Walter Edgar's Journal

All Stations: Fri, 12-1 pm | News & Talk Stations: Sun, 4-5 pm

Walter Edgar's Journal delves into the arts, culture, history of South Carolina and the American South. (A production of South Carolina Public Radio.)

Walter Edgar's Journal, Podcast Archive, May 2008 - August 2014

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DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed on Walter Edgar's Journal are not necessarily those of South Carolina Public Radio.

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Prof. Jon N. Hale
College of Charleston

(Originally broadcast 12/02/16) - Created in 1964 as part of the Mississippi Freedom Summer, the Mississippi Freedom Schools were launched by educators and activists to provide an alternative education for African American students that would facilitate student activism and participatory democracy. The schools, as Jon N.

A business in Rome, GA.
David Mark, via Pixabay [CC0 1.0]

York, SC, Mayor Ed Lee, and Reba Hull Campbell, Deputy Executive Director of the Municipal Association of South Carolina, join  Walter Edgar to talk about the challenges to economic growth faced by small towns in South Carolina, the history of those challenges, and the strategies many are using to promote such growth in the 21st century.

All Stations: Fri, June 23, 12 pm | News Stations: Sun, June 25, 4 pm

"Testament. My last wish..."
Kai Stachowiak/Pixabay [CC0 1.0]

Heirs' property is often land that has been passed down through generations without the benefit of a will so that the land is owned "in common" by all of the heirs, whether or not they live on the land, pay the taxes, or have set foot on the land. 

Mary Alice Monroe
maryalicemonroe.com

Best-selling author Mary Alice Monroe and Rudy Mancke, naturalist, teacher, host of NatureNotes and SCETV's NatureScene, share a deep love of the Lowcountry of South Carolina. They join Walter Edgar to talk about the unique, priceless treasure that is South Carolina's Coastal Plain. 

A History of Beaufort County - Bridging the Sea Islands' Past and Present, 1893 to 2006
University of South Carolina Press

(Originally broadcast 12/09/16) - In the third volume of the history of Beaufort County, Lawrence S. Rowland and Stephen R. Wise conclude their five hundred–year chronicle of the legendary South Carolina Sea Islands. A History of Beaufort County - Bridging the Sea Islands' Past and Present, 1893–2006 (2016, USC Press) begins with the devastating Sea Island Hurricane of 1893, one of the worst natural disasters in American history.

Greenville Chautauqua illustration: Rachel Carson, Cesar Chavez, Maya Angelou, Abraham Lincoln
Greenville Chautauqua

Before radio and television, traveling cultural tent shows toured across America. The original Chautauqua was a road show of music, entertainment, and always a great speaker of the day. At their peak, Tent Chautauquas appeared in over 10,000 communities and preformed for more than 45 million people.

Pamela Strobel
Courtesy of Tim Sulton/Rizzoli

South Carolina native “Princess” Pamela Strobel ruled a small realm, but her powers ranged far and wide. Her speakeasy-style restaurant in Manhattan was for three decades a hip salon, with regulars from Andy Warhol to Diana Ross. Her iconic Southern dishes influenced chefs nationwide, and her cookbook became a bible for a generation who yearned for the home cooking left behind in the Great Migration.

Ron Rash
Penn State, via Flickr [CC BY-NC-ND 2.0]

Internationally renowned author and poet Ron Rash recently donated his personal archive to the Ernest F. Hollings Special Collections Library and the University of South Carolina. Born in Chester, SC, Rash is the author of the 2009 PEN/Faulkner finalist and New York Times bestseller Serena and Above the Waterfall.

Rash is joined by his brother Tom Rash and his sister Kathy Rash Brewer in conversation about the influence of family and place on his life and work.

An advertisement for the fair appears in the Keowee Courier (Pickens Court House, S.C.), October 18, 1905.
South Carolina Digital Newspaper Room/https://library.sc.edu/blogs/newspaper/

Dr. Rodger Stroup, retired Director of the South Carolina Department of Archives and History, is taking a deep dive into the history of the South Carolina State Fair, doing research for an upcoming book on the subject. Stroup talks with Walter Edgar about the history of South Carolina’s fair—which goes back farther than you think—in context with other states’ fairs.

All Stations: Fri, May 05, 12 pm | News Stations: Sun, May 07, 4 pm

Dr. J. Drew Lanham
Clemson University

“In me, there is the red of miry clay, the brown of spring floods, the gold of ripening tobacco. I am, in the deepest sense, colored.” From these fertile soils—of love, land, identity, family, and race—emerges The Home Place: Memoirs of a Colored Man's Love Affair with Nature (2016, Milkweed Editions) a big-hearted, unforgettable memoir by ornithologist J. Drew Lanham.

Requiem for Mother Emanuel: No. 9
Courtesy of the artist

Renowned South Carolina artist, Leo Twiggs, now 82, has long been fascinated by the contradictions of the South, and he has defined a unique iconography in his work by seizing on certain symbols, especially the Confederate battle flag, its stars and bars, the shape of an “X” and the image of a target, with its sequential rings and bull’s-eye.

West Fraser
westfraserstudio.com

Painting the Southern Coast: The Art of West Fraser (2016, USC Press) is a collection of the works of  one of the nation's most respected painters of representational art. A mastery of his medium and the scope of work ensure his place in Southern art history. A true son of the Lowcountry, Fraser has dedicated much of his career to capturing the lush, primordial beauty of the Southeast's coastal regions that have been altered by man and time.

The Way We Worked

Apr 3, 2017
Making coco mats.
DCA&HC McMahan Photo Collection via SC Humanities

The Way We Worked is a traveling Smithsonian exhibit that explores how work became such a central element in American culture by tracing the many changes that affected the workforce and work environment in the past 150 years. Adapted from an original exhibition designed by the National Archives, The Way We Worked shows how we identify with work – as individuals and as communities.

Archaeology trowel
HeritageDaily [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Archaeology in South Carolina: Exploring the Hidden Heritage of the Palmetto State (USC Press, 2016), edited by Adam King, contains an overview of the fascinating archaeological research currently ongoing in the Palmetto State and features essays by twenty scholars studying South Carolina's past through archaeological research.

Charleston, South Carolina, 1865. Broad street, looking east with the ruins of Cathedral of St. John and St. Finbar.
Library of Congress; photographer unknown

South Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction Eras (USC Press, 2016) is an anthology of the most enduring and important scholarly articles about the Civil War and Reconstruction era published in the peer-reviewed journal Proceedings of the South Carolina Historical Association.

Cassandra King
Courtesy of the Author

In the Fall of 2016, the Newberry Opera House, in partnership with the Pat Conroy Literary Center, presented a special night in honor of the late author, Pat Conroy. The evening featured Conroy's widow and fellow novelist Cassandra King interviewed by Walter Edgar, and was presented in benefit of the Pat Conroy Literary Center.

All Stations: Fri, Mar 17, 12 pm | News Stations: Sun, Mar 19, 4 pm

Dr. J. Brent Morris
USC Beaufort

In this final installment of public Conversations on South Carolina: The State and the New Nation, 1783-1828, Dr. Brent Morris, associate professor of history and chair of the humanities at the University of South Carolina-Beaufort, talks with Dr. Walter Edgar about the unification of the slave state in South Carolina from 1783 to 1828.

All Stations: Fri, Mar 10, 12 pm | News Stations: Sun, Mar 12, 4 pm

Dr. Lacy Ford
University of South Carolina

Join us for the third public conversation in a four-part series of Conversations on South Carolina: The State and the New Nation, 1783-1828. Dr. Lacy Ford, Dean, College of Arts & Sciences University of South Carolina and author of Origins of Southern Radicalism: The South Carolina Upcountry, 1800-1860 and Deliver Us from Evil: The Slavery Question in the Old South, will discuss the ideology and public policy of slavery in the American republic.

For the second lecture in this four-part series of Conversations on South Carolina: The State and the New Nation, 1783-1828, Dr. Larry Watson discusses slavery in South Carolina. Professor Watson is Associate Professor of History & Adjunct Professor of History South Carolina State University and the University of South Carolina. He is author of numerous articles on African American life in the American South.

This series of public conversations is sponsored by the College of Arts and Sciences and the Southern Studies Institute at the University of South Carolina.

Peter Coclanis
University of North Carolina

Dr. Peter Coclanis, the Albert Ray Newsome Distinguished Professor & Director of the Global Research Institute at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, joins Dr. Edgar for the first of a series of Conversations on South Carolina: The State and the New Nation, 1783-1828. Professor Coclanis, author of The Shadow of a Dream: Economic Life and Death in the South Carolina Low Country, 1670-1920, will discuss the importance of cotton to the state's economy.

Program Pre-empted

Feb 6, 2017

Please note, Walter Edgar's Journal will be pre-empted February 10 and 12 so that we present a special program.

Dr. Chester DePratter
santa-elena.org

Pedro Menéndez de Avilés, the founder and first governor of La Florida, established several outposts in what is now the southeastern United States. One was at St. Augustine in 1565 and another in 1566 at the former French outpost of Charlesfort, now known as Santa Elena. In total, the colony of Santa Elena lasted for little more than two decades, as the Spanish abandoned the town in 1587.

Detail of a leaf from the "Natural History of Carolina, Florida and the Bahama Islands."
catesbytrust.org

English naturalist Mark Catesby’s love of exploration and learning lives on through a new program, entitled Creating a Better Way to Learn, developed by the Catesby Commemorative Trust in association with local educational entities.

The Trust is working actively with the School of Education at the College of Charleston, SCETV, and curriculum specialists at the Charleston County School District on this program, developing lesson plans and innovative tools that will improve the learning experience for students across South Carolina and beyond.

Marian McPartland and and Dizzy Gillespie during a recording session for "Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz."
SC Public Radio

(Originally broadcast 11/04/16) - In An Encyclopedia of South Carolina Jazz and Blues Musicians, Benjamin Franklin V documents the careers of South Carolina jazz and blues musicians from the nineteenth century to the present. The musicians range from the renowned (James Brown, Dizzy Gillespie), to the notable (Freddie Green, Josh White), to the largely forgotten (Fud Livingston, Josie Miles), to the obscure (Lottie Frost Hightower, Horace "Spoons" Williams), to the unknown (Vince Arnold, Johnny Wilson).

Marlanda Dekine and Scott Neely
Spartanburg County Foundation

Speaking Down Barriers is a non-profit group created by Marlanda Dekine and Scott Neely with a goal to “[transform] our life together across our differences through performance, consultation, trainings, and dialogue.” Dekine and Neely join Dr. Edgar to talk about the program’s efforts and goals.

Sandra E. Johnson
Courtesy of the author

Sandra E. Johnson talks with Walter Edgar about her latest novel, Flowers for the Living. The novel tells the story of how a suicidal African-American teenager's forcing a young white cop to kill him devastates the teenager’s mother as well the rookie cop. It also sparks a massive race riot and puts the mother and rookie in the cross hairs of a deranged gunman.

We Are Charleston

Dec 26, 2016
Bernard Powers, Marjory Wentworth, and Herb Fraizer, authors of We Are Charleston.
Jack Alterman

(Originally broadcast 08/19/16) - This week’s guests on Walter Edgar's Journal are the authors of the book We Are Charleston (2016 Thomas Nelson), a multi-layered exploration of the tragic events experienced by South Carolina’s famed Mother Emanuel in June of 2015.

Garden...and Gun?

Dec 19, 2016
Garden and Gun logo
Garden and Gun magazine

(Originally broadcast 09/03/16) - Yes, Garden & Gun--a magazine that covers “the best of the South,” including the sporting culture, the food, the music, the art, the literature, the people and their ideas. With a national audience of more than one million passionate and engaged readers, the magazine has won numerous awards for its journalism, design, and overall excellence.

The Cantaloupe Thief

Dec 14, 2016

In the new novel, The Cantaloupe Thief (2016, Lion Fiction), protagonist Branigan Powers decides that too many people are staying silent about a ten-year-old murder case. Powers, an journalist, knows a good story when she sees one—and the ten-year-old cold case of wealthy Alberta Grambling Resnick's murder definitely makes the cut. Now Branigan must do some serious digging to get her story.

A History of Beaufort County - Bridging the Sea Islands' Past and Present, 1893 to 2006
University of South Carolina Press

In the third volume of the history of Beaufort County, Lawrence S. Rowland and Stephen R. Wise conclude their five hundred–year chronicle of the legendary South Carolina Sea Islands. A History of Beaufort County - Bridging the Sea Islands' Past and Present, 1893–2006 (2016, USC Press) begins with the devastating Sea Island Hurricane of 1893, one of the worst natural disasters in American history.

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