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Tennis pro and Charleston native Shelby Rogers keeps up her practice on a recent visit home.
Tut Underwood/ SC Public Radio

Charleston native Shelby Rogers has risen through the ranks in women’s tennis over the last few years, currently ranking #48.  She started off the year in grand style, defeating the world’s number 4 player, Simona Halep, in the Australian Open.   As she looks forward to returning home to play the Volvo Car Open on Daniel Island this month, she took the time to reflect on the beginnings of her career, her practice routine, and the price she’s paid to be a professional athlete.  

A volunteer's transport van bears the slogan MAMAS on the Move.
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

Many stray dogs from South Carolina are finding homes in other states thanks to Bamberg’s Mary Ann Morris Animal Society, also known as MAMAS.  The no-kill animal shelter has developed a transport system that shuttles dogs to willing owners by way of a “pipeline” of volunteers that relay the animals from North Carolina to Maine and Vermont.  The dedicated volunteers talk about their devotion to saving these pets for new owners who are excited to give them loving homes, and keep in touch with MAMAS to update staff on the lives of dogs they’ve rescued. 

A Kingstree family connecting to doctor at MUSC via telehealth.
Marina Ziehe

In Williamsburg County, finding a specialized doctor can be difficult. Many residents live miles away from a health care provider, going without adequate medical care. A telehealth network was established in multiple sites across the county to help residents access the services they need.

Narrative: Sharing in an Aunt's Historic Medical Career

Feb 28, 2017
Left: Juliette Satterwhite, Right: Maude Callen
Courtesy of Juliette Satterwhite

When Juliette Satterwhite was a young girl, she spent many Sunday afternoons in rural Berkeley County at her aunt Maude Callen's house in Pineville, South Carolina. These family gatherings introduced Satterwhite to the medical work Callen provided to people in the area. In December of 1951, Life magazine published a 12-page photo essay of Callen and work she did. She is credited with delivering some 800 babies. Callen's story is also featured in the new National Museum of African-American History and Culture in Washington, DC.

Sitting at a restaurant on Two-Notch Road in Columbia, I.S. Leevy Johnson, along with family and friends, waited to hear election results. The year was 1970 and later that night, the group celebrated as Leevy Johnson was elected to the state's General Assembly. He, along with two other African-American men, became the first to serve in that office since the end of Reconstruction.

In this edition of Narrative, the Columbia attorney talks about the community effort that helped him win and ultimately add to South Carolina history.

Rainfall from Hurricane Matthew in October 2016 flooded the street and homes in the Pepperhill neighborhood.
Alexandra Olgin/SC Public Radio

Amy Knoch recently moved back into her house. When I visited, she was weaving through a maze of Rubbermaid bins that were stacked in her living room. .

Knoch lifted the lid of one box full of office supplies and the next her child’s toys.

“It’s like an organized version of a hoarder’s house,” she said. “Everything is in bins based on what room it came out of but you have pathways between all of the rooms.”  

She and her family lived in an apartment for three months after flooding from Hurricane Matthew damaged her home.  

The South Carolina House of Representatives Chamber.
Russ McKinney/SC Public Radio

Two key bills are up for debate next week at the State House: road funding and the state pension system.

Jaime Harrison
Provided by Jaime Harrison

UPDATE, 2/23/17, 2:30 pm:

The Associated Press is reporting that SC Democratic Party Chair, Jaime Harrison, has withdrawn from the race for chairman of the Democratic National Committee.

Guy Dozier had to use a kayak to get out of his house when it flooded in October 2016.
Alexandra Olgin/SC Public Radio

Guy Dozier thought he had planned for the worst when he built his two story home 30 years ago. Just a twenty minute drive from Myrtle Beach, his home in Conway is elevated five feet above ground, higher than any anticipated flooding. That is until Hurricane Matthew late last year.

"It was just one more dirty stinky nasty mess," Dozier said.

kerttu/pixabay

As times and technology evolve, so does crime.  Members of the Midlands Gang Task Force, a union of specialists from the Richland and Lexington County Sheriff’s Offices, the Columbia, Cayce and West Columbia Police Departments and more, see the methods of area gangs change from drug and violent crime, increasingly to white collar crimes such as tax and insurance fraud and identity theft.

Travel, history, ghosts and more are among the many subjects of the USC Press' books
Tut Underwood/ SC Public Radio

The Palmetto State has a prestigious name in the world of publishing: the University of South Carolina Press. Because it’s a non-profit, it can publish scholarly books on important subjects that would not make a profit for commercial publishers, according to Suzanne Axland. But that doesn’t mean the press doesn’t publish for the general interest. It prints a wide variety of books on art, history, Southern culture, beautiful photography and more, even novels, says Axland.

Controversial bills dealing with concealed weapons and the legal processes surrounding controversial development projects are advancing in the S.C. General Assembly.

International Non-Profit Lends a Hand Close to Home

Feb 16, 2017
A tap stand being set up in Columbia.
Jennie Reeb/Water Mission

Water Mission is a non-profit based in Charleston focused on helping developing nations restore access to clean water, particularly following natural disasters. The group has projects around the world including Peru, Indonesia, and Kenya. In 2015, they used their purifying technology to help a city closer to home: Columbia. Cooper McKim has the story.

Mopeds at Hawg Scooters, Rosewood Drive, Columbia. 2.	More South Carolinians are riding mopeds, and there are numerous reasons why.
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

On any day in any college town across the state a multitude of students can be seen negotiating the streets on mopeds. But they are by no means the only riders. The use of these low-power scooters is exploding across South Carolina, and the nation. Today we talk with two dealers who explain the phenomenon, as well as a rider who tells of the advantages he gets from his moped.

More and more, boxes and crates of fresh produce leaving the Palmetto State for stores and markets in other states are bearing an increasingly familiar sticker: "Certified South Carolina Grown." Ansley Turnblad, branding coordinator for the S.C. Dept. of Agriculture, says the brand encourages people to look for, ask for and buy South Carolina produce.

S.C. Medical Universities Teach Telehealth to Students

Feb 16, 2017
Students examining telehealth equipment at MUSC.
Taylor Crouch

Faced with a changing healthcare landscape, medical schools across the state are implementing telehealth education to their curriculum. The American Medical Association supports telehealth training for future medical professionals, and encourages the adoption of innovative programs that may improve the way care is delivered to communities across the country.​

Union holds rally ahead of Boeing vote

Feb 14, 2017
Photo Courtesy of The Boeing Company

The International Association of Machinists union is in the final stretch of its campaign for workers to organize at Boeing. Monday afternoon workers and union supporters gathered at a North Charleston hotel two days ahead of the vote.

38-year-old quality inspector at Boeing Lawrence Lynch is optimistic about a union win. 

“There are numerous things that are wrong that workers at Boeing have asked the leadership to change or look into and sometimes they blatantly just ignore everything.” said Lynch. “That is the reason I am voting yes for the union,”

Tele-Stroke Expands Stroke Treatment in South Carolina

Feb 10, 2017
Brain scan of stroke patient.
Taylor Crouch

When it comes to stroke treatment, “time is brain.” Emergency departments across South Carolina are adopting tele-stroke as an important component of patient’s stroke care by helping emergency teams to rapidly evaluate and treat stroke patients.  

Gavin Jackson/SCETV

Governor Henry McMaster says he will support a gas-tax funded roads bill only "as a last resort," and the General Assembly advances legislation to fix the state's ailing pension system.

Food tourists get good food and a history lesson during a food tour on Columbia's Main Street.
Tut Underwood/ SC Public Radio

While most folks know that tourism is one of South Carolina’s top industries, many do not know that food tourism is a growing phenomenon around the state.

Visualizations by Ernie Wright / NASA/GSFC

It may be winter now, but big plans are being made for this summer, when portions of South Carolina will see something that hasn’t occurred here in nearly a century: a total solar eclipse.  NASA has estimated nearly one million people will come to the Palmetto State to view this exciting phenomenon.  Midlands tourism spokesperson Kelly Barbery says Columbia is well positioned to get the longest exposure to the eclipse – just over two and a half minutes – and as the third largest city in America in the eclipse’s path, it is preparing activities for the many visitors it expects. 

State House Rally Draws Passion and Skepticism

Feb 3, 2017
View of the statehouse rally
Thomas Hammond

As rush hour arrives in downtown Columbia, cars honk in response to protesters filling the sidewalks with their signs at the ready: We are All Immigrants, Humanity has No Borders, and Spread the Love. Protesters are here in response to President Trump's recent ban on refugees and travel restrictions on seven predominantly Muslim countries. Cooper McKim reports the protest drew passion as well as skepticism.

More dire warnings on the status of S.C. roads and highways as the General Assembly begins considering road funding measures again this session.

The Mufuta family arrived in Charleston one week ago, less than 24 hours before the temporary refugee ban. From left to right: 30-year-old Bakemayi Mufuta, 3-year-old Georgina Mufuta, 6-year-old Promise Mufuta, and 23-year-old Rose Mufuta.
Vanessa Gongora

Hayat Qteifan is teaching Congolese refugee Rose Mufuta how to bake in her new North Charleston apartment.

“So you want to fill it up about two thirds of the way so that is has enough room to rise,” Qteifan said.  

Mufuta who arrived in the United States one week ago, wants to be a baker. This is the first time she is using an oven to make cupcakes. The women are using a spoon to put vanilla batter into a tin.

By the Numbers: Table shows progress of the state's 2015 flood recovery program to date
SCDRO

As of January 31, the South Carolina Disaster Recovery Office has awarded 44 award letters to households with damage from the 2015 rain event and flood. To date, the office has allocated a little over $1.4 million of its nearly $97 million of disaster recovery funds.

Households in Florence, Georgetown, Sumter, Williamsburg, Berkeley, Clarendon and Orangeburg counties now have information letting them know they have been accepted into the states disaster recovery program.

Columbia Mayor Steve Benjamin: State of City is Strong

Feb 1, 2017
During his State of the City Address, Tuesday, Columbia Mayor Steve Benjamin used the Virtual Inter-Columbia Intelligence (technology acquired from the Department of Defense surplus program) to highlight the city's strengths.
Thelisha Eaddy/ SC Public Radio

During his annual city address, Columbia Mayor Steve Benjamin said the state of the city is strong. Using technology acquired from the Defense Department's Surplus program, Mayor Benjamin highlighted the city's 3.8% unemployment, the creation of nearly 10,000 jobs within the past year and progress in continuing recovery efforts following the 2015 flood.

One SC Fund Announces Phase Five of Grant Awards

Jan 31, 2017
In October 2016, Bank of America Employees volunteered with United Way of Midlands, Central South Carolina Habitat for Humanity and Home Works of America to repair siding on a flood-damaged home in Columbia.
Thelisha Eaddy/ SC Public Radio

Eight nonprofit organizations will receive $380,000 to continue recovery work for damages caused by the 2015 flood as well as Hurricane Matthew. Grant money will help organizations purchase building materials, do general rebuild work, mold remediation and supply home furnishings. South Carolina Public Radio spoke with Jim Powell, Director of Development for Home Works of America, and learned how this round of funding will allow the organization to continue to help the most vulnerable in the Charleston area.

South Carolina Burn Center Reaches Distant Patients Through Telemedicine

Jan 31, 2017
Pediatric burn physicians consulting remotely with patient through telemedicine cart.
Taylor Crouch

Even though burns are a leading pediatric injury in South Carolina, there is only one burn center in the state. At the Medical University of South Carolina they see patients from all parts of the state. Most recently, some of the patients do not have to travel as far, as the hospital has been expanding the use of remote consultations using telemedicine.

Tattoos are a growing trend among people from many walks of life in South Carolina.
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

Since tattoo parlors became legal in South Carolina in 2006, they have ridden a growing wave of popularity.  No longer the province of sailors or convicts, tattoos are being worn by doctors, ministers, even grandmothers.  Tattoo artist Scot “Spyder” Kudo says the range of tattoo designs is as endless as the imaginations of his clients. 

Dr. Nori Warren loves caring for pets at 4 Paws Animal Clinic. Forced to relocate by the historic flood of 2015, she hopes to return to a new building near the original clinic later this year.
Tut Underwood/ SC Public Radio

After the historic flood of October 2015 destroyed the 4 Paws Animal Clinic in the Columbia suburb of Forest Acres, a friend came to the rescue with a temporary site for the business.  Dr. Nori Warren and her husband, Will, immediately began planning to a return to their original building, which was still structurally sound. 

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