scetv.org

The distinctive white shawl protest graffiti of the Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo makes its mark in Bariloche's central square.
McKay Savage [CC BY 2.0] via Flickr

The Buenos Aires Herald ceased publication in July of 2017, almost 141 years after its founding. The paper became famous, however, only in the latter part of the 20th century, for exposing the forced disappearances of Argentinians during the 1976-83 military dictatorship. Other newspapers in the country whitewashed this chapter of Argentina’s history.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

“A" is for Ashwood Plantation. Located in Lee County,  the Ashwood Plantation Project was established as a resettlement site for tenant farmers displaced during the Great Depression. In 1934, the Federal Emergency Relief Administration [FERA] acquired 7,000 acres south of Bishopville, including the 2,200-acre Ashwood Plantation of former governor Richard I. Manning. Other parcels ultimately raised the total to 11,000 acres. Project directors planned to settle about 200 families at Ashwood.

The Buenos Aires Herald ceased publication in July of 2017, almost 141 years after its founding. The paper became famous, however, only in the latter part of the 20th century, for exposing the forced disappearances of Argentinians during the 1976-83 military dictatorship. Other newspapers in the country whitewashed this chapter of Argentina’s history.

This week Bobbi Conner talks with Dr. William Basco about keeping children and teen safe from opioids in the home.  Dr. Basco is a Professor of Pediatrics and Director of the Division of General Pediatrics at MUSC Children’s Health.

Future drill sergeants practice their techniques on their fellow trainees at Fort Jackson. (File)
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

A new study finds South Carolina among ten states with a larger number of unfit Army recruits compared to the rest of the nation. The research comes from the Citadel, a military school in Charleston, and shows potential soldiers who are not physically fit are more likely to be injured during basic training, costing the Department of Defense and putting our nation's military readiness at risk.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"E" is for Edwards, William Augustus [1866-1939]. Architect. Edwards began his career in Virginia, but, moved back to South Carolina as a partner in the firm of Wilson and Edwards. Edwards was the lead partner in several other architectural firms in South Carolina and, after 1908, in Atlanta.

Tammy Mainwarring
Mike Switzer/SC Public Radio

After a recent study commissioned by our next guest’s organization uncovered some serious skills gaps in our state’s information technology workforce, they decided to help employers address them with a series of upcoming workshops.

Mike Switzer interviews Tammy Mainwaring, president of IT-ology in Columbia, SC.

Spotted at the Feeder

Jan 12, 2018
NatureNotes
SC Public Radio

Rudy reports on the sightings at his backyard bird feeder.

State House Week
SC Public Radio

State lawmakers returned to Columbia this week for the 2018 session of the S.C. General Assembly. Fallout from last summer's collapse of the V.C. Nuclear is expected to dominate this year's session.  Also, this week the House of Representatives wasted little time in overriding Gov. Henry McMaster's veto of some $20 million dollars for new school buses.

Narrative: A Songwriter's Musical Upbringing

Jan 11, 2018
Musician and songwriter Jack "Jackie" Jeffords and his son Jason Jeffords, Columbia 2016
StoryCorps

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, an oral history project where friends and loved ones interview each other. At the StoryCorps mobile booth in Columbia in 2016, Jason Jeffords talked with his father Jackie Jeffords about his life as a musician and songwriter. Here, Jackie describes his musical childhood in a family with eight brothers and sisters.

Epworth Children's Home in Columbia will soon make available to the public a treat that its residents and visitors have enjoyed for decades: peanut butter ice cream, which has been produced at the home since the Great Depression.
Photo courtesy Riggs Partners, West Columbia, S.C.

For decades, Epworth Children's Home in Columbia has been well known in Methodist circles for two things: caring for children, and the unique dessert it has produced since the Great Depression: peanut butter ice cream.  The government sent the home large quantities of peanut butter to help give the children protein, and the cooks served it in every way they could think of, said Epworth President John Holler.   In those days, the home had a dairy, so someone suggested  trying to make ice cream with it. 

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"D" is for DeKalb, Johann [1712-1780]. Soldier. Born in Bavaria, DeKalb rose to the rank of brigadier-general in the French Army and decided to seek his military fortune in America. He was contracted as a major-general in the Continental Army and, along with Lafayette, arrived off the coast South Carolina, near Georgetown, in 1777.

As you are probably starting to find out, the new tax law is affecting a lot of things.  Possibly, even affordable housing.  In fiscal year 2017, South Carolina’s Housing Tax Credit program allocated over $12 million across 20 new housing developments.  But while the tax credits are still there, our next guest says that the new lower corporate tax rate may make them less attractive.

A Leaf-Footed Bug
Lyle Buss, Department of Entomology and Nematology, University of Florida

Leaf-footed bugs often over-winter as adults in South Carolina.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"C" is for Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge. Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1932 as a wintering ground for migratory waterfowl. Located in Charleston County Cape Romain stretches 22 miles along the coast between Charleston and the Santee River delta. In its shallow bays, tides combine the life-giving nourishment of the oceans with the nutrient-laden freshwaters of rivers to create a rich, productive environment.

In today’s multi-lingual world of commerce, many businesses are committing to translating their website and documents into the home languages of their customers and prospects.  But our next guest says that there is a lot more to translating than most companies realize.

Mike Switzer interviews Yuri Ivanov, CEO and owner of Ivannovation in Taylors, SC.

Mantis Fly

Jan 10, 2018
A Mantis Fly.
Pavel Kirillov [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

The front legs of the Mantis Fly resemble those of a Mantis.

Host Gavin Jackson discusses the upcoming 2018 South Carolina Legislative Session with The Post and Courier's Columbia Bureau Chief, Andy Shain.

Topics include the VC Summer nuclear situation, ethics reform, and more!


South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"B" is for Brewton, Miles [ca. 1765-1769]. A native Charlestonian, Brewton’s powerful family was allied to banking, enabling him to establish a career in finance and trade. Twice during the 1750s, he traveled to England to finish his education and establish commercial ties. Between 1756 and his death, Brewton conducted business in several partnerships and was part-owner in eight commercial vessels. His partnerships dealt largely with the exportation of domestic produce, but he also made substantial profits in the slave trade.

Joy Watkins
Mike Switzer/SC Public Radio

As our population continues to age, more and more people are entering the Social Security system.  But our next guest says that the big question for most people is: when is the best time to actually do so?  At age 62, 65, or later?

Mike Switzer interviews Joy Watkins, a certified financial planner with Anchor Investment Management in Columbia, SC.

A Western Visitor

Jan 9, 2018
A Rufous-Tailed Hummingbird.
Alfred Viola, Northeastern University, Bugwood.org

Western hummingbirds have been increasingly sited in the eastern U.S.

Close-up of gas nozzle refueling car.
Andreas [CC0 1.0] via Pixabay

A new gasoline tax credit that takes effect this year will give  South Carolina drivers a little relief from the cost of driving.  The tax credit can be filed for beginning in January 2019 for the 2018 tax year.  This credit is to help offset the annual 2-cent-per- gallon increase in the gasoline tax to be dedicated to road upkeep for the next five years (for a total of six years, or an eventual 12-cents per gallon).  SC Dept.

Pneumonia

Jan 9, 2018

This week Bobbi Conner talks with Dr. Lynn Schnapp about signs, symptoms and treatment of pneumonia.  Dr. Schnapp is a Professor and Director of the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, Allergy and Sleep Medicine at MUSC.

What a Week! Brrrr...

Jan 8, 2018
Surfboard Sledding in the Old Village of Mount Pleasant, SC.
Victoria Hansen/SC Public Radio

A winter storm brought rare snow and ice to South Carolina's Lowcountry last week. With a thaw finally in the weather forecast for the coast, and winter weather advisories in the Upstate, it's a good time to look back on the unusual--and beautiful--sights in the greater Charleston area, as captured last week by South Carolina Public Radio's Victoria Hansen.

"A" is for Asparagus

Jan 8, 2018
South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"A" is for Asparagus. Asparagus was an important cash crop in South Carolina from the 1910s until the mid-1930s.With cotton prices low and the boll weevil creeping closer, farmers in the "Ridge" counties of Aiken, Edgefield, and Saluda began planting asparagus to supplement declining cotton income. By 1916 they had organized as Asparagus Growers Association and shipped 44 railroad carloads to northern markets. High prices during World War I led farmers in neighboring counties to plant the vegetable.

 Rock Hill Mayor Doug Echols.  On Jan. 8, 2018, Echols will complete a 20 year tenure as the City's longest serving mayor.
City of Rock Hill, S.C.

Doug Echols concludes his 20 year tenure as Mayor of Rock Hill, SC on Jan. 8, 2018.  He is the longest serving Mayor in Rock Hill history.  Attorney and former City Council member John Gettys assumes the Mayor's Office.  Rock Hill is a City on the move.  It is now the fifth largest in the state, and is considered a model for successful planned growth.

John Warner
Concepts to Companies

A weekly update of the entrepreneurial activity in South Carolina.

Mike Switzer interviews John Warner is co-founder of Concepts to Companies and founder and CEO of Swampfox, an entrepreneur-centric social media company, based in Greenville, S.C.

Marbled Salamanders

Jan 8, 2018
A marbled salamander.
cotinis [CC BY-NC-SA 2.0] via Flickr

The Marbled Salamander is often found under logs or debris on flood plains.

This week Bobbi Conner talks with Dr. Dean Kilpatrick about the new Mass Violence and Victimization Resource Center, which is being created to provide services and resources for people affected by mass violence. Dr. Kilpatrick is the Director of the National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center at MUSC. 

Cover photo of a bird-filled sky above a line of trees at sunset.
Kathleen Robbins

Ed Madden, editor of Theologies of Terrain (Muddy Ford Press, 2017), writes that poet Tim Conroy “is a theologian of the best kind, a theologian of the ordinary.”

“He knows… [we] face crushing loss and daily difficulties. We have to learn to live the best we can here, now. … [Conroy] points us to a ‘cathedral’ of trees where we are encouraged to find not truth or healing but perspective—to measure ourselves ‘by how a towering / moment passes.’"

Tim Conroy and Ed Madden join Walter Edgar to talk about Conroy’s Theologies of Terrain.

Pages