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“S” is for Sewees

Sep 2, 2014

  “S” is for Sewees. The Sewees were a Native American nation based along the Santee River and the Sea Islands. In 1670 it was the Sewees who showed the English colonists the best harbors. They helped the Carolinians against the Spanish and supplied the settlers with food when the colony ran short. The tribe was decimated by smallpox and by an ill-fated attempt to trade directly across the Atlantic with England. A fleet of canoes was swamped by a storm and many drowned; those that survived were picked up by an English slave ship and sold into slavery in the West Indies.

Making It Grow! host Amanda McNulty talks about the 100 years anniversary of the Smith-Lever Act of 1914 and one of the creators of the federal legislation, Frank Lever.

    

“R” is for Robertson, Benjamin Franklin, Jr. [1903-1943]. Journalist. Robertson was a well-respected and well-traveled journalist and war correspondent and the author of three books. In 1940 he was hired by PM, a newspaper, as its London correspondent during the Battle of Britain. In 1941 he published I Saw England, a well-received account of British resolve during the blitz. After another stint in London, he returned home and began work on Red Hills and Cotton: An Upcountry Memory. During 1942 Robertson covered the war from Libya, the Soviet Union, and India for PM.

“P” is for Pinckney, Maria Henrietta

Aug 25, 2014

  “P” is for Pinckney, Maria Henrietta [d. 1836]. Writer. The eldest daughter of Charles Cotesworth Pinckney and Sarah Middleton, Maria Pinckney is notable for writing a defense of nullification entitled The Quintessence of Long Speeches, Arranged as a Political Catechism.

  “M” is for Medical University of South Carolina. At the request of the Medical Society of South Carolina, the General Assembly established the Medical College of South Carolina. It opened in 1824 as a private institution. In the last two decades of the 19th century, programs in pharmacy and nursing began. The faculty voted to admit women medical students in 1895. In 1913 Dean Robert Wilson campaigned for state ownership of the Medical College, whereby the state would assume some financial responsibility for the school. State ownership was achieved in 1914.

  “L” is for Lott, Robert Bretley [b. 1958]. Author, educator. A native of California, Lott received his MFA from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. Though reared in California, he considers himself a Southerner: “My family is from East Texas and Mississippi—I grew up drinking sweet tea….” In 1986 he became writer-in-residence at the College of Charleston. He began publishing his short stories in 1983—and his fiction and essays have appeared in dozens of literary journals.

  “H” is for Historic Charleston Foundation [HCF]. The Historic Charleston Foundation sprang from the activities of the Carolina Art Association. In 1944, the association published This is Charleston, a survey of historic buildings. In 1947, HCF was incorporated as a separate organization to preserve buildings still occupied by their owners, instead of museums. To raise money, HCF sponsored its first Festival of Homes and saved important structures such as the Nathaniel Russell House.

“G” is for Greene, Nathanael [1742-1786]. Soldier. Early in the Revolution, Rhode Islander Nathaniel Greene became close to George Washington and served on his staff. After the battle of Camden, Washington personally selected him to command the southern army. Taking command in December 1780, he devised a strategy that led to the victory at Cowpens and caused Cornwallis to chase him to the Dan River. At Guilford Court House, Greene’s forces badly damaged the British who limped off to Virginia.

Dr. Melissa Walker is the author of numerous books on the Civil War and is co-editor of Upcountry South Carolina Goes to War (USC Press, 2011). She talks with Dr. Walter Edgar about the role of “plain folk”—especially women—during the war.

This presentation was recorded at the University of South Carolina’s Capstone Conference Center, in Columbia, on January 28, and was part of the series “Conversations on the Civil War, 1864,” presented in January and February, 2014. The series is sponsored by the USC College of Arts and Sciences.

“C” is for Charleston Renaissance [ca. 1915-1940]. The Charleston Renaissance was a multifaceted cultural renewal. Artists, musicians, writers, historians, and preservationists—individually and in groups—fueled a revival that reshaped the city’s destiny. The Renaissance benefitted from a large number of books, many illustrated with paintings and prints by local artists. One story, more than any other, brought national attention to Charleston: the tale of Porgy by DuBose Heyward. It appeared first as a novel, then a play, and, in 1935, as the folk opera Porgy and Bess.

“W” is for Wilson, Charles Coker [1864-1933]. Architect. After graduating from the South Carolina College with a degree in civil engineering, Wilson began his architectural career in Roanoke, VA.  By 1896 he was in Columbia and practiced in the firm of Wilson & Edwards. He was also Columbia’s city engineer and superintendent of the waterworks. Between 1904 and 1907 he made repairs to and rebuilt parts of the South Carolina State House.

"S" is for Seneca, SC

Aug 21, 2014

“S” is for Seneca [Oconee County; population 7,652]. Founded in 1873, as Seneca City, the town took its name from an earlier Indian village and the nearby Seneca River. As was the case with several other upcountry towns, the arrival of the Atlanta and Charlotte Air Line Railroad was responsible for Seneca’s establishment. In 1874, the town was chartered by the General Assembly. Most trains stopped at Seneca, and it quickly became a commercial center, especially for marketing the area’s cotton.

  “R” is for Robert Mills House [Columbia]. A National Historic Landmark, Columbia’s Robert Mills House is most noted for its association with the first American-trained architect and the first federal architect of the United States. Ironically, the building’s architect was best known as the architect of public works such as courthouses and jails—not private residences. Of further significance is the building’s role as the home of a regionally important religious institution—Columbia Theological Seminary-- and as an example of the grassroots historic preservation movement of the 1960s.

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