culture

Dr. J. Drew Lanham
Clemson University

(Originally broadcast 04/28/17) -  “In me, there is the red of miry clay, the brown of spring floods, the gold of ripening tobacco. I am, in the deepest sense, colored.” From these fertile soils—of love, land, identity, family, and race—emerges The Home Place: Memoirs of a Colored Man's Love Affair with Nature (2016, Milkweed Editions) a big-hearted, unforgettable memoir by ornithologist J. Drew Lanham.

A business in Rome, GA.
David Mark, via Pixabay [CC0 1.0]

York, SC, Mayor Ed Lee, and Reba Hull Campbell, Deputy Executive Director of the Municipal Association of South Carolina, join  Walter Edgar to talk about the challenges to economic growth faced by small towns in South Carolina, the history of those challenges, and the strategies many are using to promote such growth in the 21st century.

All Stations: Fri, June 23, 12 pm | News Stations: Sun, June 25, 4 pm

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. We have old fireplaces in our house but use them sparing since the flues haven’t been relined. Our house was built with shallow fireplaces   designed to burn coal, a much more efficient fuel than wood; although it isn’t as immediately gratifying as a blazing wood fire, coal lasts longer and gives more even warmth.

Marlanda Dekine and Scott Neely
Spartanburg County Foundation

Speaking Down Barriers is a non-profit group created by Marlanda Dekine and Scott Neely with a goal to “[transform] our life together across our differences through performance, consultation, trainings, and dialogue.” Dekine and Neely join Dr. Edgar to talk about the program’s efforts and goals.

We Are Charleston

Dec 26, 2016
Bernard Powers, Marjory Wentworth, and Herb Fraizer, authors of We Are Charleston.
Jack Alterman

(Originally broadcast 08/19/16) - This week’s guests on Walter Edgar's Journal are the authors of the book We Are Charleston (2016 Thomas Nelson), a multi-layered exploration of the tragic events experienced by South Carolina’s famed Mother Emanuel in June of 2015.

Garden...and Gun?

Dec 19, 2016
Garden and Gun logo
Garden and Gun magazine

(Originally broadcast 09/03/16) - Yes, Garden & Gun--a magazine that covers “the best of the South,” including the sporting culture, the food, the music, the art, the literature, the people and their ideas. With a national audience of more than one million passionate and engaged readers, the magazine has won numerous awards for its journalism, design, and overall excellence.

Southern Provisions

Nov 21, 2016
Dr. David Shields
USC

(Originally broadcast 01/22/16) -  Southern food is America’s quintessential cuisine. From creamy grits to simmering pots of beans and greens, we think we know how these classic foods should taste. Yet the southern food we eat today tastes almost nothing like the dishes our ancestors enjoyed because the varied crops and livestock that originally defined this cuisine have largely disappeared. Now, a growing movement of chefs and farmers is seeking to change that by recovering the rich flavor and diversity of southern food.

Hobcaw Barony is a 16,000 acre tract on the Waccamaw Neck, between the Winyah Bay and the Atlantic Ocean in Georgetown County, SC. Once owned by the investor, philanthropist, presidential advisor, and South Carolina native Bernard M. Baruch, the property was used as a hunting preserve between 1905 and 1907. It is now owned and operated by the non-profit Belle W. Baruch Foundation as a site for research in the environmental sciences.

Dr. Charles Joyner
Courtesy of Coastal Carolina University

Becoming Southern Writers: Essays in Honor of Charles Joyner (2016, USC Press) is a collection of essays that pay tribute to the late South Carolinian Charles Joyner’s more than fifty years as a writer of Southern history, folklore, music and literature. (Dr. Joyner died on Tuesday, September 13, 2016.) The contributors, exceptional writers of fact, fiction, and poetry, describe their experiences of living in and writing about the South.

Colonial style window
iStock photo © Massimo Fanelli

  The Charleston World Heritage Commission's mission is to nominate iconic buildings and landscapes representative of the Charleston Lowcountry, plantation-driven culture as a UNESCO World Heritage Site – the highest cultural and historic designation bestowed on a place or site.

  In his 40 years as Mayor of Charleston, Joe Riley has led the historic port city through its greatest period of growth, economic development and unity. His authorized biography, The Mayor: Joe Riley and the Rise of Charleston (Evening Post Publishing Company, 2015), is the inside story of his life and how he built -- and forever transformed -- one of the nation's oldest cities.

Southern Provisions

Jan 18, 2016
Dr. David Shields
USC

  Southern food is America’s quintessential cuisine. From creamy grits to simmering pots of beans and greens, we think we know how these classic foods should taste. Yet the southern food we eat today tastes almost nothing like the dishes our ancestors enjoyed because the varied crops and livestock that originally defined this cuisine have largely disappeared. Now, a growing movement of chefs and farmers is seeking to change that by recovering the rich flavor and diversity of southern food.

At the center of that movement is Dr. David Shields, who has spent over a decade researching early American agricultural and cooking practices. Shields joins Walter Edgar to talk about the history of Southern foodways and the current recovery of traditional foods and methods. Shields is the author of Southern Provisions: The Creation and Revival of a Cuisine (University of Chicago Press, 2015).

All Stations: Fri, Jan 22, 12 pm | News Stations: Sun, Jan 24, 4 pm


  75% of all enslaved Africans coming to America came in through the ports of Charleston, Beaufort and Georgetown, South Carolina. The result of this mingling of slaves from West Africa with the plantation culture awaiting them in America became Gullah; the genesis and taproot of African American culture.

The PBS special, Circle Unbroken – A Gullah Journey from Africa to America, portrays the history of these resilient people in music by The Gullah Kinfolk and narrative through the eyes of South Carolinian Anita Singleton-Prather – ‘The First Lady of Gullah™.’ Producer Ron Small and Anita Singleton-Prather talk about Gullah history, culture, as well as the making of this TV special.

All Stations: Fri, Jan 8, 12 pm | News Stations: Sun, Jan 10, 4 pm


At Home - Charleston

Nov 23, 2015
Colonial style window
iStock photo © Massimo Fanelli

  (Originally broadcast 05/08/15 - In Catherine H. Forrester’s At Home-Charleston (Wimmer Cookbooks, 2006), the historic Thomas Rose House serves as the stunning backdrop to the intriguing tales of Forrester’s grandmother Juliette Wiles Staats’ entertaining and the distinctive social traditions of one of America’s most celebrated cities.

Gathering lively tidbits from Staats’ meticulous records—handwritten file cards, detailed party books and hand bound journals, Forrester leads readers into the peninsula’s private world of elegant entertaining. Cathy Forrester talks with Dr. Edgar about the book, her family, and life in Charleston.

All Stations: Fri, Nov 27, 12 pm | News Stations: Sun, Nov 29, 4 pm


Extreme Barbecue

Jun 29, 2015
Dan Huntley
Facebook

---All stations: Fri, Jul 3, 12 pm | News stations: Sun, Jul 5, 4 pm---

 (Originally broadcast 06/29/07) - -- For 24 years, Dan Huntley was a reporter/columnist for The Charlotte Observer. As a recipient of the Knight-Wallace Fellowship at the University of Michigan, he had the opportunity to travel and cook in Buenos Aires, Istanbul, and the Greek Peloponnese. He soon realized that the Carolina pig pickings that he’s done since he was a teenager were part of a much larger food world. He then developed his own barbeque sauce, Carolina Pig Pucker, co-authored (with Lisa Grace Lednicer) a book, Extreme Barbecue, and started a catering business, Outdoor Feasts catering.

In this encore from 2007, Dan talks "contraption cooking" with Walter Edgar.


Between the Waters: North Inlet-Winyah Bay

Feb 11, 2015

In this episode of the Between the Waters podcast, we speak with Wendy Allen, Manager of the North Inlet-Winyah Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR), a state-federal partnership between the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the University of South Carolina.

In this episode, we speak with George Chastain, Executive Director of the Belle W. Baruch Foundation, the non-profit organization and owner of Hobcaw Barony in Georgetown, South Carolina.  Chastain reflects on the Foundation’s history, its mission; and vision as they celebrate their 50th anniversary.

Between the Waters: More with Vennie Deas Moore

Jan 30, 2015

In the final installment of this two part episode, we continue our visit with Vennie Deas Moore at Hampton Plantation, a former rice plantation turned state park located along the South Santee River.  After leaving the African American cemetery located on the property, Ms. Moore shared her interpretive work in the Colonial-era plantation house and the surrounding rice fields.  Afterwards, we journeyed to nearby Germantown, where freedmen and their descendants have lived for generations.  

In the first installment of this two part episode, we speak with cultural historian Vennie Deas Moore at Hampton Plantation, a former rice plantation turned state park located along the South Santee River, roughly nine miles north of McClellanville on U.S. Highway 17.  During our visit, we walked the grounds of Hampton where she shared her experiences as an interpreter and offered valuable insights about the daily lives of enslaved Africans and their descendants at Hampton, and after emancipation, in nearby Germantown, South Carolina. 

Warning: Contains strong language that may not be suitable for younger listeners.  Discretion is advised. This episode of the Between the Waters podcast features a conversation with Harold "Buster" Hatcher, Chief of the Waccamaw Indian People during our visit to the tribe's annual Pauwau in Aynor, S.C.  Join us as we brave the elements to discuss his difficult childhood as a racial "other" in South Carolina, the Waccamaw Indian People's battle for state recognition; and their ongoing efforts to educate the public about their proud history and culture.

In this episode of the Between the Waters podcast, we speak with Lee Brockington, Senior Interpreter of History and Culture at Hobcaw Barony and author of Plantation Between the Waters. Join us as she shares her professional journey, vision for historical interpretation of the property; and initial impressions of our project.

Good Catch
Courtesy of Good Catch

  Bryan Tayara and Dr. John Mark Dean share a passion for sustainable, locally caught seafood. Tayara is owner of Our Local Catch, and Dr. Dean is a Distinguished Professor Emeritus in Science and Ocean Policy with the University of South Carolina's Marine Science Program. They talk with Dr. Edgar about the state of South Carolina’s crabbers, fishermen, shrimpers, and other suppliers.

Bestselling author Ron Rash returns to Walter Edgar’s Journal to talk about his life and work. He’ll also tell Dr. Edgar about The Ron Rash Reader (USC Press, 2014), the 20th anniversary edition of The Night the New Jesus Fell to Earth (USC Press, 2014) as well as his collection entitled Something Rich and Strange (Harper Collins, 2014).

  A product of the industrialized New South, Eugene Healan Thomason (1895–1972) made the obligatory pilgrimage to New York to advance his art education and launch his career. Like so many other aspiring American artists, he understood that the city offered unparalleled personal and professional opportunities for a promising young painter in the early 1920s. Thomason returned to the South in the early 1930s, living first in Charlotte, North Carolina, before settling in a small Appalachian crossroads called Nebo.