as a federal district judge brought him national attention and controversy. In the cases surrounding two ships seized for being slave traders—the Echo and the Wanderer—Magrath declared that the federal statues on piracy did not apply to the slave trade. His decision was hailed in the South and condemned in the North.

"K" is for Kershaw, Joseph Brevard [1822-1894]. Soldier, Jurist. Kershaw, a native of Camden, was a member of the General Assembly and of the Secession Convention. In April 1861 he was a colonel of the Second South Carolina Regiment which played an active role in the Confederate victory at First Manassas. The next year he was promoted to brigadier general and given command of the brigade that saw action at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg.

"J" is for Jakes, John

Dec 26, 2017

"J" is for Jakes, John [b. 1932]. Novelist. Born in Illinois, Jakes is a nationally known best-selling novelist and historian. For several decades, he maintained his primary residence on Hilton Head Island. After graduating from DePauw University, he spent a number of years working for pharmaceutical and advertising companies. Then, in 1973 he published the first of eight volumes of the Kent Family Chronicles—a series that depicted the American Revolution through the eyes of one fictional family.

Frank Kearns
WVU Press

(Originally broadcast 09/08/17) - Columbian Gerald Davis is co-producer of the 2012 Emmy-winning documentary Frank Kearns: American Correspondent first aired on West Virginia Public Television. Recently, Davis has published Algerian Diary: Frank Kearns and the "Impossible Assignment" for CBS News (2016, WVU Press). He talks with Walter Edgar about his deep dive into Kearns’ life and the assignment that changed the way the U.S. viewed Algeria’s fight for independence from France.

"I" is for indigo

Dec 25, 2017

"I" is for indigo. Indigo, a plant that produces a blue dye was an important part of 18th century South Carolina's economy. It was grown commercially from 1747 till 1800 and was second only to rice in export value. Eliza Lucas Pinckney experimented with its cultivation in the 1730s and 1740s. In 1749 Parliament placed a bounty of six pence per pound on the dye. Indigo was grown on lands not suited to rice cultivation and thus fit nicely into the existing agricultural economy. By the eve of the Revolution, the colony exported more than one million pounds of dye.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"A" is for Aiken, William, Sr. [1778-1831]. Merchant. Banker. Railroad Developer. A native of, Ireland, Aiken immigrated to South Carolina with his family when only a lad. He grew up in Winnsboro and when a young man was apprenticed to a Charleston cotton merchant. With his employer’s support, Aiken went into business as a cotton factor for himself. Later, he served as a director of the Planters’ and Mechanics’ Bank of South Carolina, the Union Insurance Company, and the Charleston Branch of the Bank of the United States. For seven years he represented the parishes of St. Philip’s and St.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"W" is for Watson, Albert William [1922-1994]. Legislator. Congressman. After service in World War II, Watson earned his law degree from USC and established a practice in Columbia. He served several terms in the South Carolina House of Representatives. In 1962 he was elected to Congress from the Second District as a Democrat and was reelected in 1964. In 1965, stripped of his seniority for supporting Republican Barry Goldwater for President, Watson resigned his seat and was reelected as a Republican in 1966 and 1968. In 1970, he ran for governor against John West.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"T" is for Theus, Jeremiah [1716-1774]. Portrait Painter. Theus was born in Switzerland and immigrated to Orangeburg District in 1735. Five years later, he moved to Charleston and advertised his services as a limner (portraitist) and sign painter. Despite his lack of formal training, Theus modeled his likenesses after fashionable English portraits of the day. The large majority of his portraits are half-lengths with sitters standing erect and shown without their hands. While the men wear sober street clothes, women are dressed in great finery of lace, fabric, pearls, and even ermine.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for St. Paul's Parish. St. Paul’s Parish was one of the original parishes created in 1706. The parish included a mainland region between the South Edisto and Stono Rivers as well as the adjacent Sea Islands. Later the Sea Islands were separated into St. John’s Colleton Parish. The Parish Church was completed in 1707 near the south branch of the Stono River, but was moved further inland in 1737. Rice and indigo dominated the colonial economy of the parish, but after the American Revolution, sea island cotton replaced indigo as a staple.

Cardinal Joseph Bernardin
dailytheology.org

As a priest, archbishop, and president of the US bishops' conference, Cardinal Joseph Bernardin, a native of Columbia, S.C., lived a ministry marked by thoughtfulness, compassion, and conviction. In his book, Joseph Bernardin: Seeking Common Ground (2016, Liturgical Press), Steven P.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"R" is for Rea, Paul Marshall [1878-1948]. Biologist. Educator. Museologist. Rea moved to Charleston in 1903 as professor of biology and geology and as curator of the museum at the College of Charleston. Through public lectures and publications he made the museum more visible. He also founded the Charleston Natural History Society. In 1906, he negotiated a change in the name from the College of Charleston Museum to the Charleston Museum and he assumed the title of director. Rea remained on the college staff until 1914 when he became full-time director of the museum.

"An accurate map of North and South Carolina with their Indian frontiers, shewing in a distinct manner all the mountains, rivers, swamps, marshes, bays, creeks, harbours, sandbanks and soundings on the coasts." Henry Mouzon, 1775
Norman B. Leventhal Map Center (NBL Map Center) at the Boston Public Library (BPL) [CC BY 2.0]

A two-decade, joint effort between South Carolina and North Carolina has sought to correct errors made surveying the boundary line between the two states. The errors began with the first survey, made in 1735, and were compounded over the years. Alan-Jon Zupan, a former project manager for the South Carolina Geological Survey, and David Ballard, currently with SCGS, join Walter Edgar to talk about the history of South Carolina’s northern line, and the modern-day efforts to get it right.

All Stations: Fri, Dec 15, 12 pm | News & Talk Stations: Sun, Dec 17, 4 pm

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"D" is for Doby, Lawrence Edward.


USC/Thomas Cooper Library

In spite of a growing movement for journalistic neutrality in reporting the news of the 20th century, journalists enlisted on both sides of the mid-century struggle for civil rights. Indeed, against all odds, the seeds of social change found purchase in South Carolina with newspaperman John McCray and his allies at the Lighthouse and Informer, who challenged readers to "rebel and fight"--to reject the "slavery of thought and action" and become "progressive fighters" for equality.

"C" is for Central, SC.


Chief Justice Ernest A. Finney, Jr.
SC Hall of Fame

Justice Ernest A. Finney, Jr., South Carolina's first Africa-American chief justice, has died Sunday, December 3, 2017. He was 86. Finney was one of just a handful of black lawyers in the state when he graduated from the South Carolina State College School of Law in 1954. Finney was elected chief justice of South Carolina in 1994 and retired from the court in 2000.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"A" is for Ashwood Plantation.


South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"E" is for Ensore, Joshua Fulton.


"T" is for Tega Cay

Dec 1, 2017
South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"T" is for Tega Cay, in York County; population 4044. Tega Cay is a recreational oriented community on Lake Wiley, with stronger ties to North Carolina than South Carolina. Tega Cay came into being in 1970 when Duke Power sold 1600 acres in northwestern Fort Mill township to a Charlotte developer. The name allegedly comes from an obscure Polynesian dialect and means "lovely peninsula." Historically, the site was identified as India Hook H ills which aptly described the red clay spur of land that jutted like a fish hook into the Catawba River.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for St. James-Santee Parish. The parish of Saint James-Santee was established in 1706 and included the Northwestern portions of modern Berkeley and Charleston Counties. The earliest Europeans in the area were Huguenots. In 1706 the French and English settlers of the area petitioned the commons house for parish status. Because of the language barrier within the congregation of the parish church, for decades St. James-Santee required a bilingual clergyman who could speak to the congregation and both French and English.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"R" is for ratification of the United States Constitution. South Carolina’s ratification of a new federal Constitution in 1789 was never in doubt. Representation in the ratification convention was heavily skewed in favor of the Lowcountry where there was tremendous support for a strong federal government. Lowcountry residents were uncomfortable with the political forces unleashed by independence and the defeat of the British, and they did not trust the backcountry.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"P" is for Palmetto Medical, Dental, and Pharmaceutical Association. Throughout the 19th century, African-American physicians in South Carolina were barred from hospitals and clinics and they lacked access to many medications and supplies. In 1896, five black physicians formed the Palmetto State Medical Association as a vehicle to improve healthcare for black Carolinians and to graduate more medically trained personnel. Early meetings focused on the advancements of Medical science and efforts to lower black mortality rates.

Trowel at an archaeological dig.
HeritageDaily [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

In Charleston: An Archaeology of Life in a Coastal Community (2016, University Press of Florida), Martha Zierden, Curator of Historical Archaeology at The Charleston Museum; and, Dr. Betsy Reitz, University of Georgia Athens, weave archaeology and history to illuminate this vibrant, densely packed Atlantic port city. They detail the residential, commercial, and public life of the city, the ruins of taverns, markets, and townhouses, including those of Thomas Heyward, shipping merchant Nathaniel Russell, and William Aiken.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"O" is for Olympia Cotton Mill. The Olympia Cotton Mill was one of four mills designed and built by industrialist W. B. Smith Whaley. Construction began in 1899 and by 1900 the mail was an operation, often call the world’s largest cotton mill under one roof. It housed more than 100,000 spindles and 2250 looms in a mammoth, multi-storied and towered brick structure, some 150 by 550 feet. All machinery was powered by electricity. The mill village contained a kindergarten, school, gymnasium, and the first playground in the Columbia area.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"C" is for Cainhoy Riot. The Cainhoy Riot was one of the many deadly frays involving white gun clubs and African American militiamen that erupted during the 1876 gubernatorial campaign. A Republican political meeting was scheduled for October 16th at Brick House some thirty miles up the Cooper River from Charleston. Based upon previous disturbances, African Americans came to the meeting armed. Soon whites from Charleston arrived by steamboat and tried to disrupt the proceedings. A scuffle broke out and shots were fired.

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