education

Mystery Skull

9 hours ago
NatureNotes
SC Public Radio

A listener finds a skull...

"P" is for Pines

9 hours ago

"P" is for Pines. Nine native pine species are found within South Carolina. Three species are restricted to the upper Piedmont and mountain regions, three are found nearly throughout the state, and three are found primarily within the coastal plain. South Carolina pines are divided into white and yellow. Yellow pines have needles in groups of two or three, while white pines have needles in groups of five. The only white pine in the state is the eastern white pine. Among the yellow pines are loblolly, slash, longleaf, Virginia, pitch, pond, table mountain, and spruce.

Unidentified African American soldier in uniform with marksmanship qualification badge and campaign hat, with cigarette holder in front of painted backdrop.
Library of Congress

Upon the United States' entrance into World War I, President Woodrow Wilson told the nation that the war was being fought to "make the world safe for democracy." For many African-American South Carolinians, the chance to fight in this war was a way to prove their citizenship, in hopes of changing things for the better at home.

Count the Birds

Feb 19, 2018
logo for the Great Backyard Bird Count
Audubon Society

This is the last day of the Great Backyard Bird Count. Rudy shares his list, so far.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"E" is for England, John [1786-1842]. Catholic Bishop. Educator. Born in Ireland, England was ordained in 1808. In 1820 Pope Pius VII appointed him the first bishop of the Diocese of Charleston—encompassing the states of North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. He traveled repeatedly to all corners of his huge diocese, established parishes and recruited priests. He was one of the first Irish-American bishops and became an important leader of the Irish community nationwide.

Bird Bones

Feb 16, 2018
A wild turkey.
Alfred Viola, Northeastern University, Bugwood.org

A listener finds large bones in the woods that look like they belonged to a bird. But, what kind?

"D" is for Divorce

Feb 15, 2018
South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"D" is for Divorce. Except for a brief period from 1872 to 1878, South Carolina was the only state in the union that prohibited divorce. The opposition to divorce stemmed from the citizenry’s strong disapproval of government interference in any “domestic institution.” Although divorce was forbidden, South Carolinians were not exempt from desertions, bigamy, abusive marriages, adulterous relationships, and illegitimate children. Desertion functioned as a de facto divorce.

logo for the Great Backyard Bird Count
Audubon Society

Go to birdcount.org to report birds you see in your backyard, February 16 - 19.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"C" is for Catesby, Mark [1682-1749]. Naturalist. Artist. With the financial backing of influential Englishmen, Catesby came to Charleston in 1722 to gather specimens and notes for an illustrated work on the natural history of the Carolina region. In 1725 he left Charleston and journeyed to Florida and the Bahamas. Back in England, he began preparing the plates and text for publication—teaching himself engraving.

Happy Valentine's Day!

Feb 14, 2018
NatureNotes
SC Public Radio

Rudy shares a passage from The Dewy Morn, by Richard Jeffries.

A Southern Yellowjacket.
Bob Peterson (CC BY 2.0) via Flickr

A listener is surprised to see Yellowjackets devouring an animal carcass. Unusual? Not really: Yellowjackets  are omnivorous.

Celebrating graduation at a recent Morgan State University commencement.
Fire Light Media

Film maker Stanley Nelson and Dr. Bobby Donaldson of the University of South Carolina talk with Walter Edgar about the story of historically black colleges and universities in the U. S., and about Mr. Nelson’s film Tell Them We Are Rising: The Story of Black Colleges and Universities which airs on SCETV Monday, February 19, at 9:00 pm, as part of the PBS series Independent Lens.

All Stations: Fri, Feb 16, 12 pm | News & Talk Stations: Sun, Feb 18, 4 pm

George Bradley and Tina Marshall-Bradley, Columbia 2016
StoryCorps

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, an oral history project that collects the voices of our times. At the StoryCorps mobile booth in Columbia in 2016, George Bradley spoke with his wife and colleague Tina Marshall-Bradley about his term as president of Paine College, a historically black college in Augusta, Georgia. Here’s Tina.

Learn more about HBCUs (Historically Black Colleges and Universities) here.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"B" is for Benedict College. A historically black college in Columbia, Benedict was founded by Rhode Island native Bathsheba Benedict. Benedict purchased an eighty-acre tract with the goal of educating recently emancipated African-Americans. Originally named Benedict Institute, the school began with ten male students and one faculty member housed in an abandoned residence. The first students followed a curriculum of grammar school subjects, Bible study, and theology. Later courses were added to train students as teachers and ministers.

SC State Dept. of Education Superintendent Molly Spearman
http://www.mollyspearman.com

For the second time in almost two decades, Allendale County schools are under the control of the State Department of Education. Superintendent Molly Spearman said, when students return to school August 17, they will see the same teachers that were there previously, but will also encounter new faces working with familiar staff. Superintendent Molly Spearman explains how these individuals and the department will work with students, teachers and the community to improve the effectiveness of the schools.

Dr. Walt Tobin has been assigned superintendent of the district.

Derek W. Black on the Tavis Smiley Show in 2016.
Courtesy PBS/Tavis Smiley Show

In many schools across the nation in the last few decades, concerns over discipline have led to so-called “zero tolerance” policies.  USC law Professor Derek Black says suspension and expulsion rates have doubled under zero tolerance policies in the past 30 years.  Texas educator Dr. Nesa Sasser Hartford believes that the policies are justified in three specific areas – drugs, guns and sexual improprieties.

Prof. Jon N. Hale
College of Charleston

(Originally broadcast 12/02/16) - Created in 1964 as part of the Mississippi Freedom Summer, the Mississippi Freedom Schools were launched by educators and activists to provide an alternative education for African American students that would facilitate student activism and participatory democracy. The schools, as Jon N.

Dr. Hossein Haj-Hariri, Dean of the College of Engineering and Computing at the University of South Carolina.
USC College of Engineering and Computing

Technology Giant Siemens Corporation announced recently a technology grant worth nearly $630 million to the University of South Carolina College of Engineering and Computing. Officials say the grant provides computers, robotics, and software licensing as well as hardware to develop a “digital factory innovation lab” where students will model and test systems they may work on in the future. USC President Harris Pastides says students will graduate prepared for the high-tech jobs in the worldwide economy.

Megan Scharett, a new high school graduate from the Lowcountry, looks forward to a career in the food industry.  She has apprenticed with a prestigious restaurant in Charleston and taken many college courses at Trident Technical College through the Youth
Tut Underwood/ SC Public Radio

Today's job market is changing rapidly, and whether the field is health care, advanced manufacturing or information technology, there are high paying jobs for trained workers with a two-year associate’s degree from one of South Carolina's technical colleges. The Youth Apprenticeship Program at the state’s tech colleges acts as a "middleman" between businesses needing trained workers and students looking for meaningful careers. But not just college students.

photo of an old college campus in spring
David Mark, via Pixabay [CC0 1.0]

High schools all over the state graduate students at this time of year. But this time next year, Charleston County will begin graduating some students with a high school diploma and a college associate’s degree at the same time. Following a national trend already begun in other counties, Charleston has approved an “early college” program beginning this fall. According to Charleston County School District official Kim Wilson, the program will start with a class of 100 this fall and add 100 more each fall for the next three years.

"O" is for Opportunity Schools. Dr. Wil Lou Gray, the state supervisor in adult education, created a boarding school for young people who could not attend public school or who had not gone further than the fifth grade. The school opened in August 1921 at the Tamassee DAR School in Oconee County to offer educational opportunities for undereducated young white women. For a decade the school operated during August on the campuses of Anderson, Erskine, Clemson, and Lander colleges. By 1931 it was co-educational and in 1936 the Opportunity School for Negroes opened at Vorhees.

"E" is for the Education Accountability Act of 1998. The Education Accountability Act [known as the EAA] placed South Carolina in the mainstream of education accountability reform. It required the establishment of specific standards in math English/language arts, sciences, and social studies. These standards were to provide the basis for student assessment in grades three through eight as well as a high school exit exam. The legislation also called for end-of-course exams in certain high school courses. The purpose of these tests was to hold students and schools accountable for learning.

Charleston School of Law student Tyler Gilliam rehearses his tax argument with Prof. Kristin Gutting as his partner Anna Boning looks on.  Gutting coached the students to the school's sixth consecutive tax moot court national championship.
Tut Underwood/ SC Public Radio

For a law student, winning a national moot court championship is like winning the Super Bowl.  And Charleston School of Law students recently did it an astounding six times in a row.  Teams of students argue cases in front of judges to simulate situations in a real courtroom – in this case,  it was tax law, though other disciplines of law have their own moot courts.  This year’s winners, Anna Boning and Tyler Gilliam,  have the distinction of being the first team to repeat the feat, and win the competition for the second time. 

"B" is for Brawley, Edward McKnight (1851-1923). Missionary, educator. Born in Charleston, a free person of color, Brawley was educated in Philadelphia and studied theology at Howard University. He graduated from Bucknell College and was ordained a Baptist minister.

Vanessa Torres gets the active participation of her Spanish students at Nursery Road Elementary School.
Tut Underwood/ SC Public Radio

Vanessa Torres is a passionate advocate for teaching foreign language to elementary school children.  She says research proves that early education in foreign languages improves deductive reasoning skills, memory, self esteem and more.  Her enthusiasm in the Spanish classes she teaches is contagious, says her principal, Love Ligons.  And her fellow teachers and students’ parents are not the only ones who have noticed. 

Detail of a leaf from the "Natural History of Carolina, Florida and the Bahama Islands."
catesbytrust.org

English naturalist Mark Catesby’s love of exploration and learning lives on through a new program, entitled Creating a Better Way to Learn, developed by the Catesby Commemorative Trust in association with local educational entities.

The Trust is working actively with the School of Education at the College of Charleston, SCETV, and curriculum specialists at the Charleston County School District on this program, developing lesson plans and innovative tools that will improve the learning experience for students across South Carolina and beyond.

Prof. Jon N. Hale
College of Charleston

Created in 1964 as part of the Mississippi Freedom Summer, the Mississippi Freedom Schools were launched by educators and activists to provide an alternative education for African American students that would facilitate student activism and participatory democracy. The schools, as Jon N.

At a luncheon in Columbia on October 14th, Healing Species, a program using rescue dogs to teach compassion to students in high risk, high poverty schools in SC, was named as the 2016 Dick and Tunky Riley WhatWorksSC Award for Excellence. Former U.S. Secretary of Education and South Carolina Governor Dick Riley presented the award, which highlights innovative educational initiatives throughout the state.

The SC Public Charter School District: An Update

Oct 17, 2016

With 18,500 students in 32 schools, Public Charter Schools in the Palmetto State are making a profound educational impact. New schools are added on a yearly basis and the 2016-17 school year finds a new Superintendent leader, Elliot Smalley. Find out about opportunities charter schools provide and learn about the growth and curricular expansion these schools offer to South Carolina students.

This week's podcast features the audio from the September Carolina Classrooms program which focused on bullying and suicide prevention and how these and other social issues affect student health and the learning process. Guests on this program (available at www.scetv.org/education), in addition to host Dawn Samples, were Alex Karydi, Ph.D., Program Director, SC Youth Suicide Prevention Initiative, and Jan Urbanski, Ed.D., Director of Safe and Humane Schools, Institute on Family and Neighborhood Life at Clemson University.

Pages