SC News

News from and about the Palmetto State.

Columbia Canal Rebuild Could Be Years Away

Aug 29, 2017
View of the Columbia Canal from Riverfront Park
Laura Hunsberger

During the 2015 floods, the Columbia Canal breached at the Congaree River. It took the National Guard and a team of engineers days to build a temporary dam and secure the city’s water supply. In the months that followed, the City of Columbia began considering how to rebuild the canal and make improvements, a process that is still ongoing.

Prior to May, 2017, about 500 pelican nests, and those of other seabirds, were established on Crab Bank near Charlestons Shem Creek.
Courtesy SC Dept. of Natural Resouces.

Last spring, there were approximately 500 pelican nests on Crab Bank, a sandbar near Charleston’s Shem Creek where pelicans and other seabirds have safely bred for years.  Erosion has gradually reduced the area of Crab Bank, but a storm and high tides in May combined to nearly obliterate the breeding ground.  Now only about 45 pelican nests remain, with no nests left of the roughly 1000 terns that also nested on the bank. 

Lexington County Flood-damged home being rebuilt to new elevation guidelines
Thelisha Eaddy/ SC Public Radio

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development allocated an additional $5 million to Lexington County REBOUND (REBuilding Our Neighborhoods after Disaster), the County's Community Development Block Grant – Disaster Recovery program (CDBG-DR). REBOUND is designed to address the unmet needs of people whose property sustained damage during the October 2015.

"Some of the remaining flood issues are just those homes," said County spokesperson Harrison Cahill. "We still have some people who are out of their homes."

The world's hottest pepper- the Carolina Reaper, grown in Fort Mill.
Tut Underwood/ SC Public Radio

Many people distinguish themselves in the worlds of sports, entertainment, writing and other endeavors.  Ed Currie of Fort Mill has distinguished himself in a much hotter manner:  he holds the Guinness world record for the hottest pepper on earth, his self-developed Carolina Reaper.  He grows many varieties of peppers for the food industry, but it’s the Reaper that makes some hot-sauce aficionados rethink how tough they are.  In addition to setting people’s insides on fire, however, Currie says the pepper has other uses in the paint, medical and defense industries.

SCEMD Monitors Potential Tropical Cyclone

Aug 28, 2017
Possible track of PTC 10, 08-28-17.
National Hurricane Center

The South Carolina Emergency Management Division is monitoring Potential Tropical Cyclone 10, which could affect parts of the state's coast.  As a result of the storm's projected movement up the east coast, key local and state agencies have been notified to be ready to respond if the need arises.

Mike Oreskes
www.npr.org

If you think local journalism has declined in recent years, you’re not alone. Mike Oreskes is head of news at NPR. During a recent trip to South Carolina, he spoke with South Carolina Public Radio's Thelisha Eaddy about increasing journalism collaboration between member stations. The senior vice president wants to strengthen each station, increase state news coverage and create a true news network for public radio.

  

Bicycle racers from around the world fly through the air as part of the BMX World Championships held recently in Rock Hill.
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

Rock Hill has enjoyed a growing reputation as an amateur sports Mecca, and the city recently proved it by hosting the BMX (bicycle motocross) world championship competitions.  Men, women and children came from across the globe to compete, and the event drew 3700 riders and 20,000 spectators from 48 countries. 

This house on Hassel Street in Charleston is getting a makeover for the popular PBS program "This Old House."
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

The popular series "This Old House" has been a fixture on PBS  since 1980.  It has filmed in many locations across the country, and now it has come to South Carolina.  The show is shooting the renovation of a classic single-wide home in Charleston for broadcast next March. 

From left to right: Dr. Clayton Copeland, Dr. Robert Dawson and Dr. David Leach.
Olivia Aldridge/SC Public Radio

At the University of South Carolina, three faculty researchers have formed an unexpected research partnership in response to the Thousand-Year-Flood. Soon after the historic October 2015 rain event, a Dr. Clayton Copeland of the School of Library Science approached two of her colleagues from the School of Medicine’s Rehabilitation Counseling Program and proposed a joint study of disabled individuals’ experiences in relation to the flood.

Making History with a Total Solar Eclipse

Aug 21, 2017
Recently identified photo of scientist, academics and dignitaries gathered to witness the May 28, 1900 solar eclipse in Winnsboro, SC.
Photo Courtesy of Fairfield County Museum and Historical Society

Today residents and visitors in South Carolina will witness a total solar eclipse, a rare phenomenon that hasn't been seen in the state since March 7, 1970 and won't occur again in the United States until 2024.

NPR Live Blog -- Total Solar Eclipse Crosses The U.S.

Aug 21, 2017
On Nov. 13, 2012, a narrow corridor in the southern hemisphere experienced a total solar eclipse. The corridor lay mostly over the ocean but also cut across the northern tip of Australia where both professional and amateur astronomers gathered to watch.
Courtesy of Romeo Durscher/NASA

This blog will go live Monday, August 21, at 10 am ET and will run until approximately 3 pm ET. (The eclipse itself is slated to begin in the U.S. around 1:16 pm ET and end about 2:48 pm ET.)

It is indeed dark during the day as a total solar eclipse makes its way from Oregon to South Carolina. Eleven states are in the path of total darkness. Follow the astronomical phenomenon's journey across America along with NPR journalists and others experiencing the eclipse.

The Magic And Mythology Of The Solar Eclipse

Aug 18, 2017

Eclipse mania sweeps the nation. We’ll dig into the science, the history, the culture, and the folklore of the astronomical phenomenon.

SCETV

Preview the great eclipse of August 21st, 2017, interactively! Pick your location on the Earth, scroll through time, and see if your view will be a partial eclipse (in the penumbra) or a total eclipse (in the umbra).

With only days left before the total solar eclipse, the demand for solar filter glasses is high. In the Midlands, Richland Library has acquired additional glasses and will begin to distribute them Friday, August 18 at 9 AM. Community and media relations coordinator Emily Stoll says unlike the library’s first round of glasses distribution, there will be some limitations to what they can provide.

Stoll said the library was able to make a special order for the glasses through the Columbia Visitors Bureau and confirms the glasses are certified and safe to use.

May 20, 2012, eclipse viewing at Arches National Park, Utah.
NPS/Neal Herbert

People across the nation are anxiously awaiting the total solar eclipse August 21st. South Carolinians are among them, as the Palmetto State will be one of the best places in the United States to view the event.  The 65-mile wide path of totality, or area of total eclipse, will pass through Greenville, Columbia and parts of Charleston.  Lawn chairs and sun block will help people to enjoy this once-in-a-lifetime event.  But two Midlands ophthalmologists remind us that the most essential  element to viewing the eclipse is proper eye protection.  The sun’s rays can burn the retinas of unprotected eyes and produce legal blindness.  Today we get good tips on safely watching the eclipse.

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