SCETV App

Casals' Birthday

Dec 29, 2017
A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

Today we celebrate the birthday of Pablo Casals. Casals, called Pau Casals in his native Catalan language, was born on December 29, 1876, and he lived for almost a century, dying in 1973.


"W" is for Wright, Mary Honor Farrow [1862-1946]. Educator. Born into slavery in Spartanburg County, Wright received her early education from northern teachers who came to South Carolina after the Civil War. In 1879, after graduating from Claflin University, she accepted her first teaching position in Inman, where she held classes in a brush arbor. She later organized schools and taught in mill villages and churches in Spartanburg and Saxon. In 1904 she organized a school in her home for black children who were to young to walk to the nearest black school.

Cold Weather Safety

Dec 29, 2017

Winter weather can turn hazardous quickly, but if you’re prepared, you can handle anything Mother Nature throws at you!  If you don’t already have an emergency kit, think about pulling together a few emergency items like batteries, candles, a first aid kit, et cetera.

Southern Flying Squirrel
Ken Thomas via Wikimedia Commons

Listeners rescue a small squirrel that usually sleeps during the day.

Cooper's Hawk

Dec 28, 2017
A Cooper's Hawk
TexasEagle [CC BY-NC 2.0] via Flickr

This splendid bird of prey can be identified by its long tail and relatively short wings.

Time and Meaning

Dec 28, 2017
A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

In music, time passes. But it mustn’t be without purpose or reasons: without . . . meaning. And that’s the point: Music can give meaning to time. If all the interwoven elements in a piece of music mean something—if they remind, reflect, comfort, inspire, or excite—then by definition the time it takes for them to do all that will mean something too.

Our program today features an excerpt from the University of South Carolina Moore School's recent Economic Outlook Conference.

Today's excerpt comes from Joan Robinson-Berry, vice president and general manager for Boeing South Carolina in North Charleston, SC.

"M" is for Magrath, Andrew Gordon [1813-1893]. Jurist, governor. After graduating from the South Carolina College, Magrath studied law at Harvard and with James L. Petigru. In 1856 his appointment as a federal district judge brought him national attention and controversy. In the cases surrounding two ships seized for being slave traders—the Echo and the Wanderer—Magrath declared that the federal statues on piracy did not apply to the slave trade. His decision was hailed in the South and condemned in the North.

We’ve talked about common cold weather myths, and one of the most common misconceptions about this time of year is that you don’t need sunscreen.  In fact, snow and ice can reflect up to eighty percent of harmful UV rays, so lather up with sunscreen even in the winter.

Dvorak on Spirituals

Dec 27, 2017
A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

The composer Ernest Bloch once wrote that it’s only by plunging one’s roots to the depths of one’s own people that one finds the common ground of all people. Antonin Dvorák expressed a similar sentiment, and here’s the advice that he gave to American composers at the beginning of the 20th century, after he had been introduced to African American Sprirtuals:

“I am now satisfied that the future music of this country must be founded upon what are called the negro melodies...

Cola Ukulele Band rehearses for an upcoming performance.
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

Over the past decade or so, the ukulele has grown tremendously in popularity among a wide variety of people, helped by its use by popular artists such as Jason Mraz and Ingrid Michaelson.  The trend hit the Midlands recently when University of South Carolina music student Tim Hall got a grant to start the Cola (not Columbia, though that’s where it’s located) Ukulele Band.  Since its beginning, the band has attracted members of all ages, from elementary school children to grandparents. 

Our program today features an excerpt from the University of South Carolina Moore School's recent Economic Outlook Conference.

Today's excerpt comes from Joan Robinson-Berry, vice president and general manager for Boeing South Carolina in North Charleston, SC.

"K" is for Kershaw, Joseph Brevard [1822-1894]. Soldier, Jurist. Kershaw, a native of Camden, was a member of the General Assembly and of the Secession Convention. In April 1861 he was a colonel of the Second South Carolina Regiment which played an active role in the Confederate victory at First Manassas. The next year he was promoted to brigadier general and given command of the brigade that saw action at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg.

Winter is here and with it comes some outdated information about the cold temperatures, but don’t let winter health myths get the best of you!  For starters, cold air does not make you sick.

Mediterranean Gecko

Dec 27, 2017
A Mediterranean Gecko.
Nathan Vaughn/Flickr

A listener spots a lizard near Charleston harbor...

Bearded Hedgehog Fungus
Lebrac, via Wikimedia Commons

Some naturalists find a massive fungus, sometimes known as a Lion's Mane fungus.

Narrative: "Together We Grew"

Dec 26, 2017
Marcia Peter and facilitator Felix Lopez, Columbia 2016
StoryCorps

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, an oral history project based on the idea that the stories of everyday people are the most important and interesting of all. When StoryCorps visited Columbia in 2016, Marcia Peters talked with facilitator Felix Lopez about her experience raising three children as a single mom.

Soothing Music

Dec 26, 2017
A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

When “classical” public radio stations surveyed their audiences some years back, the most common answer to the question, “Why do you listen to classical music,” was, “Because it’s soothing.” Now think of Beethoven for a moment, the man whose very name defines “classical music” for many people.  He wrote music that sends the soul soaring, that plumbs the depths of human despair, that shatters silence with violent assaults.  


Our program today features an excerpt from the University of South Carolina Moore School's recent Economic Outlook Conference.

Today's excerpt comes from South Carolina Governor Henry McMaster.

"J" is for Jakes, John

Dec 26, 2017

"J" is for Jakes, John [b. 1932]. Novelist. Born in Illinois, Jakes is a nationally known best-selling novelist and historian. For several decades, he maintained his primary residence on Hilton Head Island. After graduating from DePauw University, he spent a number of years working for pharmaceutical and advertising companies. Then, in 1973 he published the first of eight volumes of the Kent Family Chronicles—a series that depicted the American Revolution through the eyes of one fictional family.

You’ve been enjoying that Christmas tree all month long, and while it’s sad to think about taking it down and packing away your decorations, start planning for how you’ll reuse that live Christmas tree.

This week Bobbi Conner talks with Dr. David Lewin about research related to In-Vivo Microscopy—a new technology that allows physicians and researchers to look at living tissue, at a microscopic level.  Dr. David Lewin, is a Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and Director of Gastrointestinal Pathology at MUSC.

Christmas Carols

Dec 25, 2017
A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

Nobody knows for certain where the word “carol” comes from.  It may come from the Latin, “chorus,” by way of the Greek “khoros,” and both words have to do with dancing in a circle, probably while singing.


Marian McPartland and Dizzy Gillespie.
SC Public Radio

2017 marks the centennial of jazz giant Dizzy Gillespie (1917 – 1993). In a classic Piano Jazz from 1985, Gillespie discusses his work with Duke Ellington and Thelonious Monk, demonstrates various rhythmic progressions, and shares his theory on Aretha Franklin’s unique vocal phrasing. Inspired by the session, McPartland spontaneously creates two new compositions in Gillespie’s honor: "For Dizzy" and "A Portrait of Diz." They perform several of Dizzy’s tunes, including "A Night in Tunisia" and "In a Mellow Tone."

Travel, history, ghosts and more are among the many subjects of the USC Press' books.
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

The Palmetto State has a prestigious name in the world of publishing: the University of South Carolina Press. Because it’s a non-profit, it can publish scholarly books on important subjects that would not make a profit for commercial publishers, according to Suzanne Axland. But that doesn’t mean the press doesn’t publish for the general interest. It prints a wide variety of books on art, history, Southern culture, beautiful photography and more, even novels, says Axland.

Frank Kearns
WVU Press

(Originally broadcast 09/08/17) - Columbian Gerald Davis is co-producer of the 2012 Emmy-winning documentary Frank Kearns: American Correspondent first aired on West Virginia Public Television. Recently, Davis has published Algerian Diary: Frank Kearns and the "Impossible Assignment" for CBS News (2016, WVU Press). He talks with Walter Edgar about his deep dive into Kearns’ life and the assignment that changed the way the U.S. viewed Algeria’s fight for independence from France.

Our program today features an excerpt from the University of South Carolina Moore School's recent Economic Outlook Conference.

Today's excerpt comes from South Carolina Governor Henry McMaster.

"I" is for indigo

Dec 25, 2017

"I" is for indigo. Indigo, a plant that produces a blue dye was an important part of 18th century South Carolina's economy. It was grown commercially from 1747 till 1800 and was second only to rice in export value. Eliza Lucas Pinckney experimented with its cultivation in the 1730s and 1740s. In 1749 Parliament placed a bounty of six pence per pound on the dye. Indigo was grown on lands not suited to rice cultivation and thus fit nicely into the existing agricultural economy. By the eve of the Revolution, the colony exported more than one million pounds of dye.

This time of year is magical- unless you’re allergic to the holidays!  No, I’m not talking about Scrooge, but think about all the allergy irritants this time of year.  First, those decorations have been sitting in the attic for a year collecting dust, and anyone with indoor allergies knows that dust can be a real headache.

NatureNotes
SC Public Radio

Is it any wonder that Rudy Mancke's most requested-of-Santa gifts over the years have been books on nature?

Pages