South Carolina Public Radio News

A satellite view of Hurricane irma on September 5, 2017.
NOAA

Last month, the 2017 Atlantic Hurricane season finally came to a close. From June 1 to Nov. 30, South Carolinians were encouraged by SCEMD and other state agencies to be on high alert, especially after the severe storm impacts the state received during the 2015 and 2016 seasons. Now that hurricane season has wrapped up, we called on John Qualiariello, a Columbia-based meteorologist for the National Weather Service, to reflect.

Map: SC Revenue and Fiscal Affairs

Next week state officials expect the U.S. Census Bureau to officially estimate that the state’s population has passed the five million mark.  In fact, they believe the state reached that milestone back on June 8th.  Officials estimate that the state is growing by 157 people a day making it one of the fastest growing states in the country.  And it’s growing really fast.  It took 67 years for the state to grow by a million people, from one million to two million. It took just 17 years though to grow from four million to five million people.

StockSnap [CC0 1.0] via Pixabay

USC Retail Department Chair Mark Rosenbaum is excited by this year’s holiday shopping season.  A decade after the great recession that started in 2008, he said retail sales in the state and nation are back to 2007 levels.  The stock market’s record highs are just in time for retail and for consumer confidence, he said. 

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So far the reaction has been swift and strong to our investigation into Ballou High School in Washington D.C., where we shed light on chronic absenteeism and a pressure teachers say they felt to pass failing students and get them to graduation.

A secret Pentagon program existed for at least three years and spent more than $20 million in research on UFOs, according to multiple media reports published Saturday.

The program reportedly examined cases including incidents of military pilots claiming to have seen flying objects that appeared to "defy the laws of physics."

A Trump Voter On The President's Year

3 hours ago

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Rep. Leonard Lance On GOP Tax Bill

3 hours ago

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News and Features from APM and PRI

Feisal Omar/Reuters

Ninety-two Somali immigrants, set to be deported from the US, found themselves shackled at the hands and feet and kept aboard a plane for two days earlier this month. That part of the story is not in dispute.

The Somalis left Louisiana on Dec. 7. Their flight, chartered by US Immigration and Customs Enforcement, was bound for Mogadishu, the capital of Somalia. But the plane never arrived.

After landing in Dakar, Senegal, on Africa's west coast, the one-way flight became a round trip, back to the US. Why that happened, though, remains subject to dispute. 

Gene Blevins/Reuters

It’s been more than 250 days since it last rained in southern California.

Approximately 8,000 firefighters continue to battle massive wildfires, like the record-setting Thomas Fire.

Related: Firefighters race to get control of California wildfires

Reuters/AAP/Lukas Coch 

“A national tragedy.”

That’s how the Australian prime minister characterized the findings, released Friday, of a five-year investigation into child sexual abuse.

Malcolm Turnbull on Friday extended his gratitude to thousands of survivors who were brave enough to tell their stories. “It’s been very tough, often harrowing work,"  he said, "but above all I want to thank and honor the courage of the survivors and their families who’ve told, often for the first time, the dreadful stories of abuse that they received from people who actually owed them love and protection."

What happens when your designer-in-chief resigns?

Dec 15, 2017

The first chief creative officer at Diane Von Furstenberg left his job today. Jonathan Saunders lasted 18 months as the venerated fashion outfit's head designer. His two predecessors, who did not share the same title, didn't last much longer. The company also happens to have been without a CEO since November 2016. The troubles at DVF reflect the fashion industries larger struggles. Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal spoke with fashion writer Elizabeth Holmes to get a better sense of where the industry stands. The following is an edited transcript of their conversation.

The Department of Homeland Security has announced plans to reverse an Obama administration immigration rule. This one applies to the spouses of H-1B visa holders. The H1-B, you may recall, goes to skilled workers, often in the tech sector. The Obama administration gave the OK for the spouses of some of these skilled workers to get their own legal jobs in the U.S. DHS gave notice yesterday that it intends to end that work authorization. Here’s why.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

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Recovery

Stories of people and communities going about the work of recovery from the floods of 2015.

Piano Jazz

Jazz legend Marian McPartland hosted Piano Jazz for over 30 years. The show continues showcasing the top musicians of all time with broadcasts and podcasts from the archives.

Holiday Specials

Holiday Specials

Holiday Programming on South Carolina Public Radio's Music and News Stations

A two-decade, joint effort between South Carolina and North Carolina has sought to correct errors that began with the first survey, made in 1735!

Get weekly program highlights via e-mail.

How did the piano get its name? Why can’t you "reach" a crescendo? Who invented opera—and why? Answers to countless classical music questions from Miles Hoffman.

S.C. Public Radio Offers HD Programming in Charleston

Both Classical and News Programming Available.

SC Public Radio and SCETV Content Whenever, Wherever You Want it

On The South Carolina Business Review, Mike Switzer, focuses on news from the state's business community with interviews of small business owners and business leaders …

South Carolina Military and Veterans

Stories about South Carolina veterans, the history of the conflicts in which they served, and those on the home front.