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South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"B" is for Bennett, Thomas, Jr. [1781-1865]. Governor. With his father, Bennett built a lucrative lumber and rice mill business in Charleston. He was active in the Chamber of Commerce and served as a director of the Bank of the State of South Carolina, and the Louisville, Cincinnati, and Charleston Railroad. He was mayor of Charleston and served six terms in the South Carolina House of Representatives—and was its Speaker. He was elected to the State Senate in 1819, but resigned a year later when he was elected Governor.

This week Bobbi Conner talks with Dr. Patrick O’Neil about healthy weight management and tips to lose excess weight.  Dr. O’Neil is a Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Director of the Weight Management Center at MUSC.

John Warner
Concepts to Companies

A weekly update of the entrepreneurial activity in South Carolina.

Mike Switzer interviews John Warner is co-founder of Concepts to Companies and founder and CEO of Swampfox, an entrepreneur-centric social media company, based in Greenville, S.C.

Pieces not Parts

Jan 1, 2018
A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

It’s hard to write a good piece of music, a piece whose elements fit together in ways that make sense, a piece that has a beginning, a middle, and an end and that leaves the listener feeling that the time spent listening has been worthwhile. And I don’t know about you, but when I read a review saying that a piece is constructed entirely of “shimmering hazes of sound,” or “a parade of fascinating effects,” or “random rhythmic bursts and captivating colors,” I’m usually pretty sure that it’s a piece I’m not terribly interested in hearing.

French-Canadian pianist and composer Lorraine Desmarais made her first appearance in the United States at the 1986 Great American Jazz Competition, where she took the highest honors. In 2012 she was awarded the prestigious Order of Canada for her work bringing Canadian jazz to the world. She was McPartland’s guest for this 1991 Piano Jazz. She performs a few of her own compositions, “The Third King” and “Memoir,” along with a set of standards.

News & Talk Stations: Sat, Jan 06, 8 pm | News & Music Stations: Sun, Jan 07, 7 pm

Dr. Lorien Foote
[CC BY-NC-ND 2.0] / University of Central Arkansas

(Originally broadcast 09/15/17) - During the winter of 1864, more than 3,000 Federal prisoners of war escaped from Confederate prison camps into South Carolina and North Carolina, often with the aid of local slaves. Their flight created, in the words of contemporary observers, a "Yankee plague," heralding a grim end to the Confederate cause. In The Yankee Plague: Escaped Union Prisoners and the Collapse of the Confederacy (2016, UNC Press) Dr.

Happy New Year!

Jan 1, 2018
NatureNotes
SC Public Radio

Start the year with a nature walk!

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"A" is for Asian religions. In 1965, the US Congress passed laws liberalizing existing statutes regarding the entry of Asian immigrants. This had a significant effect on the religious landscape of South Carolina. By the 1980s the state had become home to emergent communities of Asian immigrants—East Indians, Cambodians, Vietnamese, and Laotians from Southeast Asia.  Prior to the 1960s the most notable Hindu presence in the state was the Meher Baba Spiritual Center in Myrtle Beach.

This week Bobbi Conner talks with Dr. Christine Holmstedt about the signs and symptoms of stroke and why prompt treatment is essential. Dr. Holmstedt is an Associate Professor of Neurology and Emergency Medicine and the Medical Director of the Tele-Neuroscience at MUSC. 

Our program today features an excerpt from the University of South Carolina Moore School's recent Economic Outlook Conference.

Today's excerpt comes from from Cheryl Stanton, executive director of the South Carolina Department of Employment and Workforce in Columbia, SC.

This is the way the new Real I.D.s will look when they are available to South Carolinians between the end of the first quarter of 2018 and Oct. 1, 2020.  The gold star in the upper right corner denotes the card as a Real I.D.
Photo courtesy S.C. Dept. of Motor Vehicles

The Real I.D. Act of 2005 was passed by Congress in the wake of the Sept. 11 attacks to standardize government-issued identifications, like drivers' licenses, for security purposes.  Beginning in 2018, South Carolinians will be able to get a Real I.D., which they must have by Oct. 1, 2020, in order to do activities such as board a commercial airplane, visit a secure federal building or a military post. 

Casals' Birthday

Dec 29, 2017
A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

Today we celebrate the birthday of Pablo Casals. Casals, called Pau Casals in his native Catalan language, was born on December 29, 1876, and he lived for almost a century, dying in 1973.


"W" is for Wright, Mary Honor Farrow [1862-1946]. Educator. Born into slavery in Spartanburg County, Wright received her early education from northern teachers who came to South Carolina after the Civil War. In 1879, after graduating from Claflin University, she accepted her first teaching position in Inman, where she held classes in a brush arbor. She later organized schools and taught in mill villages and churches in Spartanburg and Saxon. In 1904 she organized a school in her home for black children who were to young to walk to the nearest black school.

Cold Weather Safety

Dec 29, 2017

Winter weather can turn hazardous quickly, but if you’re prepared, you can handle anything Mother Nature throws at you!  If you don’t already have an emergency kit, think about pulling together a few emergency items like batteries, candles, a first aid kit, et cetera.

Southern Flying Squirrel
Ken Thomas via Wikimedia Commons

Listeners rescue a small squirrel that usually sleeps during the day.

Cooper's Hawk

Dec 28, 2017
A Cooper's Hawk
TexasEagle [CC BY-NC 2.0] via Flickr

This splendid bird of prey can be identified by its long tail and relatively short wings.

Time and Meaning

Dec 28, 2017
A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

In music, time passes. But it mustn’t be without purpose or reasons: without . . . meaning. And that’s the point: Music can give meaning to time. If all the interwoven elements in a piece of music mean something—if they remind, reflect, comfort, inspire, or excite—then by definition the time it takes for them to do all that will mean something too.

Our program today features an excerpt from the University of South Carolina Moore School's recent Economic Outlook Conference.

Today's excerpt comes from Joan Robinson-Berry, vice president and general manager for Boeing South Carolina in North Charleston, SC.

"M" is for Magrath, Andrew Gordon [1813-1893]. Jurist, governor. After graduating from the South Carolina College, Magrath studied law at Harvard and with James L. Petigru. In 1856 his appointment as a federal district judge brought him national attention and controversy. In the cases surrounding two ships seized for being slave traders—the Echo and the Wanderer—Magrath declared that the federal statues on piracy did not apply to the slave trade. His decision was hailed in the South and condemned in the North.

Winter Weather Myths 2

Dec 28, 2017

We’ve talked about common cold weather myths, and one of the most common misconceptions about this time of year is that you don’t need sunscreen.  In fact, snow and ice can reflect up to eighty percent of harmful UV rays, so lather up with sunscreen even in the winter.

Dvorak on Spirituals

Dec 27, 2017
A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

The composer Ernest Bloch once wrote that it’s only by plunging one’s roots to the depths of one’s own people that one finds the common ground of all people. Antonin Dvorák expressed a similar sentiment, and here’s the advice that he gave to American composers at the beginning of the 20th century, after he had been introduced to African American Sprirtuals:

“I am now satisfied that the future music of this country must be founded upon what are called the negro melodies...

Cola Ukulele Band rehearses for an upcoming performance.
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

Over the past decade or so, the ukulele has grown tremendously in popularity among a wide variety of people, helped by its use by popular artists such as Jason Mraz and Ingrid Michaelson.  The trend hit the Midlands recently when University of South Carolina music student Tim Hall got a grant to start the Cola (not Columbia, though that’s where it’s located) Ukulele Band.  Since its beginning, the band has attracted members of all ages, from elementary school children to grandparents. 

Our program today features an excerpt from the University of South Carolina Moore School's recent Economic Outlook Conference.

Today's excerpt comes from Joan Robinson-Berry, vice president and general manager for Boeing South Carolina in North Charleston, SC.

"K" is for Kershaw, Joseph Brevard [1822-1894]. Soldier, Jurist. Kershaw, a native of Camden, was a member of the General Assembly and of the Secession Convention. In April 1861 he was a colonel of the Second South Carolina Regiment which played an active role in the Confederate victory at First Manassas. The next year he was promoted to brigadier general and given command of the brigade that saw action at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg.

Winter Weather Myths 1

Dec 27, 2017

Winter is here and with it comes some outdated information about the cold temperatures, but don’t let winter health myths get the best of you!  For starters, cold air does not make you sick.

Mediterranean Gecko

Dec 27, 2017
A Mediterranean Gecko.
Nathan Vaughn/Flickr

A listener spots a lizard near Charleston harbor...

Bearded Hedgehog Fungus
Lebrac, via Wikimedia Commons

Some naturalists find a massive fungus, sometimes known as a Lion's Mane fungus.

Narrative: "Together We Grew"

Dec 26, 2017
Marcia Peter and facilitator Felix Lopez, Columbia 2016
StoryCorps

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, an oral history project based on the idea that the stories of everyday people are the most important and interesting of all. When StoryCorps visited Columbia in 2016, Marcia Peters talked with facilitator Felix Lopez about her experience raising three children as a single mom.

Soothing Music

Dec 26, 2017
A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

When “classical” public radio stations surveyed their audiences some years back, the most common answer to the question, “Why do you listen to classical music,” was, “Because it’s soothing.” Now think of Beethoven for a moment, the man whose very name defines “classical music” for many people.  He wrote music that sends the soul soaring, that plumbs the depths of human despair, that shatters silence with violent assaults.  


Our program today features an excerpt from the University of South Carolina Moore School's recent Economic Outlook Conference.

Today's excerpt comes from South Carolina Governor Henry McMaster.

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