Update at 10:48 p.m. ET

Alina Zagitova and Evgenia Medvedeva are locked atop the standings in the women's singles figure skating competition at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics – and they seem headed for a duel to see who gets to win the first gold medal for the Olympic Athlete from Russia team.

The three Americans in the field — Mirai Nagasu, Karen Chen, and Bradie Tennell — will have to turn in eye-popping performances today to reach the podium. None of them scored above 70 points in their short program, as six other skaters did.

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens was indicted on one count of felony invasion of privacy and taken into custody in St. Louis in connection with reports of an extramarital affair that surfaced last month.

During that affair, Greitens is alleged to have taken a semi-nude photo of the woman and then threatened to blackmail her by publishing it if she revealed their relationship.

Two South Korean speedskaters who humiliated their teammate are facing a swift backlash from fans who are demanding the women be banned from the national team. The fans' petition has gathered more than 579,000 signatures over two days.

The painful drama played out on the ice on Monday during the pursuit team quarterfinals race when Noh Seon-Yeong was left behind by the two faster women on team, leaving Noh to cross the finish line roughly four seconds later — a glacial delay in the sport.

In trying to clarify his Wednesday comments about arming teachers and other school personnel, President Trump, a day later, aligned himself even more closely with the National Rifle Association on the issue of teachers with guns and beefing up school security.

So much so, they seemed, at times, to be reading from the same script.

Here's how the day started — with NRA Executive Vice President and CEO Wayne LaPierre at the Conservative Political Action Conference, or CPAC (emphasis ours):

Iran has announced its intent to establish a national cryptocurrency. In a tweet posted Wednesday, an Iranian official said that a test model for a "cloud-based digital currency" is being developed for submission to the Iranian banking system.

The official, Mohammad-Javad Azari Jahromi, heads Iran's Ministry of Information and Communications Technology. Jahromi made the announcement after a meeting with the state-owned Post Bank of Iran.

The school resource officer, a uniformed and armed deputy, was on the scene but didn't enter Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School last week when a gunman started firing at students and faculty members, Broward Sheriff Scott Israel said Thursday. Israel said the deputy stayed outside of the building in a defensive position during last week's attack.

Throughout his career as a preacher, the Rev. Billy Graham's message of faith drew massive crowds of believers to tents, arenas and stadiums. Next week, mourners will have a final opportunity to turn out for Graham.

His casket will lie in honor in the rotunda of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, Feb. 28, and Thursday, March 1.

West Virginia's public schools were closed Thursday, as teachers across the state walked out and protested for better pay and benefits from state lawmakers.

Gov. Jim Justice signed a bill Wednesday to give teachers a 2 percent pay raise starting in July, and an additional 1 percent pay increase in 2020 and 2021.

02/22/18: South Carolina Public Radio Afternoon News

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Listen to the latest afternoon news from South Carolina Public Radio for Thursday, February 22, 2018:

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The mass shooting that left 17 people dead on Feb. 14 at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, is still dominating headlines more than a week after the tragedy — and many of those headlines are overseas.

We spoke with two foreign correspondents based in the US about what it's like to cover mass shootings and gun rights for audiences overseas. Leila Macor reports from Miami for Agence France-Presse, and Estelita Carazzai is a Washington, DC-based correspondent for the Brazilian daily Folha de Sao Paulo.

Rugby is a game that favors big, strong players who can tackle their opponents to the ground. The Mexican women’s national team isn't big. In their green, white and red uniforms, the women look tiny next to some of their competitors.

But at an international qualifying tournament in Mexico City last year, the women showed off their biggest asset: speed. Over and over, they outran their rivals — so much so that they won the tournament and earned a spot in this year’s rugby sevens World Cup, which will be held in San Francisco in July.

Explaining the craze in TV reboots

4 hours ago

Every time you change the channel, it seems like a new reboot is popping up: Will & GraceMurphy BrownRoseanne. These are familiar names in TV, and they're having a come-back precisely because of that name recognition.

If you're a business that cultivates high-profile celebrity influencers, what do you do when one of them expresses displeasure to millions of followers? That's the position Snap finds itself in after Kylie Jenner tweeted that she doesn't open Snapchat anymore. Jenner, apparently, doesn't much like the app's new design, and neither do more than a million others who've signed a petition urging Snap to go back. That raises some questions about Snap's business model. 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

No one is there to greet customers as they enter the shop, which would be silent if it weren’t for the hum of refrigerators and the piped music that emanates from speakers on the ceiling.

This business, located in the basement of a hotel in downtown Seoul, has no clerk working behind the counter. Instead, a self-service kiosk verbally instructs shoppers to check out by swiping their purchases under a barcode reader and pay with a credit card.

Automation has arrived in one of South Korea’s most cherished institutions — the convenience store.

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