Marketplace

Mon-Fri 6:30 - 7:00 pm
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

Hosted by Kai Ryssdal, Marketplace is an in-depth program that focuses on everything from the latest business news both nationally and internationally, the global economy, and wider events linked to the financial markets. The only national daily business news program originating from the West Coast, Marketplace is noted for its timely, relevant and accessible coverage of business, economics and personal finance.

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President Donald Trump has a new trade decision on his plate: whether to impose tariffs on imported washing machines. The International Trade Commission has recommended a 50 percent tax on some foreign manufacturers. This is the type of case with huge political leeway for the president, and other industries seeking protection are watching closely. 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

You might have to eat a few veggies before feasting on carbs and butter and sweets, but we're going to try and serve up a good show for you. We promise. In this case, the vegetables are federal regulations, which might seem super boring but actually affect your life every single day. Case in point: Net neutrality. Federal Communications Commission Chair Ajit Pai is on his way to rolling back virtually all the net neutrality rules his agency put in place just a couple years ago. But before rules become official, there's supposed to be a comment period.

Is it worth commenting on a federal rule?

10 hours ago

The Federal Communications Commission is planning to repeal rules on net neutrality that say internet providers can’t choose to load some websites faster than others. But before the agency could make that announcement, it had to go through what’s called a comment period to release its proposal to the public and then give people a chance to say what think. The agency received a record 22 million comments — some for, some against, some allegedly created by bots. In the end, the agency’s moving ahead with what it initially planned. So why do federal agencies offer comment periods?

News has broken that last year, hackers downloaded the personal information of 57 million Uber riders and drivers from a third-party server. In response, the ride-hailing company paid those attackers $100,000 to delete their copy of the data, and then reportedly tracked them down to get them to sign non-disclosure agreements to keep the breach quiet. While that may have kept Uber out of another PR nightmare — at least for a time — it's definitely not the course of action companies like Uber are supposed to take when something like this goes down.

5 things you need to know about net neutrality

10 hours ago

The Federal Communications Commission announced this week that it has a plan to repeal net neutrality — the idea that all data transmitted over the internet be treated equally, and internet service providers can't slow down or charge different rates for different kinds of data. It affects everything that everyone does online. Marketplace Weekend spoke with Ashley Esqueda, senior editor at CNET TV, about the five things everyone should know about net neutrality. Here's the lowdown:

Today is the last day for people around the world to apply to what’s known as the diversity lottery program. That’s the program that gives U.S. visas to people from countries with low rates of immigration. The recent round of applications is for fiscal year of 2019. The program made recent headlines after a recipient was accused of carrying out a deadly terrorist attack in Manhattan, which prompted calls from President Donald Trump to do away with the program. What would stopping the program do to the U.S. economy?

What do you do when your company has no HR department?

13 hours ago

The man behind so many of Disney-Pixar's animated movies, John Lasseter, is taking a six-month “sabbatical.”

The news comes after he admits he made “missteps” that made colleagues feel “disrespected or uncomfortable.” But it’s not clear what those missteps were.

Cassette tapes make a comeback

14 hours ago

Music fans, who like to impress their friends with their collection of vinyl records, might feel out of step with hip people who are tuned into cassettes, which have made a such a big comeback that manufacturers cannot keep up with demand.

(Markets Edition) Uber has disclosed 57 million riders and drivers were affected by a security breach in October 2016. But what information did the hackers actually get? Bloomberg reporter Eric Newcomer breaks it down for us. Afterwards, we'll talk to Philadelphia Inquirer writer Jane M. Von Bergen about how employees should handle workplace issues when there's no HR department.

S02-3: The peanut butter verdict

15 hours ago

For the past two episodes, we've been telling you the birth story of a single regulation, one of the most pivotal, misunderstood regulations in American history: The number of peanuts that should be in peanut butter. Today, that story comes to an end.

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Uber is coming clean about its cover-up of a year-old hacking attack that stole personal information about more than 57 million of the beleaguered ride-hailing service's customers and drivers.

So far, there's no evidence that the data taken has been misused, according to a Tuesday blog post by Uber's recently hired CEO, Dara Khosrowshahi. Part of the reason nothing malicious has happened is because Uber acknowledges paying the hackers $100,000 to destroy the stolen information.

The revelation marks the latest stain on Uber's reputation.

Black Friday may not be best day for deals

16 hours ago

More than half the respondents in a survey by WalletHub said Black Friday no longer offers the best deals of the year. The personal finance website analyzed ads from major retailers and found that there are a lot of deals on the day after Thanksgiving, but you have to know where to find them. 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

(U.S. Edition) Hackers got access to the personal data of 57 million Uber customers and drivers last year, but the ridesharing giant publicly disclosed the security breach on Tuesday. We'll look at how Uber handled the hack in 2016, and then talk about what this could mean for new CEO Dara Khosrowshahi. Afterwards, we'll look at the unstable future of America's diversity lottery program, which grants visas to people from countries with low rates of immigration.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service…Chinese officials have pressured Apple and Android into removing the chat platform Skype from their app stores  in the country.  Afterwards, as Britain's finance minister  unveils his budget today, we find out about the factors playing into his plans for the UK economy. Then, an internet moderator tells us about what it's like to do one of the most important jobs in technology while still being regarded as bottom of the food chain.

Do people have to be threatened into buying health insurance?

That’s a much more important question now that the Senate Republicans' tax plans include eliminating the Affordable Care Act's requirement that people buy insurance or face fines. The move would give senators an estimated $338 billion in savings to help pay for deeper tax cuts.

The question is: What effect would repealing the mandate have on the effectiveness of the ACA overall?

For a lot of folks, Thanksgiving means family time. And for some folks, family time means board games. AdWeek reports sales of board games are up 28 percent in the last year. We might think of that industry as being very separate from technology. But it turns out, more digital elements are being incorporated into board games. Marketplace’s Adriene Hill talks with professor Mike Sellers, who directs the Game Design Program at Indiana University, about how board games might look in the future.

Time to pay attention to net neutrality again

Nov 21, 2017

The Federal Communications Commission will not uphold Obama-era net neutrality rules. Today, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai asked the commission to adopt a more free-market approach to regulating the internet. Net neutrality is the idea that all data transmitted over the internet be treated equally and companies can't slow down or charge different rates for different kinds of data. On top of all that, the administration is entering into a fight with AT&T over its proposed merger with Time Warner.

How Congress deals with sexual harassment allegations

Nov 21, 2017

As more and more sexual harassment allegations come out against politicians, the question of how governmental bodies deal with these allegations has been raised.

About 60,000 Haitians here in the U.S. are trying to figure out what's next for them. The Trump administration has decided not to renew what's known as Temporary Protected Status for this group. Under TPS, the government allows people already here — because of war, strife or natural disasters in their home country — to stay and work legally. Citizens of 10 countries currently have that status. The Trump administration’s decision to not extend the humanitarian program for Haiti makes it the second country this month to get a heads up that their citizens' time here is running out.

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai said today he's going to ask the commission, which is split along party lines in favor the GOP, to get rid of Obama-era rules around net neutrality and adopt a more free-market approach. The move comes at a confusing time for telecommunications policy in this country, and we'll talk about it. Then: About 60,000 Haitians living in the United States are trying to figure out what's next. The Trump administration said it's not going to renew protections that let people driven out of their homes from disaster or war live and work legally here.

Thanksgiving dinner is cheaper this year — but you might not be feeling it.

The American Farm Bureau Federation pegs the average cost of a Thanksgiving feast at $49.12, a five-year low. The Federation has been doing price surveys on the same list of groceries for 32 years now, tracking the average cost of a modest, traditional meal for 10.

Here's the full shopping list, along with this year's average prices:

Want to see Santa? You better have an appointment

Nov 21, 2017

NEW YORK (AP) — Santa Claus may be coming to town, but you’ll need a reservation to see him.

At Macy’s flagship store on 34th Street in New York, a chance to sit on Saint Nick’s lap is by appointment only this year, for the first time ever.

Starting Monday, eager families can go online to sign up for a time slot from 30 minutes to five days in advance. Admission is free to Santaland Herald Square and runs from the day after Thanksgiving through Christmas Eve.

42: Breaking bread without conflict

Nov 21, 2017

Retired cognitive science and linguistics professor George Lakoff appeared in a previous episode, explaining how your brain reacts to political rhetoric. He's back this week with tips on how to break through to family members this holiday, even if you don't share the same worldview. 

(Markets Edition) Just shortly into the trading day, stocks were up. What's guiding this positive market sentiment? The GOP's proposed tax overhaul. David Kelley from JP Morgan Funds stopped by to discuss whether reform will actually happen. Afterwards, we'll look at how holiday jobs are changing to keep up with online demand, and then we'll talk about the Justice Department's decision to sue AT&T over its planned merger with Time Warner.

Could tax reform lead to millionaire tax flight?

Nov 21, 2017

President Donald Trump promised Americans a “big, beautiful Christmas present in the form of a tremendous tax cut” this year. While the details of the tax reform have yet to be hammered out by the U.S. Congress, some state and local officials are worried that instead of a present the federal government will be delivering them a lump of coal.

FCC targets net neutrality

Nov 21, 2017

The next target of the Trump administration's regulatory rollback appears to be net neutrality. The Obama-era rule that says all internet traffic has to be treated equally. The Federal Communications Commission is expected to release a new net neutrality rule this week reversing that decision.

Here's how net neutrality works. Think of the web as a highway.  Internet service providers like Comcast and Verizon are the on ramps.  Content providers like Netflix are the cars. All going at the same speed.

Holiday jobs changing to keep up with online demand

Nov 21, 2017

Some of the country’s major retail chains are in trouble this holiday season, closing stores and losing evermore sales to online shopping sites. And yet, hiring of temporary seasonal retail workers is predicted to be about on par with 2016, according to a report by outplacement firm Challenger Gray & Christmas.

(U.S. Edition) The Trump administration is now set to roll back network neutrality, which says all internet traffic has to be treated equally. We'll explain how all of this would work. Think of the web as a highway, and content providers like Netflix as the cars who now may have to pay extra for high-speed lanes. Next, we'll discuss the European Union's decision to choose new cities to host two European agencies that had been based in London.

Earnings are out this today for the Campbell Soup Company, and investors are likely to hear more about the company’s move toward plant-based foods. Not only has the company been buying up specialty companies like juice maker Bolthouse Farms, but last month Campbell’s joined a new trade group, the Plant Based Foods Association. What's behind these moves from the company known for its iconic chicken noodle and other soups?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … Tencent — a huge Chinese tech firm that's barely known globally — has jumped in value to over half a trillion dollars to become one of the biggest companies in the world. Afterwards, global food prices could start to rise in 2018 because of uncertainty over climate and trade deals, according to a report out today by Rabobank. Then, in a global first, a London company called Bio-Bean is using coffee-waste powered London buses.

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