SC Public Radio Features

These Narragansett turkeys are raised by University of South Carolina professor Joe Jones.  Though he keeps his flock small, the quality of the meat is far superior to mass produced turkeys.
Tut Underwood/ SC Public Radio

From 9 to 5, Joe Jones of Blythewood is a professor of marine science and environmental science at the University of South Carolina.  After 5, he becomes a farmer, raising sheep, pigs, chickens, and especially Narragansett turkeys, which makes him popular around Thanksgiving.   He and his wife keep their flock small, preferring quality over quantity.  Jones and his wife Amanda talk in this story about the difference between homegrown birds and the corporate, mass-produced turkeys most people consume (hint: price and flavor have a lot to do with the difference).  There are challenges to rais

Poster for "Eight Days a Week."
Apple Corps

The 2017 Ron Howard documentary film “The Beatles: Eight Days a Week - The Touring Years” highlights the cultural phenomenon of Beatlemania in the 1960s.  The movie captures America’s excitement as John, Paul, George and Ringo stormed the country at the forefront of the most popular musical revolution of the century, the British Invasion.   

The U.S. Navy announced it has ended its search and rescue operations for three missing sailors who disappeared after the crash of a transport plane on Wednesday in the Philippine Sea southeast of Okinawa, Japan.

"The U.S. Navy ceased search and rescue operations at 10:00 a.m. Japan Standard Time on Nov. 24 for three Sailors not immediately recovered after a C-2A Greyhound crashed on the afternoon of Nov. 22," the Navy said in a statement.

When was the last time you picked up a book and really looked at how it was made: the typeface, the feel of the paper, the way the words look on the page? Today, when people can read on their phones, some books never even make it to paper.

Once, bookmaking was an art as refined and distinct as the writing it presents. And in some places, like Larkspur Press in Kentucky, it still is.

The Argentine navy announced evidence Thursday pointing to an explosion occurring near the time and at the location one of its submarines, with 44 crew members aboard, went missing last week.

The news sent families of the crew into tears as they gathered at the Mar del Plata Navy Base, where the sub was originally scheduled to arrive on Monday, the Associated Press reported.

"They haven't come back and they will never come back," said Jesica Gopar, wife of an officer aboard the submarine. "I had a bad feeling about this and now it has been confirmed."

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Thirty-seven years ago, Robert Mugabe helped found a new independent country - Zimbabwe. It was a victory that came after a long struggle between black nationalists and white Rhodesians and years of British colonial rule.

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Not to get personal, but how big is your turkey? Tonight, my family is sitting down to a 20-pounder, which seemed big to me until I learned that the average Turkey is now 31 pounds. That's twice as heavy as the typical turkey was in 1960.

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In the Christmas classic "It's A Wonderful Life," the young hero, George Bailey, is just dying to leave his hometown.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE")

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News and Features from APM and PRI

Macy's flagship store in New York’s Herald Square now requires an online reservation for visits with Santa. "Santa's a popular guy," goes the explanation. Some 250,000 visitors come to Macy's "Santaland" each year, according to the company. Santa visits are a big draw and can translate into big sales for retailers.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

It is now officially holiday shopping season. According to a recent survey, 91 percent of people who said they'd be shopping this holiday weekend are going to do at least some of it online. However, shopping online doesn't mean you can skip all the crowds, online traffic is proving to be an issue for popular retail websites. If you are one of those people that will still go to the mall this holiday season, chances are you will see a line of people waiting to take their picture with Santa Claus. Santa visits are a big draw and can translate into big sales for retailers.

Adnan Abidi/Reuters

Bangladesh and Myanmar will start repatriating refugees in two months, Dhaka said Thursday, as global pressure mounts over a crisis that has forced more than 600,000 Rohingya to flee across the border. 

The United Nations says 620,000 Rohingya have arrived in Bangladesh since August to form the world's largest refugee camp after a military crackdown in Myanmar that Washington has said clearly constitutes "ethnic cleansing."

It’s a rainy and miserable afternoon and, for the last few hours, Chef Yia Vang has been cooking under a flimsy white tent. But he’s not complaining.

“We don’t have much to complain about," he said. "Our parents had to cross the Mekong River to get here. A little rain never really hurt anybody.”

According to the latest holiday shopping survey from Deloitte, 91 percent of the people who said they'd be shopping this holiday weekend are going to do at least some of it online. These online shoppers skip the crowds at the brick-mortar stores, but they still experience delays and frustration when the online retail sites can’t handle the volume of traffic. So, if online retailers know traffic is going to be crazy at  this time of year, why don’t they do more to beef up their sites?

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South Carolina Military and Veterans

Stories about South Carolina veterans, the history of the conflicts in which they served, and those on the home front.

Recovery

Stories of people and communities going about the work of recovery from the floods of 2015.

Piano Jazz

Jazz legend Marian McPartland hosted Piano Jazz for over 30 years. The show continues showcasing the top musicians of all time with broadcasts and podcasts from the archives.
From books to barbecue, from current events to colonial history, Walter Edgar's Journal delves into the arts, culture, history of South Carolina and the American South.
On The South Carolina Business Review, Mike Switzer, focuses on news from the state's business community with interviews of small business owners and business leaders …
How did the piano get its name? Why can’t you "reach" a crescendo? Who invented opera—and why? Answers to countless classical music questions from Miles Hoffman.

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