South Carolina Public Radio News

Sexaual assault awareness and prevention efforts extend into the military. This T-shirt was on display during a Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month event at Kandahar Airfield in Kandahar province, Afghanistan, April 1, 2013.
U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Ashley Bell

The instance of sexual assault in the United States is growing at a rate that would surprise, even alarm, many people.  According to Shannon Nix, associate director of sexual assault and violence intervention and prevention at the University of South Carolina, one in four women - and one in six men – will be sexually assaulted at some point in their lives.   This high number doesn’t mean more assaults are happening, however.  Nix said it seems that way because more people are reporting it. 

The new Four Paws Animal Clinic recently opened a few blocks from its former location after more than two years of operations in a temporary building while it recovered from the 2015 flood and sought the right place for its new home.
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

For some, the so-called “thousand-year rain” and the floods that followed it in October 2015 may seem a long time ago.  But many are still recovering from the storm’s devastation.  After more than two years of operating from a temporary building, the 4 Paws  Veterinary Hospital was able to move back to a new location in Forest Acres after its original building bordering the flooded Gills Creek was ruined.  Dr. Nori Warren said the clinic got no help from FEMA, but its flood insurance came through, and the generosity of other vets around the country helped get them back in business with medi

Beth Drake, United States Attorney, with officials from SLED, SC Departent of Corrections, and the FBI.
Laura Hunsberger

The United States Attorney's Office announced the arrest of fourteen employees of South Carolina correctional facilities who are now facing Federal charges to bribery and bringing contraband in the state’s prisons. U.S. Attorney for the District of South Carolina, Beth Drake, says the charges resulted from an investigation that has been ongoing for years.

Popular State Park Reopens after Hurricane Damage

Apr 25, 2018
Hunting Island State Park Campground area.
Victoria Hansen/SC Public Radio

There’s a stop sign for campers pulling into Hunting Island State Park.  But visitors have likely slowed down long before.  The island has been closed for nearly two years following Hurricanes Matthew and Irma.  To the right of the entrance, campers once enjoyed breath taking beachside views.  Now storm damage takes their breath away.

The Williamsburg Regional Hospital's building in Kingstree was irreparably damaged during the 2015 floods.
Laura Hunsberger

For more than a year, the Williamsburg Regional Hospital has been serving patients from a temporary facility located right next to their old building. The hospital was damaged beyond repair during the thousand-year floods. Eventually, the hospital determined that they had to move out of the old building.

More SC Public Radio News

A Utah militia leader accused of trying to blow up a federal cabin in Arizona pleaded guilty in a Salt Lake City courtroom Thursday, as part of a late-hour plea deal that avoided a potentially lengthy federal trial.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

University of Michigan students Griffin St. Onge and Lauren Schandevel have published an online guide that anybody can edit called "Being Not Rich at UM." It's a Google Doc about navigating the costs of college that has grown to more than 80 pages.

What exactly makes a woman?

Track and field's world governing body thinks the answer has to do with levels of serum testosterone, at least when it comes to female runners competing in middle-distance races.

John Brennan's tenure as CIA director ended the same day that President Trump entered office last year, and since then, the former spy chief has been a relentless critic of the president.

"I think he is dishonest, he lacks integrity, he has very questionable ethics and morality, and he views the world through a prism of 'how it's going to help Donald Trump?,' " Brennan said in a wide-ranging interview with All Things Considered.

"I just think that he has not fulfilled the responsibilities of the president of the United States," Brennan added.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The children of the White House press corps added a little levity to what has been a notoriously fraught relationship, standing in for their parents at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. on Take Our Daughters And Sons To Work Day.

President Trump, who has practically made a mantra of the term "fake news," greeted reporters' kids in the Rose Garden Thursday, signing Make America Great Again hats and press cards while expressing a preference for their company.

Philippine authorities say they have conveyed to Kuwait their "strong surprise and great displeasure" over the Gulf country's decision to expel their envoy within a week. The expulsion announced Wednesday aims to punish Ambassador Renato Pedro Villa for the release of several viral videos last week that purported to depict the rescue of Filipino domestic workers.

Protests have erupted across Spain following a court's decision to clear five men of rape charges. The men, who have been dubbed 'La Manada' or 'The Wolf Pack' by Spanish media are accused of gang raping an 18-year-old woman during the 2016 San Fermin running of the bulls festival.

Listen to the latest afternoon headlines from
South Carolina Public Radio for
Thursday, April 26, 2018.

  

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News and Features from APM and PRI

Stagflation, explained

3 hours ago

Inflation is kicking into gear. But it’s not clear economic activity will shift much higher. Higher prices and slow growth are some key ingredients for “stagflation.”  Is that where we’re headed?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Ford Motor Co. is getting out of the car business

4 hours ago

Ford Motor Co. announced it's going to stop making cars for the North American market, save the iconic Mustang. The automaker plans to phase out five of its cars to focus on SUVs, trucks and crossovers. Dan Neil writes about cars for the Wall Street Journal. He talked with Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal about why American automakers like Ford are betting big on big vehicles. Neil says it’s all about profit.

Ana Raquel Minian grew up in Mexico City where, at home, “politics was discussed at the dinner table pretty much every day,” she says.

But to learn more about her own country, she decided to study its ties to the US. She started digging, studying history in the United States, earning her doctorate at Yale University. Now, after a decade of research, she's published her new book, “Undocumented Lives: The Untold Story of Mexican Migration.”

It’s hard to imagine a better time for her work to come out.

The global reach of 'Our Bodies, Ourselves'

5 hours ago

"Our Bodies, Ourselves" has long been called the bible for women's health, but it didn't start out that way.

The big corporate headline of the day is an industrial story, a commodities story, a global trade story and a good ol' wow-that's-an-interesting-move story. Ford Motor Company announced this morning it's going to stop making cars for the North American market, save the iconic Mustang. We'll talk about what that means for the company and the auto industry writ large. Then: Despite Facebook's recent privacy fiasco, the company reported a 63 percent increase in year-over-year profits for the first quarter. We'll explain why.

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Piano Jazz

Jazz legend Marian McPartland hosted Piano Jazz for over 30 years. The show continues showcasing the top musicians of all time with broadcasts and podcasts from the archives.

South Carolina Military and Veterans

Stories about South Carolina veterans, the history of the conflicts in which they served, and those on the home front.

The South Carolina Lede

Gavin Jackson and guests break down state political news and go inside the legislative happenings that could affect you, your family, and your pocketbook.
On The South Carolina Business Review, Mike Switzer, focuses on news from the state's business community with interviews of small business owners and business leaders …

Get weekly program highlights via e-mail.

How did the piano get its name? Why can’t you "reach" a crescendo? Who invented opera—and why? Answers to countless classical music questions from Miles Hoffman.

Recovery

Stories of people and communities going about the work of recovery from the floods of 2015.