sc news

State House Week
SC Public Radio

This year's session of the General Assembly has adjourned, but lawmakers will return to Columbia for unfinished business.

file photo of water pouring into a drinking glass
StockSnap via Pixabay

May 6-12 is national Drinking Water Week, a time to appreciate the high quality water found throughout most of the Palmetto State.  Jennifer Satterthwaite, communications coordinator for the Columbia Water Works, says while the city has two excellent sources of water, Lake Murray and the Columbia Canal, many people don’t realize that what they use on land, such as use certain fertilizers, automobile oil or pet waste, can find its way via stormwater runoff  into the water supply.  Fortunately, Water Works Superintendent Clint Shealy says the city does more than it’s required to to keep its

SC Lede: Finals Week 2018

May 8, 2018
Gavin Jackson (c) speaks with Russ McKinney (l) and Jamie Lovegrove in the South Carolina Public Radio studios on Monday, May 7, 2018.
A.T. Shire/SC Public Radio

This week is the final week of the 2018 South Carolina legislative session.

On this edition of South Carolina Lede, host Gavin Jackson is joined by Post and Courier Statehouse Reporter Jamie Lovegrove and South Carolina Public Radio Reporter Russ McKinney to break down what the last three days of the session may hold, including the dozens of bills state lawmakers still have on their calendars.

Education majors at the College of Charleston gather to talk about ways to improve student safety at schools
Victoria Hansen/SC Public Radio

Professor Anne Gutshall teaches psychology courses to future educators at the College of Charleston.  Her students have a lot on their minds.   From teacher walkouts nationwide over low pay to deadly mass shootings at schools, it’s a wonder they want to teach at all.  But they do.  They really do.

For conductor Suzanna Pavlovsky, keeping younger audiences engaged in the world of classical music doesn’t require a complete overhaul so much as a repackaging.

“We don’t need to change the repertoire. We don’t need to change the music itself,” Suzanna says. “But we need to come up with some sort of idea to keep the younger generations more active.”

A replica of the Vietnam Memorial Wall is on display at Historic Camden
Thelisha Eaddy/SC Public Radio

A scaled replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial is on display at Historic Camden. Its called the Wall That Heals and features all the names of the 58,318 who served and died in Vietnam. South Carolina Public Radio spoke with students, teachers, veterans and community members during a recent visit to the exhibit.

State House Week
SC Public Radio

The SC General Assembly heads towards its' final week of the 2018 session. Key bills have yet to pass, but Democrats in the State Senate managed to kill a sweeping anti-abortion bill.

Industrial robots on an automobile assembly line.
ISAPUT [CC BY-SA 4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Automation has been increasing in the Palmetto State’s factories for a long time, bringing with it fears of job losses for people whose jobs are vulnerable to being replaced by machines.  But Roger Varin of Staubli Robotics, which makes robots for industry, says jobs are changing, but not necessarily vanishing.  In fact, he asserts, automation creates jobs in some areas. 

SC Lede: Six More Days

May 1, 2018
Gavin Jackson (r) speaks with Russ McKinney (l) and Andy Shain in the South Carolina Public Radio studios on Monday, April 30, 2018.
A.T. Shire/SC Public Radio

There are six working days left in the 2018 South Carolina state legislative session, and the stage has been set to make these final two weeks a bit chaotic, with debates over budget spending, SCE&G rate reductions, and more.

On this edition of South Carolina Lede, host Gavin Jackson looks at the biggest stories coming out of the statehouse with Andy Shain, Columbia bureau chief for The Post and Courier, and South Carolina Public Radio Reporter Russ McKinney.

Richland County celebrates the first new mobile home given to a 2015 flood survivor.
Thelisha Eaddy/SC Public Radio

For the past two years, South Carolina has been in recovery mode. Long-term recovery for families, business and municipalities, following the historic rain event and flood of October 2015, is seen in almost every county. Recently, during National Community Development Week, Richland County celebrated the first home in its flood recovery program given to a flood survivor. The event marked a major milestone in the County’s recovery program and also presented a second chance at recovery for those still living in unsafe and conditions.

The 2018 National Health Security Preparedness Index was released in April. A program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the index gauges each state's response to emergent situations affecting public health.
nhspi.org

It’s that time again. Spring is in full swing, and so are preparations for the upcoming Atlantic hurricane season. The National Weather Service is preparing to recognize National Hurricane Preparedness Week in early May, and will partner with the state’s Emergency Management Division to sponsor South Carolina Hurricane Preparedness week beginning May 27.

Healthcare Power of Attorney illustration
James D. Sims [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

May is National Elder Law Month, a time lawyers endeavor to spread the word that their specialty provides legal advocacy, guidance, and services to enhance the lives of seniors and people with disabilities. Columbia elder law attorney Lauren Wasson says there are three basic financial documents that should be in place for every senior citizen: a will, a durable power of attorney and a health care power of attorney, which assigns a trusted person to speak for the elderly client if he/she is unable to speak for him/herself.

Lowcountry Mayors Unite in Fight Against Sea Level Rise

Apr 27, 2018
Beaufort Waterfront
Victoria Hansen/SC Public Radio

Both have historic homes, waterfront parks and battery walls,  as well as  reputations for hospitality.  Charleston was named the  best southern city this year by Southern Living Magazine.  Last year, Beaufort was awarded best small town.  But that’s not all these two Lowcountry communities have in common.

“We’re sort of like brothers,” said Beaufort Mayor Keyserling.  He’s referring to his life-long, family friendship with Charleston Mayor John Tecklenburg.  Their cities may be 70 miles apart, but the two catch up by phone at least once or twice a week.

FCC Commissioner Mignon Clyburn
Federal Communications Commission

For the past nine years, South Carolina native Mignon Clyburn has served as commissioner with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). She was sworn into office, on August 3, 2009 at the Matthew J. Perry, Jr. Courthouse in Columbia and since then has become a strong supporter of net neutrality, media ownership reform and lowering prison phone rates. This month, Clyburn announced she was leaving the agency.

State House Week
SC Public Radio

The State House and Senate remain at odds over reducing SCE&G's nuclear charge, and the state will soon have a new Child Advocate.

Sexaual assault awareness and prevention efforts extend into the military. This T-shirt was on display during a Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month event at Kandahar Airfield in Kandahar province, Afghanistan, April 1, 2013.
U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Ashley Bell

The instance of sexual assault in the United States is growing at a rate that would surprise, even alarm, many people.  According to Shannon Nix, associate director of sexual assault and violence intervention and prevention at the University of South Carolina, one in four women - and one in six men – will be sexually assaulted at some point in their lives.   This high number doesn’t mean more assaults are happening, however.  Nix said it seems that way because more people are reporting it. 

The new Four Paws Animal Clinic recently opened a few blocks from its former location after more than two years of operations in a temporary building while it recovered from the 2015 flood and sought the right place for its new home.
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

For some, the so-called “thousand-year rain” and the floods that followed it in October 2015 may seem an event long past, but many are still recovering from the storm’s devastation.  For some businesses in Richland County, the after effects of the floods continue to pose particular difficulties. Take the Four Paws Animal Clinic, which was forced to operate out of a temporary location for more than two years after the flood, when the business' original building bordering Gills Creek was ruined.

Beth Drake, United States Attorney, with officials from SLED, SC Departent of Corrections, and the FBI.
Laura Hunsberger

The United States Attorney's Office announced the arrest of fourteen employees of South Carolina correctional facilities who are now facing Federal charges to bribery and bringing contraband in the state’s prisons. U.S. Attorney for the District of South Carolina, Beth Drake, says the charges resulted from an investigation that has been ongoing for years.

Popular State Park Reopens after Hurricane Damage

Apr 25, 2018
Hunting Island State Park Campground area.
Victoria Hansen/SC Public Radio

There’s a stop sign for campers pulling into Hunting Island State Park.  But visitors have likely slowed down long before.  The island has been closed for nearly two years following Hurricanes Matthew and Irma.  To the right of the entrance, campers once enjoyed breath taking beachside views.  Now storm damage takes their breath away.

The Williamsburg Regional Hospital's building in Kingstree was irreparably damaged during the 2015 floods.
Laura Hunsberger

For more than a year, the Williamsburg Regional Hospital has been serving patients from a temporary facility located right next to their old building. The hospital was damaged beyond repair during the thousand-year floods. Eventually, the hospital determined that they had to move out of the old building.

Gavin Jackson (l) speaks with Jamie Lovegrove and Meg Kinnard (r) in the South Carolina Public Radio studios on Monday, April 23, 2018.
A.T. Shire/SC Public Radio

Last week saw two South Carolina news stories make local and national headlines.

First, a riot at the Lee Correction Institution maximum-security prison in central South Carolina left seven inmates dead and several others injured. The alleged gang fight was over territory and contraband, and was the deadliest prison riot in 25 years.

The stage at the eighth annual River Rocks Music Festival. Damages caused by the floods of 2015 forced the festival to relocate from its usual location at Riverfront Park.
Laura Hunsberger/SC Public Radio

On a sunny patch of open space along the Congaree River in Columbia, the eighth annual River Rocks Festival brought hundreds of residents out last weekend to enjoy the spring weather and learn about the conservation efforts of the region’s Congaree Riverkeeper and their partners. In between acts, a man took the stage to pump up the crowd.

State House Week
SC Public Radio

The S.C. General Assembly has moved to cut SCE&G's nuclear rate, and prison violence sparks calls for action.

North Inlet - Winyah Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve. Aerial view of meandering tidal creeks and extensive pristine marshes in North Inlet Estuary. Vicinity of Georgetown, South Carolina.
NOAA Photo Library/Flickr

Earth Day is held each April to remind people of the importance of caring for our world, according to USC Environmental Health Sciences Professor Joe Jones.  He practices what he preaches, as he regularly takes his students outdoors to pick up trash that has washed into a campus creek from Columbia’s Five Points area, where many students eat and drink.  He tells them that if trash could wash from one part of town to another, it could also get into the Congaree River and thus to the coast, and, ultimately, wash up on the shores of other countries. 

Coral polyps on Molasses Reef, Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary.
Brent Deuel [CC BY 2.0] via Flickr

People picture coral reefs as bursting with color and teeming with a variety of undersea life, which many are. But their number is shrinking, says College of Charleston biologist Phil Dustan, because they are hyper-sensitive to temperature changes, and climate change is warming the ocean to intolerable levels for many reefs. In his 40-plus years of studying reefs, Dustan said, the Florida Keys, for example, have probably lost 90 to 95 percent of their living coral reefs.

Volvo Car Open on Daniel Island.
Victoria Hansen/SC Public Radio

You know it’s spring in Charleston when the cars are thick with yellow pollen, as well as  a colorful array of out of state license plates.  Porta- Potties line the streets, novice runners sport bright, new shoes and college kids seeking sun and warmth stretch out behind the beach dunes.  Typically, the signs appear in April, alongside two annual events; the Cooper River Bridge Run and the Volvo Car Open.

SC Lede: Gubernatorial Arms Race

Apr 17, 2018
Gavin Jackson and Jamie Lovegrove
A.T. Shire/SC Public Radio

We're less than two months away from the June 12 South Carolina primary. On this edition of South Carolina Lede, host Gavin Jackson speaks with Post and Courier Statehouse Reporter Jamie Lovegrove about the latest on the race for the governor's office.

A.T. Shire, SC Public Radio

When the celebrated maker of string instruments Antonio Stradivari put the finishing touches on the violin now known as the Ex-Nachez, Bach and Handel were barely into their toddler years and the invention of the piano was still more than a decade away. 

The rare violin has passed through the hands of many an owner and virtuoso performer since that time, but, as Yuriy Bekker of the Charleston Symphony Orchestra can attest, the instrument is still in excellent playing condition.

State House Week
SC Public Radio

The SC Senate approves next year's $8 Billion state budget, and a major setback for proponents of solar energy in the state.

At State Education Department in Columbia, Superintendent Molly Spearman announces state of emergency in Williamsburg County School District.
Thelisha Eaddy/SC Public Radio

State Superintendent of Education Molly Spearman declared a state of emergency in the Williamsburg County School District and will now take over day-to-day operations. During a press conference in Columbia, Spearman cited financial mismanagement, systemic programmatic issues, and poor student academic performance for her decision.

Pages