Jazz Night in America

Marian McPartland: A Centennial Celebration

No jazz musician has ever been heard more on public radio than the late Marian McPartland, the host of NPR's Piano Jazz for more than 40 years. But for all her ubiquity, how well did we really know he

Senators are grilling top intelligence and election officials Wednesday on Capitol Hill, as they continue to investigate how to better secure voting systems in the U.S.

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Austin Suspect Dies In Explosion, Police Say

1 hour ago

Copyright 2018 KUT 90.5. To see more, visit KUT 90.5.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Investors are expecting another quarter-point increase in interest rates Wednesday afternoon as the Federal Reserve's policymaking committee winds up its first two-day meeting under new Fed Chairman Jerome Powell.

But economists are wondering whether faster economic growth might cause the Fed to pick up the pace of its rate hikes. The Fed has signaled three rate increases for 2018, but accelerated growth could cause policymakers to add an additional hike.

A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

Today is the birthday of Johann Sebastian Bach. The essayist Lewis Thomas, musing on the question of what signals earthlings ought to broadcast to outer space in case alien life forms were listening, wrote, “I would vote for Bach, all of Bach, streamed out into space over and over again. We would be bragging, of course, but it is surely excusable to put on the best possible face at the beginning of such an acquaintance. Any species capable of producing the music of Johann Sebastian Bach cannot be all bad.” 

Welcome to Invisibilia Season 4! The NPR program and podcast explores the invisible forces that shape human behavior, and we here at Goats and Soda are joining in for the podcast's look at how a reality show in Somalia tried to do far more than crown a winning singer. The ultimate goal: to change human behavior.


News and Features from APM and PRI

President Donald Trump's import duties on steel and aluminum take effect Friday. The Europeans have already drawn up their list of retaliatory items. There's serious talk at the White House of extra tariffs on Chinese products and counterthreats to take the United States to the World Trade Organization. It handles commercial disputes among its 164-member nations.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Facebook could use some friends

15 hours ago

Facebook’s leaders are being called on to explain themselves before officials here and in Europe. The Federal Trade Commission is examining whether Cambridge Analytica, the company that improperly siphoned the data of millions of Facebook users to create political profiles, violated a consent agreement. Now, the fact your information is for sale on the internet isn't exactly new, so why is this particular incident really touching a nerve?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Fourteen-hour shifts on a ranch was grueling work. Yet this man, who requested anonymity, loved his job of tending to sick horses on the outskirts of Los Angeles. He adores the animals — he grew up caring for them in Mexico, his home country. His passion for the job shone through, even as he talked about the long hours and back-breaking work.

But this rancher, who is undocumented, is scared. His hands shook as he told his story. He is terrified of immigration officials finding him and deporting him back to Mexico.

54: Protecting speech, protecting students

16 hours ago

Kai and Molly are getting smart about last week's nationwide walkout organized by high school students pushing for stricter gun control. First Amendment expert and lawyer Ken White (also a Twitter personality) lays out the law and history of free speech in schools. We hear from high school students, look back at the landmark case Tinker v. Des Moines and examine how social media platforms have changed the equation.

In the first part of our conversation with Ben Bernanke, Hank Paulson and Tim Geithner yesterday, we talked about how Bear Stearns was saved, at first, by the Fed and JPMorgan. That was 10 years ago this month. Today we'll pick up with another bank that wasn't so lucky: Lehman Brothers.

Narrative captures stories of South Carolina through interviews and personal conversations.

Piano Jazz

Jazz legend Marian McPartland hosted Piano Jazz for over 30 years. The show continues showcasing the top musicians of all time with broadcasts and podcasts from the archives.

South Carolina Lede

Join host Gavin Jackson each week as we break down state political news and go inside the legislative happenings that could affect you, your family, and your pocketbook.

Every musician has to start somewhere!

Start by entering the @nprmusic #TinyDeskContest between Feb 20 - Mar 25.

From books to barbecue, from current events to colonial history, Walter Edgar's Journal delves into the arts, culture, history of South Carolina and the American South.
On The South Carolina Business Review, Mike Switzer, focuses on news from the state's business community with interviews of small business owners and business leaders …

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South Carolina Military and Veterans

Stories about South Carolina veterans, the history of the conflicts in which they served, and those on the home front.

How did the piano get its name? Why can’t you "reach" a crescendo? Who invented opera—and why? Answers to countless classical music questions from Miles Hoffman.


Stories of people and communities going about the work of recovery from the floods of 2015.