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How to be a winemaker

Jan 12, 2018

Everyone has a dream job growing up: doctor, vet, ice cream taste tester. But how do you actually get the gig? Marketplace Weekend is looking into how, with the occasional series, How to be a...

Elizabeth Vianna is the winemaker and general manager at Chimney Rock Winery in Napa Valley, CA. She has been in the winemaking business for 20 years -- she started as a harvest intern at Chimney Rock while completing her masters in enology at UC Davis, and became the vineyard's winemaker in 2005. These are her tips for how to become a winemaker: 

Tom Houck leaned toward a window at the front of his coach bus and pointed to the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site on Atlanta’s historic Auburn Avenue. His audience, some 40 college students, peered out at King’s childhood home, his church, his and his wife Coretta’s burial grounds and other landmarks.

“It’s so delightful to have you on our tour,” Houck belted from a wireless headset microphone. “You are in the megacenter of history.”

Ask a Manager: Quitting your job with grace

Jan 12, 2018

Earlier this week, we asked our listeners if it's possible to quit your job gracefully. We got lots of stories and questions in response, from on-the-spot quitters to some who maybe gave a little too much notice before leaving, and got stuck with the projects no one wanted.

Debt burden a worry for many Americans

Jan 12, 2018

The economy is ticking along and investors seem confident but a new report from Creditcards.com has some sobering findings. It says two out of three Americans with debt aren’t confident they’ll ever be able to fully pay it off.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

(Markets Edition) The stock market seems to be doing well, but the bond market — not so much. Chris Low, chief economist at FTN Financial, joined us to explain what could be going on. Afterwards, we'll look at a new report that shows more than half of Americans now live in places where it's more affordable to rent than own a house, and then discuss why so many in the U.S. are struggling to pay back their credit card debt.

Bond prices have been under pressure this week as yields jumped to a 10-month high on a range of factors, including forecasts for better global growth, U.S. tax reform, and reports some nations could scale back U.S. debt purchases. Things have calmed down a bit, and while Allianz Chief Economic Adviser Mohamed El-Erian expects more volatility later this year, he isn’t too worried about what the activity signals for the broader economy. 

Click the above audio player to hear the full interview.

(U.S. Edition) Facebook is making big changes to the content you'll see on your news feed. On today's show, we'll discuss the company's push to prioritize posts that it thinks will spark "meaningful" social interactions. Afterwards, we'll look at Saudi Arabia's decision to open the first car showroom for women, and then talk about the IRS' daunting challenge of implementing the GOP's tax overhaul.

Rent or own? The affordability conundrum

Jan 12, 2018

ATTOM Data Solutions reports that 64 percent of Americans now live in places — mostly big metro areas on the East and West coasts — where it is more affordable to rent than own. That means the monthly cost of a mortgage, mortgage interest, insurance and property taxes on a median-priced home in the area will eat up a larger percentage of the average monthly wage there than paying rent on a typical three-bedroom apartment.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service… A breakthrough in Germany four months after elections: Prime Minister Angela Merkel’s center-right block has made a deal with the center-left Social Democrats, with compromises in sight on migration and taxes. Afterwards, new data from China shows its trade surplus with the U.S. hit a record high last year. We’ll explain what that mean for the two nations. Then,  the bond market caused whiplash for investors this week and though things have calmed down a bit, is more volatility on the way … and would it be such a bad thing?

The twin security flaws called Spectre and Meltdown let hackers take advantage of almost any device with a chip in it and steal data, passwords, keystrokes — pretty much all the things you want to keep private. Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood talks with independent security reporter Brian Krebs, who says that on the scale of one to 10 in terms of how worried he is, this is about an eight. He also says we should patch our computers. We get into the nitty gritty of the hack for our segment Quality Assurance, a second look at the news. 

There's talk on Capitol Hill of a deal to protect the people some immigration activists call "Dreamers."

Under a cloudy sky, Ravi Ragbir quietly reported for his scheduled check-in with immigration authorities at 26 Federal Plaza in lower Manhattan on Thursday morning. It is the same office where he has attended each of his routine meetings for years.

Today, though, Ragbir didn’t walk out.

Like many others, cartoonists are reacting to the anti-#MeToo manifesto signed by 100 notable French women, including film star and sex symbol Catherine Deneuve.

Is "Black Panther" a billion-dollar movie?

Jan 11, 2018

The new Marvel superhero movie “Black Panther” is breaking records — and it's not even out yet. Fandango says the first 24 hours of advanced ticket sales beat the sales for “Captain America: Civil War,” thus setting a new bar for Marvel. Disney, which owns Marvel, has been promoting the movie heavily. But there’s also been a whole lot of grass-roots support for “Black Panther.”

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Here’s a sobering thought: “Studies have shown that as we look out to 2030, global demand for water is expected to outstrip supply by 40 percent,” says Brooke Barton with CERES, a Boston-based non-profit that helps businesses build sustainability into their work, including water conservation.

Right now, that’s a challenge that’s just not on the radar of a lot of companies. 

When we subsidize coal companies, does that make it back to the people living in coal country? In her reporting for Quartz, economics writer Gwynn Guilford found that the answer may be a loud, resounding "no." For her article "The 100-year capitalist experiment that keeps Appalachia poor, sick, and stuck on coal," Guilford reported on the coal mining region of Central Appalachia, near the Kentucky-West Virginia border.

When the world's biggest private employer speaks, people listen, even the White House. Walmart announced this morning it's gonna give some of its hourly workers a one-time bonus of as much as $1,000 and bump starting wages to $11. They also announced layoffs, it should be said. The White House was quick to take credit for the raises, which Walmart attributed to the tax bill. So what does that mean for the tax plan? That's the question that starts off today's show. Then: The Internal Revenue Service released its updated withholding tables today. Sounds like a snoozer, but it's a big deal.

The Trump administration is offering states a path to impose new work requirements for some people who get health insurance under Medicaid, the program that serves 68 million primarily low-income, elderly and disabled Americans. This is a historic shift. Never in Medicaid's 52 years have people had to work in order to get health insurance. Federal health officials Thursday morning said 10 states have requested work requirement waivers that would force healthy, working-age adults to have a job, volunteer or be in school.

A carton of organic eggs can cost more than double the price of regular eggs — so, what are you paying for? When it comes to the treatment of livestock and poultry, there are some murky areas. Many in the organic industry pushed for a new rule, issued at the end of the Obama administration, aimed, in part, at ensuring that the green and white organic seal on the egg carton means the chickens actually spent time outdoors.

The laundry bags kept falling from the stroller onto the uneven and narrow sidewalk. With her daughter, Sedona, strapped onto her back and her son, Adero, in tow, Katerina Barron stood in a sweat, speechless in front of the lavandería attendant. Her husband, Jesus, wasn’t there to translate her questions into Spanish.

It was three weeks since she and her children moved to San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, following Jesus’s deportation.

The highly decorated Ukrainian chess grandmaster Anna Muzychuk says she's boycotting the latest world championship competition because it's being held in Saudi Arabia, where women's rights are severely restricted.

The two-time world champion wrote on her Facebook page that she doesn't want to wear the abaya — the religious conservative covering — and abide by the rules of women's behavior in the kingdom.

Pointedly, she writes that she doesn't want to feel like a "secondary creature."

Major shift as Trump opens way for Medicaid work requirement

Jan 11, 2018

This article has been updated.

WASHINGTON — In a major policy shift that could affect millions of low-income people, the Trump administration said Thursday it is offering a path for states that want to seek work requirements on Medicaid recipients.

Has the #MeToo movement gone too far or not enough?

Jan 11, 2018

France's most revered actress, Catherine Deneuve, declared Tuesday that men should be "free to hit on" women, condemning a new "puritanism" she claimed has been sparked by sexual harassment scandals.

She was one of around 100 French women writers, performers and academics who wrote an open letter in Le Monde deploring the wave of "denunciations" that has followed claims that Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein sexually assaulted and harassed women over decades.

(Markets Edition) As companies start to unveil their final quarterly earnings report from 2017, we'll talk to Susan Schmidt — senior portfolio manager from Westwood Holdings — about retail sales and consumer shopping habits. Afterwards, we'll discuss what the upcoming year might look for the banking industry, and then examine what the Republican tax plan could mean for airlines.

Walmart workers could see their wages go up as soon as next month. The company announced today that it is raising its starting wages to $11 an hour and expanding its parental leave policies. Up till now, Walmart workers were paid $9 an hour to start and then were bumped up to $10 an hour after they completed their training. Workers will also receive bonuses based on the length of their employment, Walmart said.

As Wells Fargo and JP Morgan Chase report earning this week, analysts are looking ahead and anticipating that the tax bill, regulatory rollbacks, and a sound overall economy with low unemployment will mean a strong year for banks.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Yassi Ashki left Iran seven years ago, and she came to the US to study. When she first got to the Indiana University campus, she noticed two things. 

First, "They were all wearing Uggs and pajamas," and at the health clinic, "there was a huge box of free condoms [...] and so many pamphlets about STDs."

Ashki took a couple of the pamphlets about sexually transmitted diseases home. Over the next couple of days, and after she'd gotten her own pair of Uggs and pajamas, she pored over the pamphlets. "I thought I knew everything," she recalls, "but I knew very little."

(U.S. Edition) Coca-Cola has announced its South African divisions will stop working with McKinsey, the world's biggest consulting company. We'll look at the reason behind the soda giant's decision, which has to do with the company's entanglement in a big corruption scandal in South Africa. Afterwards, we'll talk to Ariella Cohen — editor in chief of the online publication Next City — about the lingering effects of redlining on Philadelphia.

A federal policy that began almost a century ago is still harming Philadelphia. Beginning in the 1930s, the federal government encouraged mortgage lenders to withhold credit from areas where people of color or immigrant communities lived — a process that became known as "redlining." While the government eventually passed a measure to get rid of the practice in the 1960s, its effects still linger. 

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service… More trouble for bitcoin: South Korea is mulling a plan to ban cryptocurrency trading in an area of the world that’s seen some of the highest demand. We explain what it means for the future of bitcoin.  Then, peaceful protests have turned violent in Tunisia as anger over government austerity measures heats up. We’ll take you there and explain why protesters are calling the 2018 budget unfair. Afterwards, we’ll explain how one organization in the U.K. is getting women back to work using a model akin to speed dating. 

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