Unidentified African American soldier in uniform with marksmanship qualification badge and campaign hat, with cigarette holder in front of painted backdrop.
Library of Congress

Black South Carolinians in World War I

Upon the United States' entrance into World War I, President Woodrow Wilson told the nation that the war was being fought to "make the world safe for democracy." For many African-American South Carolinians, the chance to fight in this war was a way to prove their citizenship, in hopes of changing things for the better at home. Dr. Janet Hudson from the University of South Carolina joins Dr. Edgar for a public Conversation on South Carolina History, World War I: Black South Carolinian Soldiers...

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