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A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

Walter Pater was an influential 19th-century English author and critic, and in 1870 he wrote a fascinating essay about the Italian Renaissance painter Sandro Botticelli. In one passage that particularly caught my eye, Pater wrote, “If [Botticelli] painted religious incidents, [he] painted them with an undercurrent of original sentiment, which touches you as the real matter of the picture through the veil of its ostensible subject.” 


The distinctive white shawl protest graffiti of the Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo makes its mark in Bariloche's central square.
McKay Savage [CC BY 2.0] via Flickr

The Buenos Aires Herald ceased publication in July of 2017, almost 141 years after its founding. The paper became famous, however, only in the latter part of the 20th century, for exposing the forced disappearances of Argentinians during the 1976-83 military dictatorship. Other newspapers in the country whitewashed this chapter of Argentina’s history.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

“A" is for Ashwood Plantation. Located in Lee County,  the Ashwood Plantation Project was established as a resettlement site for tenant farmers displaced during the Great Depression. In 1934, the Federal Emergency Relief Administration [FERA] acquired 7,000 acres south of Bishopville, including the 2,200-acre Ashwood Plantation of former governor Richard I. Manning. Other parcels ultimately raised the total to 11,000 acres. Project directors planned to settle about 200 families at Ashwood.

The Buenos Aires Herald ceased publication in July of 2017, almost 141 years after its founding. The paper became famous, however, only in the latter part of the 20th century, for exposing the forced disappearances of Argentinians during the 1976-83 military dictatorship. Other newspapers in the country whitewashed this chapter of Argentina’s history.

This week Bobbi Conner talks with Dr. William Basco about keeping children and teen safe from opioids in the home.  Dr. Basco is a Professor of Pediatrics and Director of the Division of General Pediatrics at MUSC Children’s Health.

Future drill sergeants practice their techniques on their fellow trainees at Fort Jackson. (File)
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

A new study finds South Carolina among ten states with a larger number of unfit Army recruits compared to the rest of the nation. The research comes from the Citadel, a military school in Charleston, and shows potential soldiers who are not physically fit are more likely to be injured during basic training, costing the Department of Defense and putting our nation's military readiness at risk.

Interpretation

Jan 12, 2018
A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

Composers write pieces, and performers perform them. But for the performers, just about everything the composer writes, with the exception of the notes themselves, is a matter of interpretation. The composer indicates that a passage should be played softly? Fine. But how softly? It should get louder? Okay, but how much louder? Faster, slower? – same thing, it’s a matter of interpretation and personal taste. 


South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"E" is for Edwards, William Augustus [1866-1939]. Architect. Edwards began his career in Virginia, but, moved back to South Carolina as a partner in the firm of Wilson and Edwards. Edwards was the lead partner in several other architectural firms in South Carolina and, after 1908, in Atlanta.

Tammy Mainwarring
Mike Switzer/SC Public Radio

After a recent study commissioned by our next guest’s organization uncovered some serious skills gaps in our state’s information technology workforce, they decided to help employers address them with a series of upcoming workshops.

Mike Switzer interviews Tammy Mainwaring, president of IT-ology in Columbia, SC.

Spotted at the Feeder

Jan 12, 2018
NatureNotes
SC Public Radio

Rudy reports on the sightings at his backyard bird feeder.

State House Week
SC Public Radio

State lawmakers returned to Columbia this week for the 2018 session of the S.C. General Assembly. Fallout from last summer's collapse of the V.C. Nuclear is expected to dominate this year's session.  Also, this week the House of Representatives wasted little time in overriding Gov. Henry McMaster's veto of some $20 million dollars for new school buses.

Narrative: A Songwriter's Musical Upbringing

Jan 11, 2018
Musician and songwriter Jack "Jackie" Jeffords and his son Jason Jeffords, Columbia 2016
StoryCorps

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, an oral history project where friends and loved ones interview each other. At the StoryCorps mobile booth in Columbia in 2016, Jason Jeffords talked with his father Jackie Jeffords about his life as a musician and songwriter. Here, Jackie describes his musical childhood in a family with eight brothers and sisters.

Epworth Children's Home in Columbia will soon make available to the public a treat that its residents and visitors have enjoyed for decades: peanut butter ice cream, which has been produced at the home since the Great Depression.
Photo courtesy Riggs Partners, West Columbia, S.C.

For decades, Epworth Children's Home in Columbia has been well known in Methodist circles for two things: caring for children, and the unique dessert it has produced since the Great Depression: peanut butter ice cream.  The government sent the home large quantities of peanut butter to help give the children protein, and the cooks served it in every way they could think of, said Epworth President John Holler.   In those days, the home had a dairy, so someone suggested  trying to make ice cream with it. 

A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

The body length of a full-size violin is about 14 inches, give or take a very small fraction. This is a standard length, and an optimum length, arrived at by trial and error over many years by the great violin makers of history. Violas, on the other hand, have no standard length. For the pitch range and acoustics of the viola there probably is an optimum length, but whatever it is, it’s way too great for the instrument still to be held up and played under the chin. 


South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"D" is for DeKalb, Johann [1712-1780]. Soldier. Born in Bavaria, DeKalb rose to the rank of brigadier-general in the French Army and decided to seek his military fortune in America. He was contracted as a major-general in the Continental Army and, along with Lafayette, arrived off the coast South Carolina, near Georgetown, in 1777.

As you are probably starting to find out, the new tax law is affecting a lot of things.  Possibly, even affordable housing.  In fiscal year 2017, South Carolina’s Housing Tax Credit program allocated over $12 million across 20 new housing developments.  But while the tax credits are still there, our next guest says that the new lower corporate tax rate may make them less attractive.

A Leaf-Footed Bug
Lyle Buss, Department of Entomology and Nematology, University of Florida

Leaf-footed bugs often over-winter as adults in South Carolina.

Looking at Conductors

Jan 10, 2018
A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

The other day, a friend asked me if orchestral musicians really look at the conductor when they’re playing. It’s an interesting question, because after all, how can you look at your music and play all the right notes if you’re also looking up at the person waving the baton? The answer is that you do both, but not always in the same proportion and not always at the same time. There are times—the beginnings of pieces, for example, or at other times when the music starts or stops, or when the tempo changes, when you have to look directly at the conductor. 


South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"C" is for Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge. Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1932 as a wintering ground for migratory waterfowl. Located in Charleston County Cape Romain stretches 22 miles along the coast between Charleston and the Santee River delta. In its shallow bays, tides combine the life-giving nourishment of the oceans with the nutrient-laden freshwaters of rivers to create a rich, productive environment.

In today’s multi-lingual world of commerce, many businesses are committing to translating their website and documents into the home languages of their customers and prospects.  But our next guest says that there is a lot more to translating than most companies realize.

Mike Switzer interviews Yuri Ivanov, CEO and owner of Ivannovation in Taylors, SC.

Mantis Fly

Jan 10, 2018
A Mantis Fly.
Pavel Kirillov [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

The front legs of the Mantis Fly resemble those of a Mantis.

Host Gavin Jackson discusses the upcoming 2018 South Carolina Legislative Session with The Post and Courier's Columbia Bureau Chief, Andy Shain.

Topics include the VC Summer nuclear situation, ethics reform, and more!


A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

I’m guessing you haven’t thought much about this, but one of the things we musicians have to put up with is calluses. Not feeling sympathetic? But what if the calluses are peeling, or bleeding, or have bruises under or around them, or make you look like you’ve been attacked by a vampire? You can probably guess that string players have calluses on the tips of the fingers of their left hands, and you’ve seen the indelible marks on the necks of violinists and violists. 


South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"B" is for Brewton, Miles [ca. 1765-1769]. A native Charlestonian, Brewton’s powerful family was allied to banking, enabling him to establish a career in finance and trade. Twice during the 1750s, he traveled to England to finish his education and establish commercial ties. Between 1756 and his death, Brewton conducted business in several partnerships and was part-owner in eight commercial vessels. His partnerships dealt largely with the exportation of domestic produce, but he also made substantial profits in the slave trade.

Joy Watkins
Mike Switzer/SC Public Radio

As our population continues to age, more and more people are entering the Social Security system.  But our next guest says that the big question for most people is: when is the best time to actually do so?  At age 62, 65, or later?

Mike Switzer interviews Joy Watkins, a certified financial planner with Anchor Investment Management in Columbia, SC.

A Western Visitor

Jan 9, 2018
A Rufous-Tailed Hummingbird.
Alfred Viola, Northeastern University, Bugwood.org

Western hummingbirds have been increasingly sited in the eastern U.S.

Close-up of gas nozzle refueling car.
Andreas [CC0 1.0] via Pixabay

A new gasoline tax credit that takes effect this year will give  South Carolina drivers a little relief from the cost of driving.  The tax credit can be filed for beginning in January 2019 for the 2018 tax year.  This credit is to help offset the annual 2-cent-per- gallon increase in the gasoline tax to be dedicated to road upkeep for the next five years (for a total of six years, or an eventual 12-cents per gallon).  SC Dept.

Pneumonia

Jan 9, 2018

This week Bobbi Conner talks with Dr. Lynn Schnapp about signs, symptoms and treatment of pneumonia.  Dr. Schnapp is a Professor and Director of the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, Allergy and Sleep Medicine at MUSC.

What a Week! Brrrr...

Jan 8, 2018
Surfboard Sledding in the Old Village of Mount Pleasant, SC.
Victoria Hansen/SC Public Radio

A winter storm brought rare snow and ice to South Carolina's Lowcountry last week. With a thaw finally in the weather forecast for the coast, and winter weather advisories in the Upstate, it's a good time to look back on the unusual--and beautiful--sights in the greater Charleston area, as captured last week by South Carolina Public Radio's Victoria Hansen.

A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

In music, the terms “high” and “low,” as in “high notes” and “low notes,” “high pitched” and “low pitched,” are metaphors. High and low may be used to describe frequencies, or the relative position of printed notes on a musical staff, but printed notes are themselves merely symbols, not sounds, and frequencies and their measurements don’t actually have height. In reality, high notes are not physically higher, not farther from the surface of the earth, than low notes. 


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