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"B" is for Baha'is

Nov 23, 2017
South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"B" is for Baha'is. Founded in 1844 as an outgrowth of the, Babi faith, the Baha'i faith is one of the world's youngest religions. Among its principles are the oneness of humankind, the common foundation of all religions, religion and science as integral parts of the truth, the equality of men and women, and the elimination of prejudice of all kinds. Charlestonian Louis G. Gregory introduced Baha'i teachings into South Carolina. Gregory was the son of a slave and a 1902 graduate of Howard University Law School. He made mission trips across the South.

It just stands in your kitchen quietly doing its job day in and day out.  You may not think about it much, but life certainly would be more difficult without your refrigerator!  Using your fridge seems like a no-brainer, but refrigerators and freezers require large amounts of energy to chill foods.  The manner in which you use yours can help reduce energy waste.  

Happy Harvest Time

Nov 23, 2017
NatureNotes
SC Public Radio

Best wishes for a happy Thanksgiving!

Debussy on Bach

Nov 22, 2017
A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

Here are a few words that one great composer wrote about another—and I wonder if you can guess who was writing about whom. Ready? “Once again one finds almost the entire piece is pure musical arabesque…In reworking the arabesque he made it more flexible, more fluid, and despite the fact that [he] always imposed a rigorous discipline on beauty, he imbued it with a wealth of free fantasy so limitless that it still astonishes us…” “We can be sure that [he] scorned harmonic formulas. He preferred the free play of sonorities whose curves…would result in an undreamed of flowering, so that the least of his manuscripts bears an indelible stamp of beauty.”


The Marbled Orb Weaver

Nov 22, 2017
Marbled Orbweaver (Araneus marmoreus).
Sturgis McKeever, Georgia Southern University, Bugwood.org

A listener reports a spider that look a bit like a pumpkin.

Each year, a national magazine based in our state, hosts a "Made in the South" awards program that recognizes artisans, inventors, and entrepreneurs from around our region.  And at the end of the year, the winners all come to our state to show off their wares and celebrate.

Mike Switzer interviews Jessica Derrick, with Garden and Gun magazine in Charleston, SC, hosts of their 2017 Jubilee, Dec. 1-3, 2017.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"A" is for Adams, James Hopkins [1777-1858]. Governor. Born in lower Richland County and educated at Yale, Adams was a successful cotton planter. He represented Richland County in both the South Carolina house and senate. In 1854, the General Assembly elected him governor. Although the state's voters had repudiated secession in 1850, he belonged to the radical faction that advocated immediate secession from the union.

No-Bake Energy Bars

Nov 22, 2017

Do you find that your energy drops off dramatically in the afternoon?  Are you struggling to stay awake and stay on task during the day?  While coffee and caffeine may offer a temporary pick-me-up, a better alternative is a light snack packed with protein, fiber and antioxidants to rev your energy and keep your brain firing on all cylinders.  Here is a great recipe for no-bake energy bars

photo of a roasted, whole turkey
Tim Sackton [CC BY-SA 2.0] via Flickr

(THE CONVERSATION) - 'Tis the season for giblets, wattles and snoods – oh my. On Thanksgiving and Christmas, Americans consume about 68 million turkeys – one for about every five of us. In fact, 29 percent of all turkeys gobbled down in the U.S. are consumed during the holidays.

photo of turkey
Ryan McDonough [CC BY 2.0] via Flickr

(THE CONVERSATION) - Intensive livestock farming is a huge global industry that serves up millions of tons of beef, pork and poultry every year. When I asked one producer recently to name something his industry thinks about that consumers don't, he replied, "Beaks and butts." This was his shorthand for animal parts that consumers – especially in wealthy nations – don't choose to eat.

These Narragansett turkeys are raised by University of South Carolina professor Joe Jones.  Though he keeps his flock small, the quality of the meat is far superior to mass produced turkeys.
Tut Underwood/ SC Public Radio

From 9 to 5, Joe Jones of Blythewood is a professor of marine science and environmental science at the University of South Carolina.  After 5, he becomes a farmer, raising sheep, pigs, chickens, and especially Narragansett turkeys, which makes him popular around Thanksgiving.   He and his wife keep their flock small, preferring quality over quantity.  Jones and his wife Amanda talk in this story about the difference between homegrown birds and the corporate, mass-produced turkeys most people consume (hint: price and flavor have a lot to do with the difference).  There are challenges to rais

Poster for "Eight Days a Week."
Apple Corps

The 2017 Ron Howard documentary film “The Beatles: Eight Days a Week - The Touring Years” highlights the cultural phenomenon of Beatlemania in the 1960s.  The movie captures America’s excitement as John, Paul, George and Ringo stormed the country at the forefront of the most popular musical revolution of the century, the British Invasion.   

Narrative: Growing Up as Preacher's Kids in Georgetown

Nov 21, 2017
Henry "Harry" Bull Jr., Sarah Clarkson, and Margaret Clarkson, Columbia 2016
StoryCorps

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, an oral history project that collects the voices of our times. At the StoryCorps mobile booth in Columbia in 2016, Margaret Clarkson interviewed her uncle and mother about growing up in Georgetown, South Carolina. Both in their late eighties at the time of taping, Henry Bull Jr., who goes by Harry, and Sarah Clarkson, are two remaining siblings of a family of seven children. Here’s Sarah Clarkson with her recollections of their childhood.

Timpani 2

Nov 21, 2017
A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

The timpani, or kettledrums were the original percussion instrument of the orchestra. The “kettle” of a kettledrum is called the “bowl,” and is made of copper or brass. The “head” of the drum, the surface that the player strikes, is a piece of Mylar plastic stretched over the rim of the bowl.


Grizzled Mantis

Nov 21, 2017
Grizzled Mantis - Gonatista grisea
Richard Crook [CC BY-NC-SA 2.0] via Flickr

A listener makes a rare sighting: a Grizzled Mantis.

Our next guest has appeared on our show a few times over the last decade because he continues to make his presence known in our state's aerospace industry, well before Boeing came to South Carolina.  He has been busy buying, selling and growing companies since 1997 and his latest move is into the global air cargo industry.

Mike Switzer interviews Steve Townes, CEO and founder of Ranger Aerospace in Greenville, SC, and his newest job title: chair of the board at ACL Airshop.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"Y" is for Yellow Jessamine. State flower. In 1924, the General Assembly chose the yellow, or Carolina, jessamine [Gelsemium sempervirens] as the state flower. Among the reasons sited were its being indigenous to every nook and corner of the state and that its perpetual return out of the dead of winter suggests the lesson of constancy in, loyalty to, and patriotism in the service of the State. Carolina jessamine is a twining woody vine with pointed, evergreen leaves. It climbs over bushes, fences, and tree limbs.

Emergency preparedness is a good idea any time of year, and your car is one place where you should definitely have a few emergency items on hand all the time.  Consider keeping things like jumper cables, a flashlight, a small first aid kit, water, and flares or reflective triangles.

This week Bobbi Conner talks with Dr. David White about diagnosing and treating ear infections (and chronic ear infections) in children.   Dr. White is a Professor in the College of Medicine and Director of the Pediatric Ear, Nose and Throat Program at MUSC Children’s Health.

Mystery Chrysalis

Nov 20, 2017
Cloudless Sulphur pupa collected 21 July 1993 near Statesboro, Bulloch Co., Georgia USA.
Sturgis McKeever/Georgia Southern University

A listener finds a chrysalis in his yard and wonders what kind of butterfly will emerge.

Timpani 1

Nov 20, 2017
A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

The timpani, also called kettledrums, have been regular members of the orchestra since about 1700. Their history can be traced back to ancient times in the Middle East, but they first appeared in Europe in the 1400's—they were originally imported from Turkey for use in cavalry bands. Timpani are tuned drums—they play notes, not just booms.  


Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz
SC Public Radio

Ellyn Rucker's light sensual vocals and smooth swinging piano produce a wonderfully intriguing mixture. Hailing from Colorado, Rucker broke into the jazz big leagues in the 1980s after she took up her musical career fulltime. She remains a staple on the Denver music scene. On this 1993 Piano Jazz, her versatility is evident when she performs Cole Porter's "Everything I Love," then McPartland joins in to play the title tune from one of Rucker's albums, This Heart of Mine.

John Warner
Concepts to Companies

A weekly update of the entrepreneurial activity in South Carolina.

Mike Switzer interviews John Warner is co-founder of Concepts to Companies and founder of the Swampfox Facebook page, based in Greenville, S.C.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"W'" is for Walker, William [1809-1875]. Teacher, composer, author. In 1835, the man known as "Singing Billy" Walker published Southern Harmony, a shaped-note hymnal using a four-shape [fa-so-la] system. The shaped-note style is a simplified musical notation developed to make it easier for untrained congregations to sing in harmony without instrumental accompaniment. Shapes [triangle = fa; oval = so; rectangle = la; and diamond = mi] were added to the note heads to help singers find pitch within major and minor scales.

Denim Crafts

Nov 20, 2017
Earth Sense
SC Public Radio

Denim is a versatile fabric.  It looks great, fits everybody, and holds up over time.  But there will come a time when you favorite jeans are too worn to wear.  Before you throw them out, think about ways that you can use the fabric!  Re-using and re-purposing those old pants can save you money and save space in the landfill!  And you can do all sorts of creative things with denim.  And you’ve already got ready made pockets for hanging organizers, pocket refrigerator magnets, or that canvas tote that would be perfe

Dr. J. Brent Morris
USC Beaufort

(Originally broadcast 07/14/17) Yes, Lord, I Know the Road: A Documentary History of African Americans in South Carolina, 1526 – 2008 (2017, USC Press) is the first comprehensive history of African Americans in the Palmetto State. From the first North American slave rebellion near the mouth of the Pee Dee River in the early sixteenth century to the 2008 state Democratic primary victory of Barack Obama, Dr. J.

This week Bobbi Conner talks with Dr. Jackie Kraveka about the latest developments in treating childhood cancer.  Dr. Kraveka is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics and a Pediatric Hematologist/Oncologist at MUSC Children’s Health.

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Davis Sander of South Pleasantburg Nursery came to the show recently with a collection of viburnums. One in particular caught my eye as it has great value for wildlife, especially pollinators and birds. Viburnum dentatum, arrowwood viburnum, gets its common name according to Michael Dirr because the very strong root shoots, this plant can sucker and spread, were used for the shafts of arrows by native Americans.

'Gator on Durham Creek, Berkeley County
Victoria Hansen/SC Public Radio

Ron Russell has been catching alligators in the Lowcountry for nearly 30 years.  Each fall, people hire him as a guide for the state's public hunt.  But this year, he says gators, especially the big ones, were harder to find.

"We've harvested the heck out of them with all three programs the last 12 years," said Russell.  "I think it's going to start showing up we can't maintain this every year without it actually hurting the population dramatically.  I've already seen the decrease in population just in this area."

A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

Claude Debussy in 1903 wrote about the importance of giving his imagination free rein. Five years later Debussy expanded on the theme in a published interview. “You know,” he said, “People leave their homes to get away from themselves and from their surroundings. I confess that I live only in my surroundings and in myself. I can conceive of no greater pleasure than sitting in my chair at this desk and looking at the walls around me day by day and night after night..."


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