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Listen Now: 2015’s Historic Flood: Past, Present, and Future

2015’s Historic Flood: Past, Present, and Future

All Stations: Fri, Sep 30, 12 pm | News Stations: Sun, Oct 2, 4pm

For the first time in almost 25 years, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs will pay for In Vitro Fertilization for wounded veterans.

As NPR's Quil Lawrence explains, Congress has reversed a law passed in 1992 that "prohibited the Department of Veterans Affairs from paying for IVF for veterans and their families." Quil tells our Newscast unit that "inside the stopgap spending bill passed this week is a provision to allow fertility treatments including IVF through VA health care." Here's more from Quil:

The U.N. is planning to launch its first space mission into orbit, packed with scientific experiments from countries that can't afford their own space programs.

It's teaming up with the Sierra Nevada Corporation, which makes the Dream Chaser, a reuseable spacecraft that, when it returns from orbit, can land at an ordinary airport. They formally announced the plans this week at the International Astronautical Congress in Guadalajara, Mexico.

On Friday, police released two videos of Tuesday's fatal shooting of an unarmed black man by officers in the San Diego suburb of El Cajon, Calif. Ugandan immigrant Alfred Olango was killed after, police say, he was uncooperative and refused to remove his hand from his pocket, then took what officers saw as a threatening position.

Olango's death led to almost immediate protests that lasted much of the week and grew progressively larger and angrier. The police say that by Thursday night two civilians had been assaulted and crowds had thrown bottles at officers.

Both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump released their medical records earlier this month, and now it's Libertarian nominee Gary Johnson's turn to boast that he is "extremely physically fit."

The letter from the former New Mexico governor's physician, Dr. Lyle B. Amer of Santa Fe, explains that the 63-year-old Johnson's "decades of dedication to physical fitness, diet, no drinking, and no smoking have paid dividends as far as his current extraordinarily good health at this time of his life." (We'll come back to that smoking line).

It's been one year since health officials in Michigan warned people in the city of Flint to stop drinking the tap water after a research team from Virginia Tech discovered elevated lead levels.

To this day, Flint's water is still not safe to drink without a filter. While funding has been scarce to replace corroded pipes, Congress reached a deal this week that could send millions of dollars in aid to Flint.

It's one of the most famous delis in the U.S., if not the world; its food has been called "nearly orgasmic" — but now comes word that New York's famed Carnegie Delicatessen will be closing its doors at the end of 2016.

On Friday, New Orleans received new flood maps from the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Overnight, more than half the population moved out of the so-called high-risk zone.

But with half the city at or below sea level and memories of massive flooding after Hurricane Katrina 11 years ago, some residents are worried these new maps send the wrong message.

Author Studs Terkel interviewed piano player Hots Michaels while entertaining guests at the Hotel Sherman, where he worked for decades.

Italian Police Recover Stolen Van Gogh Paintings

6 hours ago
Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pages

A Prairie Home Companion with Chris Thile

Though it has been months since the floods of October 2015, many South Carolinians are still in recovery. Narrative presents the personal reflections of these survivors.

Re-building and Renewing

Stories of people and communities going about the work of recovery from the floods of 2015.

Political Debates

NPR Politics Podcast

On the Keys

A Guided Tour of the Sonata

In this two-part series on tonality and sonata form, David Kiser gives the microphone over to Prof. Douglas Weeks of Converse College, who guides us through the sonatas of Mozart and Beethoven.

ETV Endowment Internship Program

From books to barbecue, from current events to colonial history, Walter Edgar's Journal delves into the arts, culture, history of South Carolina and the American South.
On The South Carolina Business Review, Mike Switzer, focuses on news from the state's business community with interviews of small business owners and business leaders …

Piano Jazz

Jazz legend Marian McPartland hosted Piano Jazz for over 30 years. The show continues showcasing the top musicians of all time with broadcasts and podcasts from the archives.

Song Travels with Michael Feinstein

Song Travels with Michael Feinstein is a syndicated series produced by South Carolina Public Radio, is hosted each week by five-time Grammy-nominee Michael Feinstein…