SCETV App

This week Bobbi Conner talks with Dr. Dean Kilpatrick about the new Mass Violence and Victimization Resource Center, which is being created to provide services and resources for people affected by mass violence. Dr. Kilpatrick is the Director of the National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center at MUSC. 

Cover photo of a bird-filled sky above a line of trees at sunset.
Kathleen Robbins

Ed Madden, editor of Theologies of Terrain (Muddy Ford Press, 2017), writes that poet Tim Conroy “is a theologian of the best kind, a theologian of the ordinary.”

“He knows… [we] face crushing loss and daily difficulties. We have to learn to live the best we can here, now. … [Conroy] points us to a ‘cathedral’ of trees where we are encouraged to find not truth or healing but perspective—to measure ourselves ‘by how a towering / moment passes.’"

Tim Conroy and Ed Madden join Walter Edgar to talk about Conroy’s Theologies of Terrain.

Tenors

Jan 5, 2018
A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

The word “tenor” is from the Latin tenere, “to hold”…and in medieval and Renaissance vocal music, from about 1250 to 1500, the tenor voice was the “holding voice.” It was the voice that held the principal melody, often with long held-out notes, and the voice around which the other voices were composed. The tenor voice, always a male voice, was not necessarily a high voice—or at least not originally.


NatureScene

Jan 5, 2018
NatureNotes
SC Public Radio

A listener from Vermont salutes the work of Rudy Mancke and Jim Welch over the years on SCETV's NatureScene.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"A" is for Atwater, Harvey LeRoy [1951-1991]. Political Adviser. Born in Atlanta, Atwater was reared in Columbia. A graduate of Newberry College, he received an MA in mass communications from USC. He spent much of his early career managing campaigns for prominent South Carolinians Carroll Campbell, Floyd Spence, and Strom Thurmond. In these elections he gained a reputation as a shrewd, yet negative campaigner, willing to use almost any tactic to help his candidate.

After a recent merger, our next guest now runs the third largest Coldwell Banker real estate office in the nation.  Who better to talk to, to get the pulse of the home-buying business as a new year gets underway?

Mike Switzer interviews Don Smith, CEO of Coldwell Banker Chicora Advantage in Myrtle Beach, SC.

The Holy City Hails Near Record Snowstorm

Jan 4, 2018
Surfboard Sledding in the Old Village of Mount Pleasant, SC.
Victoria Hansen/SC Public Radio

Parents packed up golf carts like snow mobiles as kids grabbed their sea worthy boogie boards and headed out in search of higher ground.  Hills are hard to come by in the Lowcountry.  But then again, so is snow.  Charleston got a rare thrill Wednesday.  More than five inches of snow swirled through palm fronds and gathered on the ground.  It's the most snow the area has seen since Hurricane Hugo and it would be enjoyed.

A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

Under the heading “Real Musical Understanding,” here’s something that Sergei Rachmaninoff wrote in 1910:

“…Some teachers lay a great deal of stress upon the necessity for the pupil learning the source of the composer’s inspiration. This is interesting, of course, and may help to stimulate a dull imagination..."


Ant Lion Pits

Jan 4, 2018
Ant lion larva (Myrmeleontidae).
NPS/Robb Hannawacker

The indentations around the nest of an Ant Lion larva are for trapping prey.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"E" is for Enterprise Railroad. Chartered in 1870, with a capital of $250,000, this railroad is unique in South Carolina history: with one exception its initial board of directors were all African Americans. Constructed in 1874, the railroad used horse-drawn carriages to passengers and freight, connecting wharves and railroad depots throughout the city of Charleston. The railroad created tension within Charleston’s black community as 75% of the city’s draymen were African American. They feared the company would diminish their business.

The South is not known for being a haven for public transportation users.  But our next guest’s Lowcountry bus service is succeeding with their customers by staying on the cutting edge of transit technology.

Mike Switzer interviews Mike Seekings, chair of the Charleston Area Regional Transportation Authority known as CARTA.

Driving Safely in Snow and on Icy Roads

Jan 3, 2018

Not used to driving in snow or on icy roads? The South Carolina Department of Public Safety suggests some things to keep in mind:

Speed - Slow down for wet, snowy, or icy conditions. You will be more likely to maintain control of your vehicle at lower speeds. Slow down when approaching intersections, off-ramps, bridges or shady spots. These are all potential problem spots for black ice, which is a thin coating of clear ice that can form on the pavement surface that may be difficult to see especially at night.

A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

The French playwright Molière once said, “Anyone can be an honorable man, and yet write verse badly.” Well, no one would dispute that there are many honorable men and women who write music. But if there are such things as “good pieces” or “great pieces,” then there must also be such things as bad pieces. There must be pieces that don’t work very well or don’t work at all, pieces that don’t offer much even to the most open-minded and honorable of music lovers.


Deer in the Lake

Jan 3, 2018
NatureNotes
SC Public Radio

A listener sees a group of deer dashing into Lake Murray. Unusual?

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"C" is for Chalmers, Lionel [1715-1777]. Physician. Scientist. A native of Scotland, Chalmers was in Charleston in 1737 where he established a modest practice. In 1740 he entered into partnership with Dr. John Lining. Lining had been recording weather data for years. Between 1750 and 1759 Chalmers compiled his own series of meteorological records. Later he combined Lining’s records with his in his best known work, An Account of the Weather and Diseases in South Carolina—published in London in 1776.

In today’s very competitive world of economic development, small and rural towns and counties often find themselves behind the eight-ball, unable to match the incentives offered by their larger counterparts to attract business investment.  But our next guest says a little imagination and creativity may be the answer.

Mike Switzer interviews C.D. Rhodes, an attorney with Pope Flynn in Columbia, SC.

File: An information packet from last year's Economic Outlook Conference at USC.
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

Like the stock market, which has reached all-time highs in recent weeks, consumer confidence is high.   And that same optimism is fueling the economic outlook for South Carolina for 2018.  Economists Joey Von Nessen and Doug Woodward participated in a recent conference in Columbia, in which they predicted slow but steady growth of the economy in the coming year, at a rate of 2.1 percent.  Personal income should be rise to 4.3%, up from 3.8%, said Von Nessen.  The experts said large companies have brought many jobs to the state, turning around the general wisdom that small business historica

A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

Today is the second of January, and on this date in 1881, the Spanish violinist Pablo de Sarasate was in Paris to play the premiere of the Violin Concerto No. 3 by Camille Saint-Saëns.


NatureNotes
SC Public Radio

Rudy shares words from Henri-Frédéric Amiel's journal:

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"B" is for Bennett, Thomas, Jr. [1781-1865]. Governor. With his father, Bennett built a lucrative lumber and rice mill business in Charleston. He was active in the Chamber of Commerce and served as a director of the Bank of the State of South Carolina, and the Louisville, Cincinnati, and Charleston Railroad. He was mayor of Charleston and served six terms in the South Carolina House of Representatives—and was its Speaker. He was elected to the State Senate in 1819, but resigned a year later when he was elected Governor.

This week Bobbi Conner talks with Dr. Patrick O’Neil about healthy weight management and tips to lose excess weight.  Dr. O’Neil is a Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Director of the Weight Management Center at MUSC.

John Warner
Concepts to Companies

A weekly update of the entrepreneurial activity in South Carolina.

Mike Switzer interviews John Warner is co-founder of Concepts to Companies and founder and CEO of Swampfox, an entrepreneur-centric social media company, based in Greenville, S.C.

Pieces not Parts

Jan 1, 2018
A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

It’s hard to write a good piece of music, a piece whose elements fit together in ways that make sense, a piece that has a beginning, a middle, and an end and that leaves the listener feeling that the time spent listening has been worthwhile. And I don’t know about you, but when I read a review saying that a piece is constructed entirely of “shimmering hazes of sound,” or “a parade of fascinating effects,” or “random rhythmic bursts and captivating colors,” I’m usually pretty sure that it’s a piece I’m not terribly interested in hearing.

French-Canadian pianist and composer Lorraine Desmarais made her first appearance in the United States at the 1986 Great American Jazz Competition, where she took the highest honors. In 2012 she was awarded the prestigious Order of Canada for her work bringing Canadian jazz to the world. She was McPartland’s guest for this 1991 Piano Jazz. She performs a few of her own compositions, “The Third King” and “Memoir,” along with a set of standards.

News & Talk Stations: Sat, Jan 06, 8 pm | News & Music Stations: Sun, Jan 07, 7 pm

Dr. Lorien Foote
[CC BY-NC-ND 2.0] / University of Central Arkansas

(Originally broadcast 09/15/17) - During the winter of 1864, more than 3,000 Federal prisoners of war escaped from Confederate prison camps into South Carolina and North Carolina, often with the aid of local slaves. Their flight created, in the words of contemporary observers, a "Yankee plague," heralding a grim end to the Confederate cause. In The Yankee Plague: Escaped Union Prisoners and the Collapse of the Confederacy (2016, UNC Press) Dr.

Happy New Year!

Jan 1, 2018
NatureNotes
SC Public Radio

Start the year with a nature walk!

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"A" is for Asian religions. In 1965, the US Congress passed laws liberalizing existing statutes regarding the entry of Asian immigrants. This had a significant effect on the religious landscape of South Carolina. By the 1980s the state had become home to emergent communities of Asian immigrants—East Indians, Cambodians, Vietnamese, and Laotians from Southeast Asia.  Prior to the 1960s the most notable Hindu presence in the state was the Meher Baba Spiritual Center in Myrtle Beach.

This week Bobbi Conner talks with Dr. Christine Holmstedt about the signs and symptoms of stroke and why prompt treatment is essential. Dr. Holmstedt is an Associate Professor of Neurology and Emergency Medicine and the Medical Director of the Tele-Neuroscience at MUSC. 

Our program today features an excerpt from the University of South Carolina Moore School's recent Economic Outlook Conference.

Today's excerpt comes from from Cheryl Stanton, executive director of the South Carolina Department of Employment and Workforce in Columbia, SC.

This is the way the new Real I.D.s will look when they are available to South Carolinians between the end of the first quarter of 2018 and Oct. 1, 2020.  The gold star in the upper right corner denotes the card as a Real I.D.
Photo courtesy S.C. Dept. of Motor Vehicles

The Real I.D. Act of 2005 was passed by Congress in the wake of the Sept. 11 attacks to standardize government-issued identifications, like drivers' licenses, for security purposes.  Beginning in 2018, South Carolinians will be able to get a Real I.D., which they must have by Oct. 1, 2020, in order to do activities such as board a commercial airplane, visit a secure federal building or a military post. 

Pages