This Week on Walter Edgar's Journal

S. C. Historical Society: Telling the Stories of All South Carolinians

The South Carolina Historical Society’s headquarters in downtown Charleston, the historic "Fireproof Building," is undergoing a multi-million dollar renovation, adding a new, interactive museum.

State House Week
SC Public Radio

State House Week for Friday, March 23, 2018

Keeping schools safe, and passage of a new state "liquor bill" highlight action at the Statehouse this week.

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The endangered North Atlantic right whale population took a big hit last year with a record number of animals killed by fishing gear entanglements and ship strikes. Now, an ongoing debate over threats posed by Maine's lobster industry is gaining new urgency as scientists estimate these whales could become extinct in just 20 years.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit

Copyright 2018 WBUR. To see more, visit WBUR.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit

The recent revelations that personal data from about 50 million Facebook users were used by a data analytics firm working for the Trump campaign are making a lot of the social network's users uneasy.

Some are wondering if there's a better way to limit who can access their personal information.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit


News and Features from APM and PRI

We dodged another government shutdown

14 hours ago

We avoided a government shutdown today, folks. President Donald Trump signed the $1.3 trillion omnibus spending bill, even after he said he’d veto the bill. Catherine Rampell of The Washington Post and Rachel Abrams of The New York Times join us to talk about this week’s business and economic news. After the budget talk, we switch gears to trade. Trump asked China to reduce the U.S. trade deficit by $100 billion. But perhaps he should be complaining about intellectual property violations instead. We discuss it.

Key health care measure left out of federal spending bill

15 hours ago

Congress jammed a lot into its $1.3 trillion spending bill, and we’ll be going through the bill’s 2,000-plus pages for some time. But there was one thing noticeably left out: a last-ditch compromise amendment on health care sponsored by Republican senators Susan Collins and Lamar Alexander. The so-called “stabilization” package was designed to keep health insurance premiums on the individual market from skyrocketing and would have restored billions of dollars in federal subsidy money for insurance companies that the Trump administration cancelled out last year.

Women and the gig economy: "Every job you have is essentially the last one"

16 hours ago

The "gig economy" is far more than just Uber and Lyft drivers. Those two words can include musicians and graphic designers working one-off jobs, people getting cleaning or delivery work via apps, or people selling goods on sites like Etsy or eBay.

Now schools want school shooting insurance. Seriously.

16 hours ago

Following highly publicized school shootings, schools across the country are sorting out ways to prepare themselves in case tragedy strikes in their own hallways and classrooms. That includes buying insurance for a school shooting. While there's no exact count of the number of schools buying this coverage, insurers say in the past year more schools have been seeking "active shooter" and "active assailant" policies. Suzanne Barlyn, U.S.

How businesses use your Facebook data

16 hours ago

Facebook is unquestionably a giant of social media — the network has over 2 billion monthly active users worldwide. But it's not just baby pictures and relationship status updates.  Facebook is a hub for business. 

Businesses of all sizes use Facebook to cultivate followers, build their brands, engage with their audience and maybe even manage employees. Karen North, professor at USC’s Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, joined Marketplace Weekend to discuss how businesses use Facebook for marketing and data collection.

Narrative captures stories of South Carolina through interviews and personal conversations.

Piano Jazz

Jazz legend Marian McPartland hosted Piano Jazz for over 30 years. The show continues showcasing the top musicians of all time with broadcasts and podcasts from the archives.

Every musician has to start somewhere!

Start by entering the @nprmusic #TinyDeskContest between Feb 20 - Mar 25.

Jazz Night in America

Marian McPartland: A Centennial Celebration

No jazz musician has ever been heard more on public radio than the late Marian McPartland, the host of NPR's Piano Jazz for more than 40 years. But for all her ubiquity, how well did we really know he

South Carolina Public Radio News

State House Week
SC Public Radio

Keeping schools safe, and passage of a new state "liquor bill" highlight action at the Statehouse this week.

A law making its way through the state legislature would require the method of executing death row criminals to default to the electric chair in cases where lethal drugs are unavailable to the state.
Photo courtesy S.C. Department of Corrections.

South Carolina has two methods of executing condemned criminals:  lethal injection and electrocution.  But because convicted prisoners are allowed to choose between them, almost all will choose lethal injection (the last electrocution in the state was in 2008).  This presents a problem, according to Brian Stirling, director of the state Department of Corrections.  The state has run out of the drugs used for lethal injections, and the manufacturers refuse to sell the state more for fear of backlash, because the state has no law to shield the companies’ names from public disclosure.  Thus, i

Firefighter Tries to Save Lives in the Classroom

Mar 21, 2018
Christan Rainey speaks to students at Charleston area middle school.
Victoria Hansen/SC Public Radio

When Christan Rainey isn't putting out flames and saving lives as a North Charleston firefighter, he's busy warning teens about the potential dangers of dating and domestic violence.  The 33 year-old knows such violence all too well.  His mother and four siblings were shot to death 11 years ago, by the man his mother had married.

The landscape of Sesquicentennial State Park was permanently altered by the floods of 2015. Pictured here is standing water that remains from the event.
Olivia Aldridge/SC Public Radio

Between the autumns of 2015 and 2017, 47 of South Carolina’s state parks experienced temporary closures due to damages sustained during severe weather events, including the Floods of 2015, Hurricane Matthew, Hurricane Irma and the Pinnacle Mountain Wildfire at Table Rock State Park. February marked an important milestone: for the first time since the fall of 2015, every affected park was reopened.

More SC Public Radio News

South Carolina Lede

Join host Gavin Jackson each week as we break down state political news and go inside the legislative happenings that could affect you, your family, and your pocketbook.
From books to barbecue, from current events to colonial history, Walter Edgar's Journal delves into the arts, culture, history of South Carolina and the American South.
On The South Carolina Business Review, Mike Switzer, focuses on news from the state's business community with interviews of small business owners and business leaders …

Get weekly program highlights via e-mail.

South Carolina Military and Veterans

Stories about South Carolina veterans, the history of the conflicts in which they served, and those on the home front.

How did the piano get its name? Why can’t you "reach" a crescendo? Who invented opera—and why? Answers to countless classical music questions from Miles Hoffman.


Stories of people and communities going about the work of recovery from the floods of 2015.