State House Week
SC Public Radio

State House Week for March 16, 2018

The S.C. House of Representatives approves next year's $8 Billion state budget package, and gun safety measures advance in the State Senate.

Read More

ProPublica is retracting parts of its story that linked Gina Haspel, President Trump's choice to lead the CIA, with the waterboarding of Abu Zubaydah, a suspected al-Qaida leader who was held at a secret "black site" prison in Thailand in 2002. The investigative newsroom cited new clarifications from CIA insiders as the reason for its correction. It also issued an apology.

From ProPublica:

"We at ProPublica hold government officials responsible for their missteps, and we must be equally accountable.

USC/Thomas Cooper Library

(Originally broadcast 12/08/17) - In spite of a growing movement for journalistic neutrality in reporting the news of the 20th century, journalists enlisted on both sides of the mid-century struggle for civil rights. Indeed, against all odds, the seeds of social change found purchase in South Carolina with newspaperman John McCray and his allies at the Lighthouse and Informer, who challenged readers to "rebel and fight"--to reject the "slavery of thought and action" and become "progressive fighters" for equality.

Updated at 1:21 p.m. ET

Rep. Louise Slaughter, D-N.Y., a glass-ceiling-shattering leader in Congress, died Friday at age 88, while serving her 16th term in the House of Representatives, her chief of staff said in a statement.

She was surrounded by family at George Washington University Hospital at the time of her death, after sustaining an injury at her Washington, D.C., home last week.

Abortions in the United States are safe and have few complications, according to a landmark new study by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine.

The report, called "The Safety and Quality of Abortion Care in the United States," examined the four major methods used for abortions — medication, aspiration, dilation and evacuation, and induction — and examined women's care from before they had the procedure through their follow-up care.

Is the Trump administration retaliating against activists that criticize its harsh immigration policies?

Immigrant advocates across the country and the American Civil Liberties Union assert that federal immigration agents are increasingly targeting activists who oppose them, help undocumented immigrants, and are quoted in the media.

Activists across the country say they are being targeted by federal immigration authorities for speaking out at protests and accusing the government of heavy-handed tactics.

The Trump administration has warned that anyone in the country illegally could be arrested and deported under tough new enforcement rules. And federal officials deny allegations of retaliation.

But the American Civil Liberties Union and other groups say they have documented two dozen cases of immigrant activists and volunteers who say they have been arrested or face fines for their work.

The teachers strike in West Virginia may have ended last week when Gov. Jim Justice signed a law giving educators a 5 percent pay increase, but the fight in other states is just warming up.

"You can make anywhere from $5,000 to $20,000 more by driving 15 minutes across the state line," said Dale Lee, president of the West Virginia Education Association. "We're having trouble keeping and attracting young teachers."

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Consequences of Racism.

About Adam Foss's TED Talk

Former prosecutor Adam Foss lays out the damaging effects an arrest, a criminal record, and a prison sentence can have on marginalized individuals. He argues prosecutors can be at the helm of reform.

About Adam Foss

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Consequences of Racism.

About Dena Simmons's TED Talk

When Bronx-native Dena Simmons received a scholarship to attend a majority white boarding school, she felt like an imposter. Simmons suggests ways students of color can be made to feel more accepted.

About Dena Simmons

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Consequences of Racism.

About Miriam Zoila Pérez's TED Talk

Why do pregnant women of color have different health outcomes from their white counterparts? Writer and activist Miriam Zoila Pérez explains the ways racism manifests for these women and their babies.

About Miriam Zoila Pérez


News and Features from APM and PRI

After Hurricane Maria, some good news for Puerto Rico

10 hours ago

Six months ago, Hurricane Maria made landfall in Puerto Rico. According to the official death toll, 64 people lost their lives, but other counts put the total closer to 1,000. The storm also knocked out power and destroyed homes. Thousands of people left the island but others stayed. Michelle Rodriguez is one of them. She's the executive director of Niños De Nueva Esperanza in the neighborhood of Sabana Seca, 15 miles outside San Juan. Marketplace Weekend's Lizzie O'Leary met with Rodriguez during a reporting trip to the island in November.

The CEO of the last company in the U.S. making beer kegs out of American steel says new steel tariffs may come with unintended consequences for his business.

Health care in the United States costs a lot of money. In fact, we, as a country, spend twice as much as other wealthy nations. And we're collectively less healthy than many others. But why is it like this? Conventional wisdom says that Americans use more health care — more tests, scans, screenings and prescriptions. But a group of researchers has some new information that doesn't fit into the old theories. Dr.

Ten years ago, Bear Stearns went under as the financial crisis was breaking. Ana Swanson of The New York Times and Sheelah Kolhatkar from The New Yorker share their most vivid memories of that time with us. We also get a taste of Kai Ryssdal's interview with Tim Geithner, Henry Paulson and Ben Bernanke, airing on the show starting Monday. "We were using duct tape and string to try to hold the thing together," Geithner said of the economy. It's part of our Divided Decade project.

Russian voters go the polls on March 18 to choose a president, but there’s not much to truly decide. 

Vladimir Putin will win his fourth term after 18 years in power. But behind the scenes of an election with a foregone conclusion — an event that should be drama-free — a more complicated picture emerges. 

For Putin, the real concern is not winning but the optics of how the race is won.  Turnout — getting enough people out to vote to make this victory feel like a mandate — is key to giving his fourth term a legitimacy the Kremlin clearly craves. 

Narrative captures stories of South Carolina through interviews and personal conversations.

Piano Jazz

Jazz legend Marian McPartland hosted Piano Jazz for over 30 years. The show continues showcasing the top musicians of all time with broadcasts and podcasts from the archives.

Every musician has to start somewhere!

Start by entering the @nprmusic #TinyDeskContest between Feb 20 - Mar 25.

From books to barbecue, from current events to colonial history, Walter Edgar's Journal delves into the arts, culture, history of South Carolina and the American South.
On The South Carolina Business Review, Mike Switzer, focuses on news from the state's business community with interviews of small business owners and business leaders …

Get weekly program highlights via e-mail.

South Carolina Military and Veterans

Stories about South Carolina veterans, the history of the conflicts in which they served, and those on the home front.

How did the piano get its name? Why can’t you "reach" a crescendo? Who invented opera—and why? Answers to countless classical music questions from Miles Hoffman.


Stories of people and communities going about the work of recovery from the floods of 2015.