South Carolina Public Radio News

Future drill sergeants practice their techniques on their fellow trainees at Fort Jackson. (File)
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

A new study finds South Carolina among ten states with a larger number of unfit Army recruits compared to the rest of the nation. The research comes from the Citadel, a military school in Charleston, and shows potential soldiers who are not physically fit are more likely to be injured during basic training, costing the Department of Defense and putting our nation's military readiness at risk.

State House Week
SC Public Radio

State lawmakers returned to Columbia this week for the 2018 session of the S.C. General Assembly. Fallout from last summer's collapse of the V.C. Nuclear is expected to dominate this year's session.  Also, this week the House of Representatives wasted little time in overriding Gov. Henry McMaster's veto of some $20 million dollars for new school buses.

Epworth Children's Home in Columbia will soon make available to the public a treat that its residents and visitors have enjoyed for decades: peanut butter ice cream, which has been produced at the home since the Great Depression.
Photo courtesy Riggs Partners, West Columbia, S.C.

For decades, Epworth Children's Home in Columbia has been well known in Methodist circles for two things: caring for children, and the unique dessert it has produced since the Great Depression: peanut butter ice cream.  The government sent the home large quantities of peanut butter to help give the children protein, and the cooks served it in every way they could think of, said Epworth President John Holler.   In those days, the home had a dairy, so someone suggested  trying to make ice cream with it. 

Host Gavin Jackson discusses the upcoming 2018 South Carolina Legislative Session with The Post and Courier's Columbia Bureau Chief, Andy Shain.

Topics include the VC Summer nuclear situation, ethics reform, and more!

Close-up of gas nozzle refueling car.
Andreas [CC0 1.0] via Pixabay

A new gasoline tax credit that takes effect this year will give  South Carolina drivers a little relief from the cost of driving.  The tax credit can be filed for beginning in January 2019 for the 2018 tax year.  This credit is to help offset the annual 2-cent-per- gallon increase in the gasoline tax to be dedicated to road upkeep for the next five years (for a total of six years, or an eventual 12-cents per gallon).  SC Dept.

More SC Public Radio News
This week: Tim Conroy “is a theologian of the best kind, a theologian of the ordinary,” writes poet Ed Madden. “He knows…we have to learn to live the best we can here, now."

This post was last updated at 7 p.m. ET.

An attacker wearing an Afghan military uniform opened fire at service members of the NATO-led coalition in Afghanistan on Tuesday, killing a U.S. major general.

The officer's family has been notified of his death; his name is Harold Greene.

Army Chief of Staff Gen. Ray Odierno issued a note of condolence, saying of Greene and others caught by the attack, "These soldiers were professionals, committed to the mission. It is their service and sacrifice that define us as an Army."

Following an industry trend, Gannett announced on Tuesday that it intends to split its company in two. One half will handle the newspapers and the other its broadcasting and digital operations.

The AP reports:

When Kids Start Playing To Win

Aug 5, 2014

This week, NPR Ed is focusing on questions about why people play and how play relates to learning.

It's a playful word that's developed something of a bad reputation: "competition." The fear among some parents is that, once children start playing to win, at around 5 years old, losing isn't just hard. It's devastating.

After nearly a month of fighting, a negotiated, three-day peace has taken hold in Gaza.

As NPR's Emily Harris reports, Israel has also ordered all of its troops out of Gaza. But this may not mean the end of the current conflict, because the Israel Defense Forces said its troops would maintain a defensive position and respond to any attacks.

Case in point: By morning just before the truce started, Emily said she heard rocket fire out of Gaza. But things have calmed down and the AP reports that in Gaza "traffic picked up and shops started opening doors."

Carmen Smith remembers the day about a year ago when she gained Medicaid coverage.

"It was like Christmas Day, it was like getting a gift from Santa Claus!" she says. "People don't realize how important and how special it is to have insurance to be able to go see a doctor on a regular basis when you have an illness like mine."

Smith, 44, has Type 2 diabetes. Before qualifying for Medicaid coverage, she was what policy experts call a "frequent flier." She had used the emergency room at MetroHealth, the public hospital in Cleveland, five times in one year.

Like it or not, television has the power to shape our perceptions of the world. So what do sitcoms, dramas and reality TV say about poor people?

In life and on TV, "poor" is relative. Take breakfast: For Honey Boo Boo's family, it's microwaved sausage and pancake sandwiches; for children in The Wire's Baltimore ghetto, it's a juice box and a bag of chips before school; and on Good Times, set in the Chicago projects back in the 1970s, it was a healthier choice: oatmeal.

A senior minister in the British government's foreign office tendered her resignation on Tuesday, protesting what she said was the U.K. government's "morally indefensible" position on the conflict in Gaza.

Sayeeda Warsi, a baroness with a seat in the House of Lords who became the first Muslim member of the prime minister's cabinet, is opposed to Britain's strong support of Israel.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit


Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit


Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit


This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Now it's time for Faith Matters. That's another part of the program that listeners have told us they very much appreciate. That's where we talk about matters of faith, religion and spirituality.


News and Features from APM and PRI

Dion Rabouin from Yahoo Finance and Kate Davidson from The Wall Street Journal join us to talk about this week’s economic and business news. This week, Walmart announced it's giving 1 million employees bonuses and wage raises, Fiat-Chrysler announced it will be relocating a plant in Mexico to Michigan and the IRS announced new rules that would give tax payers a bigger paycheck. All of these wins, however were overshadowed by President Donald Trump’s comments about El Salvador, Haiti and some African countries.

Can the Olympics be protected from cyberattacks?

19 hours ago

As athletes gear up for the Olympics, hackers are working hard, too. An unidentified hacker group tried to take over dozens of computers involved with the upcoming games. While hackers are getting craftier, digital protections for everyone involved in the Olympics need to get more complex and expensive. To take us through it all, Molly Wood, host of Marketplace Tech, joined Marketplace Weekend for a discussion about what happened in South Korea, how Olympics organizers build their own internet and just who's on the hook for protecting it.

5 things you need to know about HQ Trivia

19 hours ago

You’ve seen people around your office suddenly intensely staring at their phone around noon Pacific Time/3 p.m. Eastern Time, there’s a good chance they are on an app called HQ Trivia. And if you haven’t seen someone play, you’ve probably heard about it on Twitter.

HQ is an free app that hosts a live trivia game show typically twice a day. HQ sends a notification out when it is game time, then thousands of players log on at the same time to compete against each other for the jackpot. Here are five things you need to know:

It’s a start up

The Consumer Price Index rose 0.1 percent in December from the previous month. The “core” inflation rate — excluding volatile food and energy prices — rose 0.3 percent month-to-month. That’s the largest increase since January 2017, and was higher than economists expected. But does it mean we’re beginning to see a serious uptick in inflation? 

 Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

01/12/2018: Here's the thing about this week

21 hours ago

This week could have been an economic messaging home run for the White House and congressional Republicans. The tax law's kicking it, companies are giving bonuses and raises, some raises anyway. But no. We'll talk about it. Then: T. Boone Pickens announced today he's hanging it up. He's pretty much the stereotype of the big-time oil man, with his Oklahoma-Texas drawl. He made more than a billion dollars in the energy industry and ran a hedge fund, too. We'll talk about his legacy. Plus: Facebook hasn't had the best week, and it capped it off with changes to the News Feed.

Narrative captures stories of South Carolina through interviews and personal conversations.

Piano Jazz

Jazz legend Marian McPartland hosted Piano Jazz for over 30 years. The show continues showcasing the top musicians of all time with broadcasts and podcasts from the archives.
On The South Carolina Business Review, Mike Switzer, focuses on news from the state's business community with interviews of small business owners and business leaders …

Get weekly program highlights via e-mail.

South Carolina Military and Veterans

Stories about South Carolina veterans, the history of the conflicts in which they served, and those on the home front.

How did the piano get its name? Why can’t you "reach" a crescendo? Who invented opera—and why? Answers to countless classical music questions from Miles Hoffman.

S.C. Public Radio Offers HD Programming in Charleston

Both Classical and News Programming Available.


Stories of people and communities going about the work of recovery from the floods of 2015.