Turkey on Sunday continued a major attack inside northwestern Syria on a Kurdish militia it has called a "terror army" that presents a danger to Turkish security.

One day earlier Turkey sent tanks and armored vehicles lumbering across the border with Syria to add to artillery and aerial invasions already underway against the YPG, which Ankara seeks to drive out of the Afrin region of Syria.

Turkey also announced Saturday that the aerial component of its "Operation Olive Branch" had struck 108 YPG targets, as NPR's Peter Kenyon tells our newscast unit.

After five hours of uncharacteristic sniping and emotion, Germany's Social Democrats at a party congress in Bonn on Sunday voted 362-279 to enter into formal talks with Chancellor Angela Merkel to form a new German government.

It's a vital step to ending a nearly four-month long political crisis in Germany after last September's elections failed to give any party – including Merkel's conservatives – a majority. Previous attempts by the chancellor to join with other German political parties in a governing coalition failed.

Lawmakers in Washington are locked in a standoff that has led to a partial shutdown of the federal government, and weekend attempts to dig out of it haven't made much progress.

The standstill is starting to send ripples of anxiety through Washington and the rest of the country that a shutdown could continue into the week.

NPR would like to know how the shutdown is affecting you — whether it's your job or a government service you might need.

After talks with the leaders of Egypt and Jordan where he was made to explain and navigate the fallout from the Trump administration's controversial decision last month to acknowledge Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, Vice President Mike Pence is now on his way to meet with the Israeli government, which many expect will receive him warmly. Pence is not scheduled to speak with Palestinian leaders during his tour of the region.

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Shutdown Day 2

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Shutdown Latest

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News and Features from APM and PRI

01/19/2018: Shutdown countdown

Jan 19, 2018

As we tape this, the United States government is hours away from grinding to a halt, barring a last-minute deal. The blame game is already starting, and that's where we'll start today's show. Then we'll look at lessons federal workers learned from the last shutdown. Plus, the latest on Amazon Prime, IBM and electric vehicle sales.

You can’t live in Lawrence Park, Pennsylvania, and not know General Electric. The company designed and built the entire community — the street grid, the houses — over a century ago.

Jim Connelly spent his childhood in the shadow of GE’s 350-acre facility near Erie. And eight years ago, after college and the military, he came home to Lawrence Park and joined the ranks.  

“I really admired that factory when I was growing up, wondering what they did inside the fence,” he said.

After years of decline, IBM reports a revenue jump

Jan 19, 2018

A 4 percent revenue hike is not big news for many companies. But for century-plus firm IBM it’s the first in half a decade, and could signal that its focus on cloud computing is paying off.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Amazon is raising its monthly Prime membership rate, from $10.99 to $12.99. But the annual membership cost is staying the same, at $99. So what’s the logic here? Is Amazon trying to push more people into becoming annual members? Might the price hike prompt some people to drop the service altogether? What are the pros and cons of this strategy?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

01/19/2018: All about bonds

Jan 19, 2018

(Markets Edition) A lack of enthusiasm for older, lower interest rates is pushing bond yields up to their highest point in years. Chris Low, chief economist at FTN Financial, joined us to give us some perspective on what's happening. Next, we're looking at another type of bond: the one you pay to get out of jail. One group is seeking to bond 160,000 out of jail in dozens of U.S. cities over the next several years. 

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