Narrative

All Stations: Tue, 7:45 am; Wed, 5:44 pm | News Stations: Thu, 9:30 am | Classical Stations: Thu, 9:30 am

  Narrative captures stories of South Carolina through interviews and personal conversations. Begun as an initiative to document the accounts of people recovering from the historic floods that hit the state in October 2015, Narrative explores various themes—from ongoing disaster recovery to the state’s military history, to the journeys of individuals and communities working to better understand issues of race, ethnicity and identity, to the personal struggles and triumphs of those who call South Carolina home.

Narrative is recorded by South Carolina Public Radio and also uses selections recorded separately by StoryCorps for the station. If you have a story to share for Narrative, email news@scpublicradio.org. We are currently seeking stories from people affected by the 2015 floods or Hurricane Matthew and from military personnel and families.

Narrative can be heard Tuesdays at 7:45 a.m. and Wednesdays at 5:44 p.m. on all stations, Thursdays at 9:30 a.m. (News Stations) and 2:30 p.m. (Classical Stations). 

Ways to Connect

Clair DeLune and Benjamin Franklin V, USC professors and authors
StoryCorps

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, a unique oral history project that collects the voices of our times. Recently two local authors and professors at USC, Benjamin Franklin V and Clair DeLune, sat down to talk about their lifelong passions for music.

Chip and Robin Harriford, at the StoryCorps booth, Columbia, 2016.
StoryCorps

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, an oral history project where friends and loved ones interview each other. Here Robin Harriford asks her husband Chip to talk about his childhood and his father, Willie Lloyd Harriford Jr.

Narrative: Living with Mixed Connective Tissue Disorder

Apr 10, 2017
Meredith Robb and Felix Lopez, at the StoryCorps booth in Columbia 2016.
StoryCorps

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, an oral history project based on the idea that the stories of everyday people are the most important and interesting of all. Recently, Meredith Robb shared her story with Felix Lopez at the StoryCorps mobile booth in Columbia.

Narrative: If Milk Sold for $20 a Gallon...

Apr 3, 2017
photo of two adults, a daughter and a father
StoryCorps

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, an oral history project where friends and loved ones interview each other. Here, Ashley Faulkenberry talks with her dad, Larry Faukenberry, about his childhood in Kershaw.

Narrative: A Real-Life "Meet-Cute" with a WWII Soldier

Mar 27, 2017
Photo of two women, Carol and Helen Antman.
StoryCorps

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, an oral history project where friends and loved ones interview each other. In 2012, Carol Antman came to StoryCorps mobile booth in Charleston with her mother-in-law, Helen Antman, who was 96 at the time of taping. Here, Carol asks Helen about her memories of World War II.

Helen Antman currently lives in the Charleston area, close to her children, grand- and great-grandchildren. She turns 101 this April 18th.

Lynda O'Bryon
SCETV

In 1971, Linda O'Bryon started her first broadcast journalism job. During a recent Story Corp conversation in Columbia, O'Bryon talked about the barriers that blocked many paths for women, during that time.

In this edition of Narrative, O'Bryon (now President and CEO of SC ETV and SC Public Radio) shares how her career included opportunities to break some of those barriers. 

How a Conversation With Warren Buffett Led to A Memorable Story

Narrative: Love Letters from a Soldier in World War One

Mar 17, 2017
Weathered envelope to Caroline Reese, postmarked November 25, 1918.
Wilson McElveen

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, a unique oral history project that collects the voices of our times. In 2012, Wilson McElveen went to the StoryCorps mobile booth in Charleston to share letters written to his grandmother, Caroline Wardlaw Reese, during World War One.  Her boyfriend at the time, a young man named Augustus Jerome Beck, enrolled in the army in Columbia 1918 and wrote to her throughout his time serving in Europe.

Here, Wilson McElveen shares a selection of letters from Jerome Beck.

Cokie Roberts, Author and political commentator
Thelisha Eaddy/SC Public Radio

Cokie Roberts is an author and political commentator for ABC News and NPR. Recently, she spent time at two Columbia-area schools to share her new book with students. In Ladies of Liberty, The Women Who Shaped Our Nation, Roberts uses the letters and journals of women to give another perspective of what was happening during the early years of the nation. 

In this edition of Narrative, Roberts shares how she selected the women featured in her book.

Narrative: Sharing in an Aunt's Historic Medical Career

Feb 28, 2017
Left: Juliette Satterwhite, Right: Maude Callen
Courtesy of Juliette Satterwhite

When Juliette Satterwhite was a young girl, she spent many Sunday afternoons in rural Berkeley County at her aunt Maude Callen's house in Pineville, South Carolina. These family gatherings introduced Satterwhite to the medical work Callen provided to people in the area. In December of 1951, Life magazine published a 12-page photo essay of Callen and work she did. She is credited with delivering some 800 babies. Callen's story is also featured in the new National Museum of African-American History and Culture in Washington, DC.

Sitting at a restaurant on Two-Notch Road in Columbia, I.S. Leevy Johnson, along with family and friends, waited to hear election results. The year was 1970 and later that night, the group celebrated as Leevy Johnson was elected to the state's General Assembly. He, along with two other African-American men, became the first to serve in that office since the end of Reconstruction.

In this edition of Narrative, the Columbia attorney talks about the community effort that helped him win and ultimately add to South Carolina history.

James Felder during his Narrarive interview at SC Public Radio
Thelisha Eaddy/ SC Public Radio

In 1967 James Felder had recently returned to South Carolina to run the Voter Education Project.  In the span of a few years, Felder helped register thousands of black South Carolinians to vote. In 1970 those votes proved to be beneficial for him and two other African Americans. That year Felder, along with I. S. Leevy Johnson and Herbert Fielding, became the first African-Americans voted to the state’s general assembly since Reconstruction. In this edition of Narrative, Dr. James Felder talks about traveling the state to register people to vote.

Columbia Mayor Steve Benjamin with daughters Bethany and Jordan Grace
StoryCorps

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, an oral history project where friends and loved ones interview each other. Recently City of Columbia Mayor Steve Benjamin was interviewed by his daughters Bethany and Jordan Grace.

StoryCorps

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, a unique oral history project that collects the voices of our times. 96-year-old Sarah Leverette graduated from USC’s Law School in 1943, one of the first women to attend. Here, Leverette tells her friend Lisa Wilcox about her experience breaking down barriers to practice law.

StoryCorps

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, a project that collects the stories of everyday people to create an oral history of America. Recently, Columbia resident Al Black interviewed his friend Jean Williams about her life growing up and living in the South and how she first became aware of racial injustice. Here, Black asks Williams to share a moment that opened her eyes to racism and prejudice.

Narrative: A Grandfather's Army Career

Dec 21, 2016
StoryCorps

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, a unique oral history project that collects the voices of our times. Here, eight-year-old Jack Paolucci asks his grandfather Colonel John Paolucci about his time in the army.

Narrative: Family Rescued by Boat from Historic Floods

Dec 21, 2016
StoryCorps

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, an oral history project based on the idea that the stories of everyday people are the most important and interesting of all. Recently, Columbia resident Beki Gettys and her eleven-year-old son Eli sat down to talk about the 2015 floods.

When Highfill assisted in volunteer efforts to aid flood recovery in rural Williamsburg county, he and other volunteers coordinated with county officials to provide water, food, and sanitation kits to flood victims.
Credit: Charles Highfill.

Charles Highfill has long been an avid HAM radio operator, and has assisted in volunteer emergency weather response in that role for many years. During the flood of October 2015, Charles assisted in water rescues and in communicating road safety conditions to state agencies. Several weeks after the flood, he helped to coordinate assistance for flood victims in rural Williamsburg County. Ironically, Charles himself has received little help since his home was condemned due to flood damage.

Harriet Mealing is planning to move into a house soon, but is waiting until she has the financial ability to furnish it with appliances.
Olivia Aldridge/SC Public Radio

Harriet Mealing's trailer home was severely damaged by the flood. Ceilings caved in, holes opened in the floor and mold and mildew ruined most of Harriet's belongings. She sought help from a myriad of flood recovery organizations, but received very little assistance, and she received no financial support from FEMA. Over a year later, Harriet is still living in the same situation, resigned to Clorox her home every week to keep the mold at bay. 

Tammy Moshier stands in her living room with nametags she made for the guests of her "Gratitude Party." Each one bears a description of what the wearer did to help her and her daughter during their struggle with the flood.
Courtesy of Laura Moshier

Tammy Moshier and her twelve-year-old daughter, Laura, were flooded out of their home near Gill's Creek in October 2015. Because their home was elevated six feet, they had assumed they would be safe from flooding, but they were wrong. It was a stranger that escorted the mother-daughter pair from their front porch and carried Laura through shoulder-deep water. They never knew his name.

Narrative: "It's Like Starting All Over Again"

Oct 25, 2016
Margaret and Harry Plexico spent months trying to clean up and salvage their flooded home before decided to start over elsewhere.
Ryan Plexico

Margaret and Harry Plexico were away celebrating their anniversary the weekend of October 4th, 2016. They couple celebrated 36 years of marriage in Charleston. When they returned to their home in Irmo, they found it ravaged by flood. With no flood insurance, the Plexicos made the difficult choice to build a new home elsewhere, using their retirement savings to do so. Both Margaret and Harry had just retired.

City of Columbia Police Officers Erskin Moody (left) and Ivan Birochak.
Jennifer Timmons/City of Columbia Police Department

Sergeant Erskine Moody and Officer Ivan Birochak of the Columbia Police Department were assigned to a twelve hour night shift on October 3 and 4, 2015. They wondered whether the forecasted rain would "live up to the hype," and soon realized that it would. From managing barricades to saving families from their homes, a normal shift quickly became one to remember. 

  In 2015, Tomeka Frazier and her young son were living with her former foster mother and searching for affordable housing of their own. Then the October flood came, and housing became intensely competitive as displaced flood victims searched for a place to stay. On top of losing most of their belongings in the flood, the Fraziers were forced to leave the city of Columbia to find somewhere to live. Tomeka describes her fight to find stability for her and her son after the flood as a disabled single parent.

Maegan Latham assists with community cleanup efforts after Columbia was flooded last October. Here, she takes a wooden cross to her neighbors houses to be signed.
Courtesy Julie Latham

  Last October, the Latham family’s home was devastatingly damaged by Columbia’s massive flood. During several long months of repair, Davis and Maegan Latham struggled to keep up with the demands of high school while living in “less than ideal” circumstances, displaced from their home at an inconvenient distance. In the process, the two siblings learned lessons about resilience and carrying on in the midst of unfortunate events.

State Director of the Humane Society Kim Kelly with a member of their Animal Rescue Team and one of the dogs relocated from Charleston Animal Society before flooding began,
Courtesy of Kim Kelly

Last October, South Carolina State Director of the Human Society Kim Kelly worked with her organization on a state and national level to evacuate animal shelters likely to flood, relocating nearly 300 animals. However, at the same time, Kelly's home in Johns Island was seriously flooded, and she and her family were forced to evacuate their own home as well.

Elizabeth Webb and Louise Cruea both experienced two flood evacuations with their respective children, pictured here.
Elizabeth Webb

        Elizabeth Webb and Louise Cruea survived South Carolina's flood last October before surviving a second massive flood in West Virginia this summer. Their children, who were with them in both evacuations, have struggled with trauma from these disasters, like so many of the elementary-age children that Elizabeth and Louise teach.

Louise Cruea (left) and Elizabeth Webb took refuge in West Virginia after Webb's Lake Katherine area home was flooded in October, 2015. Then, in June, they found themselves victims of that state's record-breaking floods.
Olivia Aldridge/SC Public Radio

  Elizabeth Webb and Louise Cruea both experienced South Carolina’s “thousand-year flood” firsthand. Last October, both women and their families were evacuated from their Lake Katherine homes as the rain bore down on Columbia. They believed that they had lived through an once-in-a-lifetime disaster, but when Webb and Cruea went with their children to stay at a family home in White Sulfur Springs, West Virginia, they were caught once again in a devastating flood.

Narrative: When Saviors Came by Boat

Aug 16, 2016
Marwan Marzagao and other men in his neighborhood used pontoon boats like these to navigate the water and deliver neighbors to safety.
Marwan Marzagao

  In the neighborhoods surrounding Lake Katherine, one of the most heavily flooded areas in Columbia last October, locals went from house to house on Jon boats and pontoons to rescue neighbors who were trapped in their flooded homes. Marwan Marzagao recalls working as a team with other men as they saved others from harm’s way.

Rachel Larratt stands among the wreckage in her community after the flood of October 4, 2015.
Courtesy of Rachel Larratt

In the South Beltline and Gills Creek area of Columbia, many homes were extensively damaged by last October's flood. Rachel Larratt, a survivor turned volunteer from this area, reflects on the water rising in her own home, as well as the deflated spirits of other survivors who are still struggling to recover from the disaster. 

Narrative: While the Rain Poured, Wedding Bells Rang

Aug 1, 2016
Blair and Hal Lindsey outside their wedding reception venue on Senate street in Columbia, while the rains of the beginning stages of the flood poured around them.
Amy Jo Photography

    On Friday, October 2, 2015, Blair Minick listened heartbroken to the next day’s weather forecast. On Saturday, she was supposed to marry her fiancé, Hal Lindsey, by the Saluda River. As the rain began to fall, all of her carefully laid plans seemed doomed to fall through, but in fact the flood only proved Blair and Hal’s commitment to one another.

Jeremy and Lacie Cannon in their family’s Turbeville farmhouse.
Cooper McKim/SC Public Radio

  A fourth generation farmer, Jeremy Cannon was always confident in what his family’s future held. But when October’s flood decimated many of his crops, the Cannons’ future was suddenly called into question. In this episode of Narrative, Jeremy and his wife Lacie reflect on the struggle for their business pull through the loss of their crops in 2015.

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