food

If you’ve ever traveled overseas, then you may be aware that many countries do not refrigerate eggs like we do in the US.  Have you ever wondered why?  We didn’t always wash our eggs.

Pumpkin Recipes

Nov 8, 2017

Pumpkins are everywhere this time of year!  And they’re such a versatile fall fruit.  When it comes time to carve those scary jack-o-lanterns, don’t throw out the meat and seeds!

Jazz Up Sweet Tea

Sep 11, 2017

Sweet Tea is a staple in the south and whether you like yours as sweet as can be, or half and half, jazz up your sweet tea by brewing a simple syrup additive.  Try Raspberry vanilla sweet tea by heating one cup of sugar, half a cup of water, half a cup of smashed raspberries and one split vanilla bean until the sugar has dissolved.  


The old adage goes, “if you fail to plan, plan to fail.”  And while we don’t generally feel like failures when eating lunch, a little planning can go a long way.  Whether it’s your lunch or bagged lunches for your kids, plan ahead, really far ahead!  Small jelly jars are perfect for freezing soups, individual portions, and one-dish meals.

  

Plant Protein

Jul 19, 2017

Many vegetarians are familiar with the protein dilemma, but as grocery prices continue to rise, we carnivores are also looking for inexpensive alternatives to animal protein.  Meat, eggs, and dairy may be the most obvious sources of protein in your diet, but there are plenty of plant based protein sources to choose from!  And plant based proteins offer more fiber and less cholesterol than their animal based counterparts. 


Real Food Lunches

Apr 5, 2017

Eating healthy at home is a challenge, but it seems like eating healthy while on the go is an almost insurmountable task!  The best defense in the battle of the bulge is a good plan, and bringing a bag lunch to work, or even sending one to school with your kids can be a good way to curb unhealthy habits.  Fresh fruits and vegetables are always a good start to any bag lunch, but proteins can be a little tough. 


When trying to go healthy, there’s usually a list of foods that we try to avoid like fried foods, sugars, and fats, but here are five good for you foods that have a bad reputation.  Many people opt to eat only the whites of eggs because the yolk is where the cholesterol is concentrated, but in moderation, whole eggs are nutritious and contain beneficial vitamins.  When making an omelet try using two egg whites and one whole egg.  


Peanuts
Pixabay.com

    Boiled or roasted? Peanuts were brought to the Carolinas in the Colonial period from Africa, where they were brought from South America by the 16th century Portuguese. University of South Carolina food historian David Shields tells how each place contributed to the way we enjoy peanuts today, and peanut merchant Tige Howie talks about which variety sells best. Either way you like it, the peanut has a mighty appeal to the Southern palate.

  

Ted and Matt Lee
Ovation

  (Originally broadcast 10/16/15) - The Lee Bros., who have popularized Southern cooking with a series of popular cookbooks, television appearances, and articles, are hosts of the new TV series, Southern Uncovered with the Lee Bros. They are also currently are contributing editors at Travel + Leisure and frequently write food stories for Bon Appetit, The New York Times, Fine Cooking and Food & Wine, among other publications. Matt and Ted joined Walter Edgar recently to talk about the new show, Southern food and culture, and their latest projects.

All Stations: Fri, Jan 1, 12 pm | News Stations: Sun, Jan 3, 4 pm


File: Fair Ride
Susanna Berggren

  One of the fall traditions in South Carolina is a visit to the South Carolina State Fair. Part of the tradition for many is eating food that we don’t normally eat. Today we talk with vendors of such delectable – and sometimes weird – foods as elephant ears, chicken with Frosted Flakes, deep fried candy and doughnut burgers, and find out why the South Carolina State Fair is one of their favorite fairs.


Ted and Matt Lee
Ovation

  The Lee Bros., who have popularized Southern cooking with a series of popular cookbooks, television appearances, and articles, are hosts of the new TV series, Southern Uncovered with the Lee Bros. They are also currently are contributing editors at Travel + Leisure and frequently write food stories for Bon Appetit, The New York Times, Fine Cooking and Food & Wine, among other publications. Matt and Ted joined Walter Edgar recently to talk about the new show, Southern food and culture, and their latest projects.

-- All Stations: Fri, Oct 16, 12 pm | News Stations: Sun, Oct 18, 4 pm --

  

  One of the most iconic marketing images in American history is the classic Coca Cola bottle. The familiar design turns 100 years old this year. But most folks don’t know that that familiarity was helped along by the millions of these bottles that were made in Laurens, S.C.


What's the epitome of summer for a lot of Americans? It's communing around a grill, with friends and family, waiting for a slab of meat to cook to juicy perfection.

Extreme Barbecue

Jun 29, 2015
Dan Huntley
Facebook

---All stations: Fri, Jul 3, 12 pm | News stations: Sun, Jul 5, 4 pm---

 (Originally broadcast 06/29/07) - -- For 24 years, Dan Huntley was a reporter/columnist for The Charlotte Observer. As a recipient of the Knight-Wallace Fellowship at the University of Michigan, he had the opportunity to travel and cook in Buenos Aires, Istanbul, and the Greek Peloponnese. He soon realized that the Carolina pig pickings that he’s done since he was a teenager were part of a much larger food world. He then developed his own barbeque sauce, Carolina Pig Pucker, co-authored (with Lisa Grace Lednicer) a book, Extreme Barbecue, and started a catering business, Outdoor Feasts catering.

In this encore from 2007, Dan talks "contraption cooking" with Walter Edgar.


  If there’s one food South Carolinians love, it’s barbecue.  Just in time for July 4 cookouts, we talk with Lake High, barbecue historian and co-founder of the South Carolina Barbecue Association, about the origins of barbecue, the variety of barbecue sauce types enjoyed in South Carolina (more than in any other state), and why, at the growing number of barbecue competitions statewide, South Carolina barbecue judges are the best in the nation.


  “C” is for Chicken Bog. While anecdotal evidence exists that the name chicken bog was related to the “boggy nature” of its home, the Pee Dee region of South Carolina, modern food historians and folklorists offer other explanations. Traditionally, the only ingredients are chicken, rice, sausage, and onions, seasoned with salt and plenty of black pepper. The best chicken to use is an older hen—free range and full of flavor; the second choice is a fat rooster. The chicken is poached, and then its meat is pulled off the bone, not chopped.

When it comes to ways to boost your energy, especially during that mid afternoon slump, think about these energy boosting foods rather than reaching for that fifth cup of coffee or the oh-so-tempting candy bar.

As you traveled our state's highways this past summer, you may have seen billboards announcing South Carolina's “barbecue trail”.  They were part of a tourism campaign that was not only successful but award-winning.

Mike Switzer interviews Duane Parrish, director of the South Carolina Department of Parks, Recreation & Tourism in Columbia.

Our next guest says his mom won't use mobile apps but she will send text messages.  So he designed a messaging service along with a custom built printer that allows her and anyone to text their orders to their favorite restaurants.  And the restaurants, he says, are loving it.

Mike Switzer interviews Greg Oleksiak, co-founder of Eatabit, an order-by-text-message service based in Charleston, SC.

Shitake Mushrooms

Oct 13, 2014

Mushrooms are versatile food sources that can serve as a meat alternative in your low-calorie diet.  Shitake mushrooms are easier to grow than you may think.  You’ll want to start with a hardwood logs like a chestnut or sugar maple, but their favorite hardwood is oak.

  “P” is for Pine Bark Stew. Pine bark stew is thought to have originated as a fisherman’s stew cooked on the banks of the Pee Dee River. In the 1930 edition of Two Hundred Years of Charleston Cooking, Blanche Rhett credits the recipe to Captain John A. Kelly of Kingstree who made it a favorite dish of the Otranto Hunting Club in Goose Creek. The 1950 cookbook, Charleston Receipts agreed, titling its recipe “Otranto Pine Bark Stew.” The reason for the name is speculative. Was it because it was dark in color? Seasoned with a pine sprig?

“G” is for Greens

Sep 30, 2014

  “G” is for Greens. Perhaps nowhere in the United States have greens been so beloved as in the South. And South Carolina has a long tradition of cooking greens—especially collards, turnip greens, and some wild leaf greens. The traditional southern method of cooking collards and turnips is to make a broth with fatback, streak o’lean, ham hocks, or other salted pork or bacon and water. The greens are stripped of tough or yellowed stems and leaves and added to the boiling water.The heat is reduced and the greens left to simmer for up to two hours.

The old adage goes, “if you fail to plan, plan to fail.”  And while we don’t generally feel like failures when eating lunch, a little planning can go a long way.