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Cristina Segarra
Mike Switzer/SC Public Radio

 For more than 20 years, our next guest has been busy turning flower petals from gardens, memorial services, weddings, and other events into jewelry.  She has grown the business from one employee into a full staff.

Mike Switzer interviews Cristina Segarra, CEO and founder of Flowers Forever and Bellabeads in Columbia, SC.

Practicing

Nov 1, 2017
A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

When I was a little boy just starting violin lessons, my teacher’s instructions were that I should practice a half hour every day. For a six-year-old this seemed an enormous load. I liked the violin… but a whole half hour, every day? 


South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"A" is for Allen, Gilbert Bruce [b. 1951]. Poet, fiction writer, educator. A native New Yorker, Allen moved to South Carolina in 1977—becoming an English professor at Furman. His first collection of poetry, In Everything: poems, 1927-1979 appeared in 1982 and was followed by three other volumes. In 1991, with fellow Furman English professor William E. Rogers, Allen became co-founder and co-editor of Ninety-Six Press. Focusing primarily on the works of South Carolina poets, the press has produced more than a dozen books.

Island Applesnails

Nov 1, 2017
An Island Apple Snail.
Roo Reynolds [CC BY-NC 2.0] via Flickr

Apple Snails are an invasive species, released into South Carolina's environment by the dumping of aquariums by hobbyists.

Indispensible Three

Oct 31, 2017
A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

It’s always fun to propose lists of the “ten best” of something – or the ten worst of something, for that matter. But when it comes to thinking about composers of classical music, there’s a word I like better than “best,” and that word is indispensable. And the number I have in mind isn’t ten, but rather three. 


"W" is for Wellford

Oct 31, 2017
South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"W" is for Wellford [Spartanburg County; population 2,030] Located in west-central Spartanburg County between the North and Middle Tyger Rivers, Wellford was once part of the hunting grounds of the Cherokee Nation. For most of the 19th century the future site of Wellford remained a settlement of scattered farms. After the 1876 arrival of the Danville and Richmond Railroad, a depot and water tank were constructed beside the tracks—and soon businesses followed. Homes, churches and schools soon followed.

This week Bobbi Conner talks with Dr. John Vena about MUSC’s participation in a large National Institutes of Health Initiative—called ECHO—which is studying environmental influences on the health of children.  Dr. Vena is a Professor and the Founding Chairman of the Department of Public Health Sciences at MUSC.

Camel Crickets

Oct 31, 2017
A male camel cricket.
Jenn Forman Orth [CC BY-NC-SA 2.0] via Flickr

Camel crickets and closely related cave crickets belong to a large group of insects. They are found throughout the world with over 100 different kinds found in the United States and Canada.

A nurse instructs students on the use of IV medications.
Photo courtesy University of South Carolina

Nursing has been described as a virtually recession-proof occupation, one that will always be in demand.  Even so, the heads of nursing departments at both the University of South Carolina and Midlands Technical College decry the critical need for bedside nurses, in spite of the fact that their nursing programs are full.   They cite bedside nursing is physically demanding, and added to 12-hour shifts, night and weekend work and new positions in other areas of nursing as reasons for the shortage.

Edgar Allan Poe mural above the fireplace, Poe's Tavern Sullivan's Island, SC.
Victoria Hansen/SC Public Radio

Whether you're walking down Raven Avenue or biting into a Gold Bug Burger at Poe's Tavern, you are certain to find plenty of Edgar Allan Poe treasure on Sullivan's Island.  The elusive 19th Century writer has direct ties to the island.  But they weren't discovered until decades after his death, even though there are clues in his writings.

"In his own time, Poe essentially covered up the fact that he had been an enlisted man in the Army," said College of Charleston American literature professor Scott Peeples.  "That of course including his being stationed at Fort Moultrie."

"There is no season..."

Oct 30, 2017
Nathaniel Hawthorne
Matthew Brady/Library of Congress [Public Domain]
Image of Gen. Andrew Pickens, 1739 - 1817. A photo of an oil painting hung in Fort Hill in Clemson, South Carolina.
blahedo [CC BY-SA 2.5] via Wikimedia Commons

In his new book, The Life and Times of General Andrew Pickens: Revolutionary War Hero, American Founder (2017, UNC Press), Dr. Rod Andrew, Jr., of Clemson University, explores the life of the hard-fighting South Carolina militia commander of the American Revolution, was the hero of many victories against British and Loyalist forces. In this book, Andrew offers an authoritative and comprehensive biography of Pickens the man, the general, the planter, and the diplomat.

A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

I’ve spoken about this before, but the subject seems to come up a lot, so why not go over it again: in America, 99.97 per cent of the people who play the flute for a living call themselves flutists, not flautists. That’s not a scientific number, but I think it’s pretty accurate.


South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for Salley, Alexander Samuel [1871-1961]. Historian. A Citadel graduate, Salley developed a fascination for local historical records. From that time forward, he wrote continuously on South Carolina topics, producing countless articles and over 100 monographs. In 1899 Salley became the Secretary, treasurer, and librarian, at the South Carolina Historical Society. The discovery of long-lost revolutionary war records led him to campaign for the proper custody and care of these priceless materials.

Sickle Cell Research

Oct 30, 2017

This week Bobbi Conner talks with Dr. Julie Kanter about several new therapies being developed to improve treatment for Sickle Cell Disease.  Dr. Kanter is an Associate Professor of Hematology/Oncology and Director of Sickle Cell Disease Research at MUSC.

John Warner
Concepts to Companies

A weekly update of the entrepreneurial activity in South Carolina.

Mike Switzer interviews John Warner is co-founder of Concepts to Companies and founder of the Swampfox Facebook page, based in Greenville, S.C.

Teri Thornton
Kwaku Alston

Piano Jazz remembers vocalist and pianist Teri Thornton (1934 – 2000), who lost her battle with cancer in the year after this 1999 session. Thornton first wowed audiences in 1963 with her hit recording of "Somewhere in the Night" from the television series Naked City. Her comeback to the jazz world was highlighted in 1998 when she won the Thelonious Monk Vocal Competition. On this Piano Jazz, she and McPartland team up for an unforgettable "I'll Be Seeing You." Thornton performs her signature song, "East of the Sun and West of the Moon."

South Carolina Focus
SC Public Radio

The curtain surrounding the ongoing probe into alleged Statehouse corruption was raised some this week as special prosecutor David Pascoe alleged for the first time in open court that the powerful Republican political consultant, Richard Quinn, Sr. is at the center of what he called a “sphere of unlawful influence over elected officials." Quinn and four current and former legislators were indicted last week on criminal conspiracy charges.

A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

Today is October 27 – and it was on October 27, 1917, that the great violinist Jascha Heifetz made his American debut in Carnegie Hall. I say great – many people would call Heifetz the greatest, a violinist who dazzled audiences with his stupendous technical ability, melted hearts with his gorgeous tone, and inspired thousands of young musicians to play more beautifully than they ever thought they could. 


South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"G" is for Greer, Bernard Eugene (b. 1948). Author. While working as a prison guard at Columbia's notorious Central Correctional Institution, Greer took creative writing classes at USC and later earned an MA in creative writing from Hollins College. He then worked on a fishing boat in Maine. During a long Maine winter, he began to forge his experiences as a prison guard into Slammer, his first novel. It was a critical and popular success.

Sea Cucumbers

Oct 27, 2017
A sea cucumber.
US Embassy Canada

A listener finds hundreds of sea cucumbers on the beach at Pawleys Island.

Kelly and David Schlitter
Mike Switzer/SC Public Radio

You may have heard about our next guests’ company from a recent mention on this show during one of our regular interviews with John Warner, who is always talking up the entrepreneurial activity in our state.  And this company certainly has one of the most unusual products we’ve come across in a while.  Simple steel connectors that allow you to build just about anything using inexpensive conduit pipe.

Mike Switzer interviews Kelly and David Schlitter, founders of Maker Pipe based in Pendleton, SC. 

Modern Stuff

Oct 26, 2017
A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

There are many people who say they love classical music, but not “that modern stuff.” What’s interesting is that some of “that modern stuff” is well over a hundred years old. Sometimes the term “modern” is just a stand-in for “unfamiliar,” and it’s true that some listeners have no appetite or patience for music that’s unfamiliar, and aren’t even willing to give it a try. That may be their loss… but then again we’re all entitled to stick to what we know and love. 


"D" is for Dispensary

Oct 26, 2017
South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"D" is for Dispensary. In 1892 South Carolina created the Dispensary, a liquor monopoly. In the early 1890s the state was poised to adopt statewide prohibition. Governor Benjamin Tillman, however, pressured the legislature to pass instead his proposal for state liquor monopoly legislation. Basing his idea on European models, Tillman portrayed the dispensary as a compromise between the private sale of liquor prohibition that would promote temperance and clean up politics. Counties could choose either to have a dispensary or prohibition.

Sooty Tern

Oct 26, 2017
An adult sooty tern.
Duncan Wright, USFWS [Public domain] via Wikimedia Commons

A lowcountry vet finds a juvenile sooty turn, likely blown in by a storm.

The last time we had our next guest on this show, he was running our state’s pre-eminent public-private partnership known as SCRA.  Last year, he left SCRA and took a position with an organization that is working to bring more materials-based education to South Carolina.

Mike Switzer interview Bill Mahoney, managing director of Ohio-based ASM International.

Mr. and Mrs. Mark Cain sign their wedding certificate before friends at the Columbia Fireflies ball park.
Tut Underwood/ SC Public Radio

A recent wedding at the home of the Columbia Fireflies minor league baseball team would seem unusual to most people, but to a group of University of South Carolina students, it’s just part of a class.  The wedding planning class is included in the curriculum of the Hotel, Restaurant and Tourism Management program, and for at least a decade has had the dual advantage of giving students experience in all the details that go into planning a wedding and providing the bride and groom with a free wedding and honeymoon.  The catch?  They must give the students total control over everything.  But s

World War II Veterans A Vanishing Generation

Oct 25, 2017
Families say goodbye to USS Yorktown veterans.
Victoria Hansen/SC Public Radio

95 year old Bill Watkinson and 97 year-old Arthur Leach have been coming to the USS Yorktown Reunions just outside of Charleston for decades.  Both were fighter pilots aboard the ship during World War II. But each year, they find fewer of their own.

"It's interesting to see those of us who are still standing and those of us missing," said Watkinson.  "The missing list is getting pretty long.

Lou Alice James is the 200th homeowner to receive assistance from the Midlands Flood Recovery Group. Here, she clings to the one family heirloom that survived the mold, a crystal candlestick.
Olivia Aldridge/SC Public Radio

Early this month, South Carolina reached the 2-year anniversary of the devastating October 2015 rain event, offering a natural opportunity to pause and observe the many tragedies that the widespread flooding wrought, and the many triumphs of recovery that have followed. The Midlands Flood Recovery Group, for its part, celebrated a significant milestone in its flood recovery narrative this month: the 200th home repaired by the group and the gift of a restored home for one resilient flood survivor.

Mesmer

Oct 25, 2017
A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

If you explore the history of psychotherapy, you’ll come upon the name Franz Anton Mesmer. Mesmer was born in Germany in 1734, and it was Mesmer who invented the term “animal magnetism,” which is what he called the mysterious force, or fluid, that flowed through his own body and that he could redirect for therapeutic purposes. 


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