Marketplace

All Stations: Mon-Fri, 6:30 - 7:00 pm
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

Hosted by Kai Ryssdal, Marketplace is an in-depth program that focuses on everything from the latest business news both nationally and internationally, the global economy, and wider events linked to the financial markets. The only national daily business news program originating from the West Coast, Marketplace is noted for its timely, relevant and accessible coverage of business, economics and personal finance.

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Video game addiction is real

4 hours ago

(Markets Edition) The World Health Organization has released a new list of official medical conditions, which includes "gaming disorder," where people obsessively play video and computer games. We'll take a look at what exactly the disorder entails and why insurance companies might be able to cover it now. Afterwards, we'll discuss the nationwide increase in suicides, and how funding to address the issue is lagging behind.

President Donald Trump has nominated a permanent director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the agency created after the financial crisis. The nominee, Kathy Kraninger, is a federal budget official. We take a look at why the White House chose her and how the bureau has changed since its inception.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Maybe the U.S. and global economies keep ticking along until the end of time and the markets remain forever chill. But that's not what history tells us. It's also not the view of the biggest hedge fund in the world: Bridgewater Associates.

In recent weeks, it's been circulating a warning. Bridgewater co-chief investment officer Greg Jensen and two of his colleagues say that, "We are bearish on almost all financial assets while markets are still pricing in Goldilocks conditions" and that "2019 is setting up to be a dangerous period for the economy." 

(U.S. Edition) President Trump has nominated a permanent director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau: Kathy Kraninger, a federal budget official. We'll take a look at her experience and why the White House says it chose her. Next, we'll discuss how the French government isn't very happy with General Electric's job creation progress in France. Before GE was allowed to buy the energy generation part of the French conglomerate Alsthom, it had a mandate to create a thousand jobs in the country. Then finally, we'll talk to Washington Post columnist Allan Sloan about how U.S.

Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States, and it’s the on the rise, but we have no idea why.

“We have the science of suicide that we’ve paid for, which is to say ... not much,” said Dr. April Foreman at the American Association of Suicidology. “The reason we don’t have good answers is that we fund suicide-related research at a fraction of the other kinds of research for other causes of death.”

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service...Ongoing disagreement in Germany over asylum seekers is threatening Chancellor Angela Merkel’s leadership and could put her political future in jeopardy. How can the country’s government balance its own immigration challenges with broader policies across the European Union?  Then, the agriculture industry is challenged in northern Chile as people there struggle with a persistently dry climate amid years of drought. But innovative farmers have learned to harness the power of fog to help relieve their struggle.

Can you make money off of emoji?

10 hours ago

More than 150 new emoji have been approved by the emoji standards body called Unicode. A redheaded person, a llama, toilet paper and bagels are just some of the new symbols. It's a big deal if you happen to be a redheaded llama farmer, but also because the release of new emoji is a carefully coordinated situation that requires approval from an emoji standards body called Unicode. And a design process that's specific to every operating system and, at least so far, no money changing hands. Jeremy Burge is Chief Emoji Officer for Emojipedia — which is kind of like Merriam-Webster for emoji.

The sequel to the animated superhero film "The Incredibles" opens in movie theaters across the country today. The original film came out in 2004, grossing $633 million worldwide. So with those kind of numbers, why did it take 14 years to make a sequel?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Negotiation in global politics have dominated the headlines recently, between North Korea and U.S. relations, international trade dealings and the G-7 summit.

How to be a composer

Jun 15, 2018

Everyone has a dream job growing up: doctor, vet, ice cream taste tester. But how do you actually get the gig? Marketplace Weekend is looking into how, with the occasional series, How to Be a ...

Following the money in soccer's biggest scandal

Jun 15, 2018

The World Cup began on Thursday. It is arguably the biggest sporting event in the world. It's also a multibillion-dollar business with TV distribution deals, sponsorships — and corruption. Lots of corruption. The story of FIFA, the international soccer governing body, is also a story of bribery, international intrigue, a former spy who compiled a dossier on President Donald Trump and a guy who walked around with a parrot on his shoulder. All of this is real.

Since Hurricane Maria ravaged Puerto Rico in September 2017, thousands of people have fled the island to come to the mainland. Many of them — some 1,600 families — have been staying at hotels paid for by the Transitional Shelter Assistance program from the Federal Emergency Management Agency. But the program will expire at the end of June. In Florida, about 600 families are in the program.

Should newlyweds combine bank accounts?

Jun 15, 2018

It's wedding season, and while personal finance isn't the most romantic thing, it's important to talk about this time of year.

To get some tips on nuptials and money, we spoke with Beth Kobliner, a personal finance writer and author of the book "Get a Financial Life: Personal Finance in Your Twenties and Thirties." This transcript has condensed and edited for clarity.

If you've heard of Donald Glover, the multihyphenate actor-comedian-producer-writer-musician who also goes by the stage name Childish Gambino, then you're also familiar with the work of filmmaker Hiro Murai. They've collaborated on numerous projects over the last five years starring Glover, including creating the FX show "Atlanta" and the music video for "This Is America." 

China’s government responded quickly to U.S. President Donald Trump’s tariff hike on Chinese goods by announcing Friday it will immediately impose penalties of “equal strength” on U.S. products.

The Commerce Ministry said it also was scrapping deals to buy more American farm goods and other exports as part of efforts to defuse a sprawling dispute over its trade surplus and technology policy.

America's 1998 World Cup disaster

Jun 15, 2018

(U.S. Edition) That's soccer, if you were wondering which one. But first: China is threatening quick retaliation against U.S. tariffs on $50 billion worth of goods. Our Shanghai correspondent will bring us the latest before we shift our focus up north, our relationship with Canadian agriculture. Plus: History seems to be repeating itself for the American soccer team in this year's World Cup.

After the 1994 World Cup, being a soccer player in the U.S. became recognized as a real profession.

The U.S. team had a respectable finish that year, making it to the knockout stage of the tournament despite its defeat by Brazil on the Fourth of July. 

Seattle fought Amazon ... and Amazon won

Jun 15, 2018

The Seattle City Council voted this week to undo a new tax that would have made big businesses pay per employee to generate money for public housing and help for the homeless. Seattle's housing costs and homeless population have both exploded in recent years as the tech industry, mainly Amazon, has brought higher salaries and lots more jobs. But Seattle businesses, including Amazon, pushed back hard on the new tax. One month after it passed, the city council flipped the reset button.

The International Monetary Fund warned this week U.S. tariffs could dent global growth, but according to reports, President Trump is preparing to unveil $50 billion worth of new tariffs on another batch of Chinese imports. If you’ve lost track of what’s covered and what’s not, we’ll take a step back and bring you up to speed. Then, China’s ride-hailing app Didi is the world’s most valuable startup, and it’s now expanding into Melbourne, Australia. Plus, the world’s most expensive movie poster ever sold fetched half a million dollars at auction, but what makes a poster so valuable?

Gas prices are on the rise just in time for summer travel. But will that give drivers second thoughts about hitting the road during the summer vacation season?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

In order to afford a modest one-bedroom rental, an American would, on average, have to make $17.90 an hour. This is according to the National Low Income Housing Coalition. There’s just one problem — $17.90 is far above the federal minimum wage. It means there are a lot of people who can’t really afford their rent. The question is, what other essentials are they giving up?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

ECB to end stimulus. Is Europe's economy out of the woods?

Jun 14, 2018

The European Central Bank announced today it is doing something the Federal Reserve has been doing for several years now: It's taking its foot off the gas pedal of the economy — in this case, the eurozone economy. Specifically, it's ending its practice of buying up bonds. So is the eurozone back on track?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

In the potential tariff war between China and the United States, each state is choosing to protect different sectors. Which is right? And is there a way for a country to engage in “good” protectionism for its own interests?

First off, economists in general agree that tariffs should be avoided because they bring costly trade-offs. If a country taxes imported sneakers, for instance, it helps domestic shoemakers but deprives shoe buyers of the best, low-price kicks.

Sedans; we write songs about them, from the 1964 Impala to a little deuce coupe (OK, that’s a two-door but you get the drift). But it seems we’re changing our tune.

New York attorney general sues Trump Foundation

Jun 14, 2018

President Donald Trump’s charitable foundation served as a personal piggy bank for his businesses, legal bills and presidential campaign, New York’s attorney general said Wednesday as she sued the charity, Trump and three of his children.

The Donald J. Trump Foundation “was little more than a checkbook for payments from Mr. Trump or his businesses to nonprofits, regardless of their purpose or legality,” Democratic Attorney General Barbara Underwood said as she sued to dissolve the foundation and seek $2.8 million in restitution.

The Fed is getting interest rates closer to "just right"

Jun 14, 2018

The Federal Reserve has raised interest rates and set the stage for two more increases in the cost of borrowing this year. Fed Chair Jerome Powell said the economy is getting close to what he considers a "normal level," where the Fed won't have to do as much fussing and tinkering. Marketplace senior reporter Nancy Marshall-Genzer was at the Fed briefing yesterday and spoke about it with David Brancaccio. Below is an edited transcript of their conversation. 

What's the "perfect" U.S. economy?

Jun 14, 2018

(Markets Edition) The perfect U.S. and EU economies are growing in tandem, but America is a bit further along. The European central bank is backing off its stimulus program, while Federal Reserve Chair Jay Powell says the American economy nearing a Goldilocks-esque "just right" level where the bank can stop tinkering. But what's that actually look like? Surely, wages would have to come up, right? Then: A new study says you'd need to make $17.90 an hour to afford a modest one bedroom rental in the U.S. Trouble is, the minimum wage in most of the country is much lower.

This year, the FIFA World Cup soccer tournament is taking place in Russia and more than 3 billion people are expected to watch. Those numbers mean a lot for a pair of brands that have come to dominate marketing in the World Cup: Nike and Adidas. 

With the World Cup, most folks just root for their favorite team, but if you work for either of these sports apparel juggernauts, you’re probably hoping one of the soccer teams your company sponsors makes the final. Denise Lee Yohn, author of "What Great Brands Do," said there's an irony here.

Taking America's temperature on unions

Jun 14, 2018

(U.S. edition) We might hear from the Supreme Court this morning on Janus v. AFSCME, the largest public employee union in the country. At issue: whether workers covered under a union contract should have to pay some dues, even if they're not in the union. While we wait for the decision we'll talk with Craig Helmstetter from APM Research Lab, which just released a surveyed Americans' opinions on the case.

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