WEPR-FM Transmission Interruption

Nov 5, 2017

Monday, November 13, through Friday, November 17, 2017, between the hours of 8:00 am and 5:00 pm,  WEPR-FM, Greenville, 90.1, will be periodically off the air because of work being done on the transmission tower.

Streaming will not be affected. We appreciate your patience.

On Thursday and Friday, five women testified before the Inter-American Court for Human Rights and demanded an investigation regarding sexual torture at the hands of Mexican police forces. The abuse happened in May 2006 following a clash between protesters and state forces in the state of Mexico.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The Western U.S. is just starting to recover after a prolonged, 16-year drought. A lack of water can force people to take a hard look at how they use it, and make big changes. That's what happened in southern Colorado, where farmers have tried a bold experiment: They're taxing themselves to boost conservation.

Colorado's San Luis Valley is a desperately dry stretch of land, about the same size as New Jersey.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

A new museum opened its doors to the public today in Washington, D.C. - the Museum of the Bible.

JUDAH WINEHEART: I'm really excited to see the Gutenberg Bible. They've got a leaf from the first edition.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Azzedine Alaia, the French-Tunisian designer known for his figure-sculpting fashions, has died at 77, the French Federation of Haute Couture and Fashion confirmed on Saturday.

In his more than four decades in the fashion industry, Alaia gained a reputation for going rogue; he refused to follow the calendar of international fashion weeks and released his collections only when he was ready. He rose to fame for his body-hugging designs that celebrated the female form.

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News and Features from APM and PRI

A scientist who finds pharmaceutical promise in the venom of cone snails

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Nestled inside its bright, patterned shell, the cone snail cuts a familiar figure in tropical waters — you may have even collected its shell on a walk along the beach. But watch your touch — every species of cone snail is venomous, and some, like Conus geographus, can even kill humans.

Who Killed The Passenger Pigeon?

21 hours ago

Crows, A Bird That’s Not Bird-Brained

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South Carolina Military and Veterans

Stories about South Carolina veterans, the history of the conflicts in which they served, and those on the home front.

Recovery

Stories of people and communities going about the work of recovery from the floods of 2015.

Piano Jazz

Jazz legend Marian McPartland hosted Piano Jazz for over 30 years. The show continues showcasing the top musicians of all time with broadcasts and podcasts from the archives.

South Carolina Public Radio News

'Gator on Durham Creek, Berkeley County
Victoria Hansen/SC Public Radio

Ron Russell has been catching alligators in the Lowcountry for nearly 30 years.  Each fall, people hire him as a guide for the state's public hunt.  But this year, he says gators, especially the big ones, were harder to find.

"We've harvested the heck out of them with all three programs the last 12 years," said Russell.  "I think it's going to start showing up we can't maintain this every year without it actually hurting the population dramatically.  I've already seen the decrease in population just in this area."

Mayor Steve Benjamin of Columbia commemorated his city's commitment to the Sierra Club's Ready for 100 Campaign in May.
Thelisha Eaddy/SC Public Radio.

Since President Trump announced the U.S. would exit the Paris Climate Agreement back in June, redoubled support for the agreement has come from the local level, with mayors from around the nation pledging their cities' support for the Agreement.

This is the way the new Real I.D.s will look when they are available to South Carolinians between the end of the first quarter of 2018 and Oct. 1, 2020.  The gold star in the upper right corner denotes the card as a Real I.D.
Photo courtesy S.C. Dept. of Motor Vehicles

The Real I.D. Act of 2005 was passed by Congress in the wake of the Sept. 11 attacks to standardize government-issued identifications, like drivers' licenses, for security purposes.  Beginning in 2018, South Carolinians will be able to get a Real I.D., which they must have by Oct. 1, 2020, in order to do activities such as board a commercial airplane, visit a secure federal building or a military post. 

More SC Public Radio News
From books to barbecue, from current events to colonial history, Walter Edgar's Journal delves into the arts, culture, history of South Carolina and the American South.
On The South Carolina Business Review, Mike Switzer, focuses on news from the state's business community with interviews of small business owners and business leaders …
How did the piano get its name? Why can’t you "reach" a crescendo? Who invented opera—and why? Answers to countless classical music questions from Miles Hoffman.

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S.C. Public Radio Offers HD Programming in Charleston

Both Classical and News Programming Available.

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