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Evacuation Route image
DHEC

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predicts an above-normal hurricane season with 11 to 17 named storms. Five to nine of those STORMS could potentially become hurricanes. During Hurricane Matthew in 2016, less than 200 people used the state’s special medial-needs shelters. Officials with the state’s department of health and environmental control, (DHEC) are now working to learn more about the medical needs of coastal residents to better help them prepare for the next major storm.

Dr. Hossein Haj-Hariri, Dean of the College of Engineering and Computing at the University of South Carolina.
USC College of Engineering and Computing

Technology Giant Siemens Corporation announced recently a technology grant worth nearly $630 million to the University of South Carolina College of Engineering and Computing. Officials say the grant provides computers, robotics, and software licensing as well as hardware to develop a “digital factory innovation lab” where students will model and test systems they may work on in the future. USC President Harris Pastides says students will graduate prepared for the high-tech jobs in the worldwide economy.

Artist Peter Lenzo with a collection of his sculpture at his home in Columbia, SC.
Makayla Gay / South Carolina Public Radio

South Carolina artist Peter Lenzo creates masterful sculpture that has gained the attention of collectors from across the country. His work draws inspiration from the traditionally African American art of face jugs and is currently on display at Columbia's If Art Gallery.

Charleston Forum Commemorates the Emanuel 9

Jun 20, 2017
A panel discussion at the Charleston Forum on Race on Friday, June 16, 2017.
Tara Spurling Photography

On the night before the second Anniversary of the June 15, 2015 mass shooting that took the lives of nine worshippers at Emanuel AME church in Charleston, Reverend Eric Manning led the opening prayer at the Charleston Forum on Race. The forum is part of a series of events this month to commemorate the Emanuel 9 and to honor those who survived. In addition to remembering those who died, panel members discussed issues brought to greater attention because of the tragedy. South Carolina Public Radio's Laura Hunsberger has more on the story.

Laura Wright of Saluda (right), just turned 111 years old.  Her "baby sister," Annie Belle Chappelle, is 96.
Tut Underwood/ SC Public Radio

Laura Wright of Saluda recently celebrated her 111th birthday.  Friends and relatives, including her 96-year-old "baby sister," gathered to pay tribute to her long and well-lived life.  A teacher for decades, Wright said her parents prepared and encouraged her and her siblings to get an education and contribute to society.   Her friend Costena Kelly cited "Miss Laura" as a role model, saying "She always said 'be a lady.

Joseph Rackers and Marina Lomazov
Courtesy of the Artists

This week an internationally-acclaimed music event takes place in Columbia: The Southeastern Piano Festival, created and produced by University of South Carolina music professors Joseph Rackers and Marina Lomazov.  Though its name sounds regional, in reality it draws high school applicants and world-class judge/performers from all across the United States and beyond.  The producers tell us how they conceived the festival 15 years ago, and what attracts the finest applicants to vie for the 20 spots that the competition accepts.

Jesse Colin Young still tours and records music, but a half-century after the Summer of Love, he's still proud of the Youngbloods anthem of peace, "Get Together."
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

June 1967 heralded the Summer of Love, when tens of thousands of America’s young people headed to San Francisco with flowers in their hair. The Monterrey Pop Festival was the first major rock event of its kind, and brought wider attention to emerging artists such as The Who, the Jimi Hendrix Experience and Big Brother and the Holding Company, with its electrifying singer, Janis Joplin. USC historian Lauren Sklaroff says San Francisco had long been a place where people who felt like outsiders could gather with others like themselves.

Not leaving a will is considered the biggest "sin" of estate planning.  Even an online form, not the best of ideas, is better than no will at all.
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

Perhaps as much as 50 to 60 percent of South Carolinians do not have a will.  According to attorney Bert Brannon, a will is a person’s last chance to say what he or she wants to happen to his/her possessions, so it should be taken seriously.  Brannon and Richland County Probate Judge Amy McCullough name some reasons why people put off making a will, and why not leaving a will is a really bad idea.  While It has no effect on the deceased at all, it can cause untold distress and trouble for those left behind.

Aerial view of the Charleston, S.C. area, Oct. 5, 2015.
U.S. Coast Guard/Petty Officer 1st Class Stephen Lehmann

The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) will conduct a survey in June and July to assess the medical needs and emergency preparedness plans of coastal county residents. 

"The goal of this survey is to determine just how well-prepared people are for emergencies and to provide information to develop or enhance their individual emergency plans," said Jamie Blair, Deputy Director of the DHEC Office of Public Health Preparedness. "By knowing on the front end if residents in an area may require special attention we are more aptly prepared to serve."

Last month, Richland County began accepting applications for the Returning Home program, which will use funds from the CDBGR-DR (Community Development Block Grant - Disaster Recovery) to assist residents who lost their homes in the 2015 Floods. The county is accepting applications through June 15 (or until they receive 600 applications). To assist residents in completing the application, four community meetings are scheduled in June.

Gilles Vonsattel
gillesvonsattel.com

South Carolina Public Radio’s Bradley Fuller talks with pianist Gilles Vonsattel, who is performing in the Spoleto Chamber Music Series. In recent year Vonsattel has made his Boston Symphony, Tanglewood, and San Francisco Symphony debuts, while performing recitals and chamber music world-wide. He is a newcomer to the Spoleto Festival, and he discusses his upcoming performances of Wilhelm Friedrich Ernst Bach “Das Dreyblatt” for Six Hands (Chamber Music Program X) and Thomas Adès “Catch”(Program XI).

Joshua Roman
Hayley Young

Joshua Roman's versatility and adventurous spirit as both a cellist and a composer have gained international attention. He performs his own composition, Riding Light, at the 2017 Spoleto Festival USA Chamber Music Series. He talks with Bradley Fuller about the piece, about the challenges of playing his own work, and about why he calls himself a "curator."

A still from Mighty Like a Moose, staring Charley Chase.
Spoleto Fesitval USA

Pianist Stephen Prutsman is well known to chamber music audiences at Spoleto Festival USA. This year, in addition to playing at the Bank of American Chamber Music Series, he will also be conducting his original scores—with select members of the Spoleto Festival USA Orchestra—for three silent film shorts from the 1910s and ‘20s.

The Rolston String Quartet: Jonathan Lo, Cello; Hezekiah Leung, Viola; Jeffrey Dyrda, Violin; Luri Lee, Violin.
rolstonstringquartet.com

First Prize winner of the prestigious 2016 Banff International String Quartet Competition, the Rolston String Quartet has become Canada's newest ensemble attracting attention on the international stage.  As Germany's Südwest Press stated of their recent performance, "an impressive, deeply serious interpretation...highly sensitive, delicately transparent. A musical sound treasure, blissful."

Cellist Jonathan Lo talks with Bradley Fuller about the quartet's performances at the 2017 Spoleto Festival USA Chamber Music series.

Fire Ants
Marufish via Flickr [CC BY-SA 2.0]

    Fire ants are a perennial problem in the South, and in South Carolina, but science is working to control them.  Aiken County Clemson Extension Agent Vicki Bertagnalli and former Richland County Clemson Extension Agent Tim Davis both have tested ant baits before they were marketed, and say they can be 85-90 percent effective in controlling fire ants when used in the spring and fall. 

Rachel Troublefield
racheltroublefield.com

17 Hours is a new American musical written by and featuring Nashville recording artist, South Carolina native, and College of Charleston Alumna Rachel Troublefield (2010).

Druid's Aaron Monaghan, Garrett Lombard, and Marty Rea in Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot; Druid Artistic Director Garry Hynes brings this production to the Dock Street Theatre through June 11, 2017.
Matthew Thompson

Director Garry Hynes and her Irish theater company Druid bring to Spoleto a fresh take on Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot, the quintessential 20th-century play about life’s great questions. Shane Stephens is the Irish Consul General in Atlanta. He tells Jeanette Guinn that he's in Charleston to be a "cheerleader" for Druid's Spoleto Festival USA production. Stephens sees Beckett as "deeply European," but, "inherently an Irish writer--but not what you'd expect..." 

Marcus Amaker
Reese Moore

The 2017 Piccolo Spoleto Festival is presenting the world premiere of a jazz setting of the poetry of Marcus Amaker, the first poet laureate of Charleston. The In-Between, featuring classical soprano Jill Terhaar Lewis, saxophonist Robert Lewis, and pianist Gerald Gregory, explores repertoire that resides in and in between classical and jazz genres. Joined by Amaker, the musicians will perform new versions of Amaker's poems. The performance takes place June 5 at the City Gallery.

Columbia Moves Closer to 100% Renewable Energy

May 31, 2017
Columbia Mayor Steve Benjamin is one of 26 mayors to particpiate in the Sierra Club's Ready for 100 Campaign
Thelisha Eaddy/ SC Public Radio

Columbia Mayor Steve Benjamin is one of over 60 mayors across the U.S. who has joined with the Sierra Club's Ready for 100 Campaign. The goal is to get 100 cities to switch from fossil fuel to clean energy. During a press conference Wednesday, Mayor Benjamin said decisions made by President Trump highlights the need for local governments to work together on environmental policy making.

"It only underscores the importance of the true leadership at every level of government, pushing to make sure that we hand over to our children the country and the world that they deserve."

Geoff Nuttall, Artistic Director of the Bank of America Chamber Music Series at Spoleto Festival USA.
Julia Lynn Photography

Spoleto Chamber Music Series Director, Geoff Nuttall, also plays in many of the 33 concerts in which he acts as host. Geoff finds it particularly challenging to jump from his role as MC into the chair of first violinist for the St. Lawrence Quartet. Geoff talks with Bradley Fuller about how "old music speaks and benefits from being pushed up against new music, and vice versa."

Festival Resident Conductor and Director of Orchestral Activities John Kennedy leads the Spoleto Festival USA Orchestra.
Julia Lynn, 2015

John Kennedy is a familiar face at Spoleto Festival USA. As Resident Conductor and Director of Orchestral Activities, John has a pivotal role some of the festival's biggest performances. He talks with Bradley Fuller about the opera Quartett, Mahler's 4th Symphony, his love of Charleston, and the atmosphere of Spoleto USA.

Jaroslaw "Jarek" Kapuscinski
music.stanford.edu

Jaroslaw "Jarek" Kapuscinski is this year’s composer-in-residence for the Spoleto Festival’s Chamber Music Series. With a strong interest in technology, Jarek takes his work beyond mere notes on a page to create a multimedia experience. He tells Bradley Fuller that a childhood dream of being a sorcerer, a life long devotion to music, and his discovery in his early twenties of computer technology, all combine in his multi-media performances.

Manny Houston
YouTube/Creative Commons

Jeanette Guinn talks with Charleston musician Manny Houston about Take Me to Church​, a Piccolo Spoleto event taking place Wednesday, May 31, 6:00 p.m., at the City Gallery.  The program is billed as "an all ages, cabaret styled, exploration in gospel music and traditional Broadway show tunes."

Megan Scharett, a new high school graduate from the Lowcountry, looks forward to a career in the food industry.  She has apprenticed with a prestigious restaurant in Charleston and taken many college courses at Trident Technical College through the Youth
Tut Underwood/ SC Public Radio

Today's job market is changing rapidly, and whether the field is health care, advanced manufacturing or information technology, there are high paying jobs for trained workers with a two-year associate’s degree from one of South Carolina's technical colleges. The Youth Apprenticeship Program at the state’s tech colleges acts as a "middleman" between businesses needing trained workers and students looking for meaningful careers. But not just college students.

Jovial Joe Pinner has been a familiar face, and voice, in South Carolina broadcasting for more than a half century.
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

Joe Pinner has been a fixture on South Carolina television since 1963. He's known from one end of South Carolina to the other - and beyond, not only as a weatherman and familiar children’s show host "Mr. Knozit" for 37 years, but as a commercial spokesman and emcee at scores of parades and festivals statewide. Today Pinner, who still pitches in at WIS-TV on Fridays at age 80-something, talks about his beginnings in radio, how he developed his familiar, booming voice, and the origins of the Knozit show.

Na Fidléirí.
Taylor Music Group

The Taylor Music Group will present two concerts as part of the 2017 Piccolo Spoleto Festival's Celtic Art Series.  Mary Taylor leads Na Fidléirí ("the fiddlers") in Something Old, Something New! at the Ciruclar Congregational Church, June 5 and June 9. Robert Taylor conducts the Taylor Festival Choir in a program titled Hope and Healing at St. Phillip's Church, June 9 and 10.

Dancer Bill T. Jones, one of the performers in David Michalek's moving-image installation Slow Dancing, which will be shown May 27 through June 8 nightly from 9:00pm to 11:00pm in Marion Square, Downtown Charleston.
Spoleto Fesitval USA

Nigel Redden, General Director of the Spoleto Festival USA, talks with Jeanette Guinn about the extraordinary range of offerings for 2017. 

Anita Singleton-Prather at SC Public Radio Studio
Thelisha Eaddy/SC Public Radio

 Several sites in Beaufort County are now a part of the National Park Service. These sites include Darrah Hall and Brick Baptist Church (within the Penn School National Historic Landmark District); the Camp Saxton Site, on U.S. Navy property in Port Royal; and The Old Beaufort Firehouse  located in the midst of downtown Beaufort.

Memorial Day weekend, visitors to the Annual Original Gullah Festival in Beaufort, will have the opportunity to learn about the importance of these places.

The first historic home to be given city approval to elevate to meet flood requirements sits near Colonial Lake in downtown Charleston.
Alexandra Olgin/SC Public Radio

Jack Margolies is somewhat of a pioneer in Charleston historic preservation circles. He is the first to get approval to elevate his 1859 two-story yellow home to meet flood requirements.

“Basically they’re going to jack it up," he said. "They’ll put rods underneath house and all the rods will be synchronized to go up certain height at same time.”

Margolies got the go ahead by the Board of Architectural Review– a body that ok’s any changes to historic homes. This is the second time he has tried to get approval to elevate his home. Margolies believes this year he had the right circumstances because much of his home was destroyed during a fire and the place required major construction. 

Under the approved elevation proposal he will be raising his home about two more feet which includes altering the red brick steps and iron banister that lead to his Charleston style southern facing piazza. But he’s is careful to explain that the entrance will look straight out of the 19th century.

“An expert could come by and could possibly notice the difference. But the average tourist walking by the average Charlestonian wouldn’t notice any difference.”

Lexington Rep. Rick Quinn, (R) talking with news reporters at the Richland County Courthouse in Columbia
Jim Covington/SC Public Radio

For the past three years a special state prosecutor has been methodically conducting a corruption probe involving members of the S.C. General Assembly. To date, four sitting legislators have been indicted. The indictments so far involve violations of state ethics laws, and the reporting of income and campaign contributions. Some say these laws are so weak that they allow lawmakers to skirt them and use their offices for personal financial gain.

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