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South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"D" is for Dispensary"C" is for Catawba Pottery. Among the Catawba Indians in present-day York County, an unbroken chain of pottery production has helped preserve a cultural identity that was nearly lost after European settlement. Traditionally, women made pottery; but when the population fell to less than a hundred  in1849, everybody had to make pottery. This activity has helped maintain community traditions and is now one of the purest folk art forms in the United States. Production methods have not changed much since around 600 C.E.

Heliconius charitonius (zebra longwing butterfly),Florida.
By James St. John [CC BY 2.0] via Wikimedia Commons

The zebra longwing butterfly is not common in South Carolina.

About 10 years ago our next guest and his wife, Margaret, decided to give up their lucrative careers and New York City living to return to the city where they married and start a small business centered around their favorite thing: gourmet food.  Their cafe and market has since expanded to five locations including their most recent in Nashville, their first outside of South Carolina.

Mike Switzer interviews Kris Furniss, co-owner of Caviar and Bananas in Charleston, SC.

A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

The most common tempo markings in music are words like allegro, adagio, and andante. But often composers indicate expression along with tempo, and this is when foreign-language dictionaries can come in handy. I could make a long list of interesting tempo and expression markings, but here are two of my favorites: 


South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"B" is for Beech Island [Aiken County; population 4,834]. Named for the beech trees growing in the wetlands of the nearby Savannah River swamp—and possibly a dead river island—Beech Island began in the 1680s as the Indian trading post, Savano Town. In 1716, the British constructed Fort Moore at Savano Town to protect the upcountry trade routes and to guard the western entrance to the colony. With the creation of New Windsor Township, offers of free land attracted European immigrants. Among them were a group of Swiss settlers recruited by John Tobler.

Black Witch Moth

Oct 24, 2017
A male Ascalapha Odorata or commonly known as the Black Witch Moth.
Happycoder89 [CC BY 3.0] via Wikimedia Commons

A listener finds a black witch moth--a rare species for South Carolina.

This week Bobbi Conner talks with Dr. Stephen Duncan about his research to find cures for rare childhood diseases.  Dr. Duncan is a Professor and Chair in the Department of Regenerative Medicine and Cell Biology at MUSC.

It probably won’t surprise you to know that Americans are among the most charitable people on the planet.  According to a recent Gallup World Poll, the USA ranked #1 or #2 for each of the last four years (2013 – 2016).  Our next guest says while South Carolinians are just as charitable, there are some ways you may not know about that can help you make the most of your charitable giving.

Mike Switzer interviews Jeff Wildes, a certified financial planner in Georgetown, SC.

Jonathan Dean and his father, Scottie Dean, Columbia 2016
StoryCorps

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, an oral history project where friends and loved ones interview each other. At the StoryCorps mobile booth in Columbia in 2016, Scottie Dean talked with his son Jonathan about their family, and why he values every day with them. Here, seven-year-old Jonathan asks his dad how he likes his life now.

Glass Armonica

Oct 23, 2017
A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

In May of 1761, Benjamin Franklin was in Cambridge, England, and he heard a man play a performance on musical glasses. They were crystal wine glasses filled with different levels of water, and when the performer rubbed the edges of the glasses, they produced different notes. 


This week Bobbi Conner talks with Dr. Clarissa Clemmens about the signs, symptoms and treatment of Strep Throat in children and teens.  Dr. Clemmens is a Pediatric Ear, Nose and Throat Specialist at MUSC Children’s Health.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"A" is for Archdale, John [1642-1717]. Proprietor. Governor. In 1664 Archdale was in New England. In 1681 he purchased a share of the Carolina Proprietorship in trust for his son Thomas Archdale. From 1683 to 1686 he served as Governor of North Carolina in the absence of Seth Sothel. In August 1694 his fellow proprietors chose him to be governor of the Carolinas and he arrived in Charleston the following year. He had been given broad discretion to settle the factionalism that had made governing South Carolina difficult.

Vaejovis carolinianus - Southern Unstriped Scorpion.
Glen Peterson [CC BY-NC-SA 2.0] via Flickr

The southern unstriped scorpion was, for many years, the only scorpion found in South Carolina

It is the only scorpion native to much of the Appalachian states: Kentucky, West Virginia (S), Virginia (SW), North and South Carolina (W), Georgia (North, not coastal or southern, where Centruroides hentzi is found), Alabama (N, ditto), Mississippi (NE), Louisiana (tiny, disjunct, area NE of Baton Rouge near MS border), and Tennessee.

Andy Owens
Mike Switzer/SC Public Radio

An update of the news, events and issues that are trending right now across South Carolina's business community.

Mike Switzer interviews Andy Owens, managing editor of SCBizNews, the company that publishes the Columbia Regional Business Report, Charleston Regional Business Journal, GSA Business and SCBizNews magazine.

Makota Ozone
Courtesy of the artist

In 1984 when pianist Makoto Ozone was McPartland's guest for the first time, he had become known as a rising jazz star. In his early 20s he was already a master technician with many keyboard influences, including Oscar Peterson, but he first heard jazz from his father at home in Kobe, Japan. In this session he displays his powerful, hard-driving style, soloing on "Love for Sale" and "Here's that Rainy Day." Then Ozone joins McPartland for swinging duets on "Everything Happens to Me" and "You Stepped Out of a Dream."

(Originally broadcast 05/19/17) South Carolina native "Princess" Pamela Strobel ruled a small realm, but her powers ranged far and wide. Her speakeasy-style restaurant in Manhattan was for three decades a hip salon, with regulars from Andy Warhol to Diana Ross. Her iconic Southern dishes influenced chefs nationwide, and her cookbook became a bible for a generation who yearned for the home cooking left behind in the Great Migration. One of the earliest books to coin soul food, this touchstone of African-American cuisine fell out of print more than forty years ago.

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Goats are a special challenge for livestock producers because they’re so clever. Sheep are considered docile for a reason, you can put them in almost any enclosure and they’ll happily stand there all day chewing their cud. But not goats – they are the animal world’s equivalent to the escape artist Houdini.

Galilei

Oct 20, 2017
A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

Galileo, whose full name was Galileo Galilei, was one of the great figures in the history of science. What may surprise you is that Galileo’s father, Vincenzo Galilei, was one of the great figures in the history of Western music. 


South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"M" is for Manigault, Gabriel [1704-1781]. Merchant, legislator. Born in Charleston, Manigault rose from relatively modest origins to become the leading merchant and private banker in colonial South Carolina. He operated retail shops and also owed several trading vessels. He never had business partners and preferred to conduct business by himself. Manigault also had extensive real estate holdings in the Charleston area. He held a number of public positions including that of public treasurer. Twice, he declined appointment to the Royal Council.

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Sericea lespedeza is an imported perennial legume that can grow in a wide variety of soils. Since it’s a legume, it can change atmospheric nitrogen into a plant usable form through its association with bacteria that colonize its root system. Auburn University has done more research than any other institution on this sericea lespedeza for a variety of uses, from stabilizing eroded areas and road banks to growing it as a perennial hay crop.

Red Bats

Oct 20, 2017
Eastern Red Bat, Lasiurus borealis (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae)
Matthew O'Donnell [CC BY-NC-SA 2.0] via Flickr

Red bats are common South Carolina.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"P" is for Pike, John Martin [1840-1932]. Clergyman, editor, publisher. A Canadian and ordained Methodist clergyman, Pike was invited to preach at Columbia’s Washington Street Methodist Church. He moved to the state and served churches in in Lynchburg, Sumter, Summerville, and Charleston. In 1893 he became editor of a periodical, The Way of Faith.

Lisa Adams
Mike Switzer/SC Public Radio

Event venues continue to be in high demand across South Carolina for corporate workshops, retreats, and of course, weddings.  A few years ago, our next guest decided that their historic family plantation would fit well into this market, and since then, she says they have not regretted it.

Mike Switzer interviews Lisa Adams, executive creative director of Wavering Place near Eastover, SC.

A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

Musicians tend to tell lots of stories about funny things that have happened on stage during concerts. Often the stories are about disasters or near-disasters, and to be honest, they usually seem much funnier later on than the events themselves felt when they were actually happening. 


South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"L" is for the Lancaster Courthouse and Jail. During the 1820s, the noted architect Robert Mills designed at least 14 courthouses and 14 jails throughout the state. The Lancaster courthouse and jail are among the best surviving examples of his work from this period. The two-story brick courthouse is set on a raised basement and is characterized by Palladian symmetry and features a pedimented portico with modified Tuscan columns. The vaulted ground story has walls two feet thick. The courthouse has remained in use since its construction.

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Goats and sheep are called small ruminants. Ruminants are animals with four-chambered stomachs, and they regurgitate partially digested food, called cud, and chew it more thoroughly.

Red-Eyed Vireo

Oct 19, 2017
Red-eyed Vireo
Andy Reago & Chrissy McClarre [CC BY 2.0] via Flickr

A listener spots a red-eyed bird he cannot identify.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"M" is for McNair, Robert Evander [1923-2007]. Attorney, legislator, governor. After serving in the Pacific theater during World War II, McNair graduated from USC and moved to Allendale—the hometown of his wife, Josephine. From 1951 until 1963 he represented Allendale County in the South Carolina House of Representatives. In 1962 he was elected lieutenant governor. When Governor Donald Russell resigned in April 1965, McNair became governor. He was elected to a full term in 1966.

If you haven’t noticed, there are a lot of new hotels under construction in our state.  In fact, the number is at a high for the current growth cycle.  But our next guest says that this growth is not without its challenges.

Mike Switzer interviews Bruce Collins with OTO Development, a hotel builder, owner, and operator in Spartanburg, SC that specializes in energy and environmentally-friendly hotel construction.

Retired Army Major Miguel Santana stands in front of his home in Columbia. Santana says he is a victim of contractor fraud and it's stalling his flood recovery.
Thelisha Eaddy/SC Public Radio.

Since 2005, the National Center for Disaster Fraud (NCDF) has received over 70,000 complaints from 50 states, 6 territories, and 4 countries involving over 50 natural and man-made disasters. Retired Army Major Miguel Santana says after the October 2015 flood, he became a victim of contractor fraud. His costly mistake is stalling recovery for what was to be his retirement home.

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