The World

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  • Hosted by Marco Werman

The World brings international stories home to America. Each weekday, host Marco Werman guides listeners through major issues and stories, linking global events directly to the American agenda.

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Jonathan Drake/Reuters

Here's a question many of us have been debating since the deadly protests in Charlottesville last weekend: What should be done with a monument dedicated to a Confederate figure? Should it be taken down? Or should it be recontextualized? 

It's a question similar to one Paraguayans had to answer not long ago. The debate in that South American country revolved around a statue of longtime dictator General Alfredo Stroessner.

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It didn’t take President Donald Trump long to condemn the terror attack in Barcelona on Thursday. But his follow-up tweet has raised some serious eyebrows among historians, veterans, human rights groups and counterterrorism experts:

Why did ISIS target Spain? The answer may lie in history.

16 hours ago
Sergio Perez

On Thursday, a van ran over pedestrians on Barcelona’s Las Ramblas strip. It took a very short time for ISIS to claim responsibility for the attack.

At least 13 people died and around 100 people were injured.

But why did ISIS target Spain, now, for practically the first time? 

Related: See all the terrorist attacks around the world from 2016

There could be many answers to this question.

The aftermath of the deadly attacks in Barcelona

16 hours ago

Thousands of people marched to the Plaça de Catalunya in Barcelona Friday, chanting “I'm not afraid” in Catalan. It was a show of solidarity after a series of terrorist attacks claimed by ISIS rocked Spain. About 14 people were killed and several more were injured in the tourist-heavy Las Ramblas area of Barcelona when a van plowed into pedestrians. Liz Castro, a writer and longtime resident of Barcelona, witnessed the march on Friday.

Joshua Roberts/Reuters 

Peter didn’t want to use his real name because he’s afraid of becoming a target for white nationalists.

He was one of the counter-protesters in Charlottesville on Saturday — the ones President Donald Trump on Tuesday referred to as “very violent” and “charging with clubs in their hands, swinging clubs.”

I first reached out to Peter in July, over Skype, when I was doing research on a movement called antifa, short for anti-fascist.

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