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  [The Governor's State of the State address has been postponed until Wednesday, Jan. 24, at 7:00 pm.]

South Carolina Governor Henry McMaster will deliver his State of the State address before a joint session of the General Assembly Wednesday night. South Carolina Public Radio will provide live coverage of the address including reaction from members of the General Assembly.

Former Sen. Bob Dole will receive the Congressional Gold Medal on Wednesday, in recognition of his service to the nation as a "soldier, legislator and statesman."

He'll be presented the medal by President Trump and bipartisan congressional leaders at a ceremony in the Capitol rotunda. Dole was an early backer of Trump, and the only former GOP presidential nominee to endorse the president.

Would you eat venison if there was a chance it could slowly eat away at your brain?

If there's a slight possibility, it doesn't bother Patrick States. On the menu this evening for his wife and two daughters at their Northglenn, Colo., home are pan-seared venison steaks with mashed potatoes and a whiskey cream sauce.

"We each have our specialty, actually," says States as the steak sizzles. "The girls made elk tamales this morning, but we use [venison or elk] in spaghetti, chili, soup, whatever."

By now, you've likely heard about President Trump's reported remark last week that the U.S. should bring in more people from Norway instead of from "shithole countries" like El Salvador, Haiti and African nations.

The reaction was swift and loud. Citizens (and allies) of those countries filled social media pages with photos of idyllic beaches, city skylines and shiny structures in so-called "shithole countries."

They also shared impressive lists of personal achievements that ended with: "I'm from a #shithole country."

When South Korea hosts the Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang next month, a combined North Korea-South Korea women's hockey team — the countries' first-ever joint team — will attract a lot of attention. So will the sight of athletes from the two Koreas, divided for some 70 years, marching together in the opening ceremony on Feb. 9.

NPR's Leila Fadel covers issues of race and diversity and is based in Las Vegas, where thousands of women are expected this weekend for the anniversary of the Women's March on Sunday.

She wants to hear from you, as she's curious to learn what you think has changed over the past year, and what you're marching for this year.

The State Department is withholding $65 million it planned to send to the U.N. agency for Palestinian refugees, calling for reforms and for other nations to step up their support — especially those that criticize the Trump administration's positions regarding Palestinians and Israel.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Updated at 10 a.m. ET

Michigan residents got a surprise Tuesday night when a meteor punched through the clouds with an explosive flash. It was powerful enough to register on seismic instruments.

The details of how North Korea will participate in the upcoming Winter Olympics in South Korea are still being worked out, but the two countries say their athletes will march together at the opening ceremony, under a unification flag.

The two countries will also form a unified women's hockey team to compete at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics in February, NPR's Elise Hu reports from Seoul. In addition, North Korea will send a cheering squad of 230 people to support athletes who make the trip.

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News and Features from APM and PRI

(Markets Edition) Amid the stock market's very positive run, we'll talk to Susan Schmidt — senior portfolio manager at Westwood Holdings — about the possibility of a correction. Next, we'll look at how China has the capability to influence aluminum prices, and then we'll discuss how the Trump administration plans to revisit a payday lending rule put in place under the Obama administration.

01/17/2018: What's ahead for Republicans in 2018

7 hours ago

(U.S. Edition) The planners of the upcoming Davos conference have a new report on global threats. We'll look at what they're warning against, which includes everything from stock market crashes to little bits of computer intelligence that could infect us. Afterwards, we'll chat with Michael Boskin — senior fellow at the conservative-leaning Council of Economic Advisers  — about what's on the economic agenda for Republicans in the upcoming year. 

As we approach the Trump administration's one-year anniversary, we're looking at the economic agenda ahead. With the Republicans in power, and the passage of their major $1.5 trillion tax overhaul, what's next? Michael Boskin, economics professor and senior fellow at Stanford's Hoover Institution, joined Marketplace Morning Report host David Brancaccio to share his perspective.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … Data this morning showed Japanese companies are finally starting to invest their substantial cash piles, which is helping spur economic growth. While it’s positive news, we’ll explain what risks investors should look out for. Then, the World Economic Forum in Davos might be a week away, but its new report on global risks out this morning has a warning about issues like protectionism amid recently rosy headlines of widespread growth.

What does Martin Luther have to do with Facebook? According to one historian, they both prove that networks have great power and can do a lot of harm. Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood talks with Niall Ferguson, whose new book is called "The Square and the Tower: Networks and Power, from the Freemasons to Facebook."

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