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"O" is for Oliphant, Mary Chevillette Simms [1891-1988]. Historian. Born in Barnwell County, Mary C. Simms Oliphant was the granddaughter of novelist and historian William Gilmore Simms. In 1917 the state superintendent of education asked her to update her grandfather's history for use as a textbook. It was adopted and revised every five years until 1932 when Oliphant wrote her own school text, The Simms History of South Carolina—which went through nine editions and was used in the state's schools until 1985.

"J" is for Johns Island Presbyterian Church. The Johns Island Presbyterian Church is one of the oldest Presbyterian congregations in South Carolina. Scots minister Archibald Stobo founded the congregation in 1710.The first church, of cypress siding and shingles, was erected in 1719 and remodeled in 1792. In 1822-1823, it was replaced by the present structure—a fine example of wood churches of the Federal period. It bears many similarities to contemporary Episcopal churches, including clear glass windows with semi-circular windows above.

SC Hall of Fame: Col. Charles M. Duke

Oct 10, 2017
Charles M. Duke, Jr.
NASA

On April 20, 1972, Colonel Duke joined the select body of Americans who walked on the surface of the moon. Colonel Duke was born in Charlotte, North Carolina, grew up and graduated from high school in Lancaster, South Carolina. He graduated from the United States Naval Academy in 1957 and was commissioned in the U. S. Air Force. In 1966 NASA selected him for the astronaut program. Colonel Duke was the lunar module pilot for Apollo 16 (April 16-27, 1972). Apollo 16 collected a record 210 pounds of lunar rock and soil samples that provided a wealth of new information for scientists.

SC Hall of Fame: Col. Peter Horry (1743-1815)

Oct 10, 2017
A photograph of a South Carolina historical marker about the Battle of Black Mingo Creek.
LKeiner [CC BY 3.0] via Wikimedia

Peter Horry (1743-1815) was a planter from Georgetown County, South Carolina, who became a politician and leader during the American Revolutionary War. He served at the Battle of Fort Moultrie in 1776 and fought alongside Gen. Francis Marion later in the war. Horry is buried In the churchyard of Trinity Episcopal Church in Columbia.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"N" is for National Guard. The South Carolina National Guard evolved out of the state’s militia. In 1905 the organized militia was renamed the South Carolina National Guard and in 1916 all state militias were converted into a national reserve force.  Guardsmen were activated for the campaign along the Mexican border in 1916. During World War I, most guardsmen were used as replacement personnel. In 1940, the first guard units were federalized and by February 1941 the entire force had been mobilized. Following the war, the Guard was reorganized and gained an air arm, the Air National Guard.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"I" is for Isle of Palms [Charleston County; population 4,583]. For all but the last one hundred years, the Isle of Palms was uninhabited. Its palmetto jungles abounded in game and its first name was "Hunting Island" because coastal Indians hunted there. In the early 18th century, pirates called it "Long Island." In 1898, the island began its modern transformation when a local company constructed a beachside resort with a boardwalk, amusement park, bathhouse, and dance pavilion. Renamed the Isle of Palms, the resort was connected to Charleston by ferry and an interurban railway.

"M" is for Malaria

Oct 9, 2017
South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"M" is for Malaria. Malaria was arguably the most significant disease in the history of South Carolina from the colonial period until the early 20th century. It is a parasitic infection caused by protozoa known as plasmodia and transmitted by anopheles mosquitoes. There are two types of disease: one introduced with European settlers in the 1670s and a more virulent form that came with the importation of large numbers of West Africans in the 18th century.  During the 19th century malaria became a major health problem in much of the state, especially along river valleys.

"H" is for Happyville

Oct 9, 2017
South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"H" is for Happyville. Happyville was a short-lived agricultural colony settled in 1905 near Montmorenci in Aiken County by Jewish immigrants from Russia. The state established an immigration bureau that published a brochure in Yiddish and German described the state as "the Garden Country of America." Jewish New Yorkers thought it would be an opportunity to help Russian Jews escape persecution.

John Slaughter, Superintendent of US Park Service's Southern Campaign of the American Revolution Parks group.
John Slaughter, Superintendent of US Park Service's Southern Campaign of the American Revolution Parks group. / SCETV/Original SC

The Southern Campaign was critical in determining the outcome of the American Revolutionary War, yet the South’s importance has been downplayed in most historical accounts to date.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for St. Mark's Parish. In the 1730s lowcountry planters began moving inland and petitioned to have the inland area separated into a new entity—Prince Frederick Parish. Beginning in 1750, an influx of new settlers from Pennsylvania and Virginia moved into Prince Frederick and soon the frontiersmen outvoted the lowcountry planters. In 1757, St. Mark's, the colony’s first—and largest-- backcountry parish was created as much to protect established lowcountry interests as to promote those of the emerging backcountry.

South Carolina From A to Z
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"R" is for Ravenel, Harriott Horry Rutledge [1832-1912]. Novelist. Biographer. Historian. A Charleston native, Harriott Horry Rutledge attended Madame Talvande's female academy. She married St. Julien Ravenel and had nine children. Though she wrote poetry, essays, and stories on a variety of subjects, her major works focused on Southern history and manners. Her most successful novel was Ashurst: or "The Days That Are Not," which fondly depicted antebellum lifestyles and landscapes.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"P" is for the Paper and pulpwood industry. The first paper mill in South Carolina was operating in Columbia by 1806. Over the next fifty years, other mills opened including the Bath Paper Mill near Edgefield. By 1893 James Lide Coker of Hartsville had organized the first company in the state to make wood pulp for paper production on a commercial scale. That mill evolved into SONOCO. By the middle of the 1930s, with the arrival of WESTVACO in Charleston County and International Paper in Georgetown, paper manufacturing assumed an important place in the state's economy.

South Carolina From A to Z
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"O" is for Operation Lost Trust. Operation Lost Trust was arguably South Carolina's largest and longest-running political scandal. The key player in the FBI's investigation into legislative corruption was Ron Cobb, a lobbyist and former member of the S.C. House of Representatives. After being arrested by the FBI on a drug charge, he cooperated with them and told legislators he represented a group seeking support for legalizing dog- and horse-track betting in the state.

South Carolina From A to Z
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"N" is for New Ellenton [Aiken County; population 2,250]. Initially called North Ellenton prior to its incorporation, New Ellenton was an offspring of the Cold War and considered by many locals to have been "the first victim of the H-bomb." Incorporated in 1952, the town was the reincarnation of the town of Ellenton—a depot on the Port Royal Railroad.

Sep 6, 2014: The 750-ton Wilkins house was moved a few blocks from Augusta Street to Mills Avenue in Greenville, SC.
Courtesy of Preservation SC

The Palmetto Trust for Historic Preservation is now Preservation South Carolina. The non-profit, statewide organization is a partner of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, and has been operating in South Carolina since 1990. Executive Director Michael Bedenbaugh talks about Preservation South Carolina’s latest efforts to "protect and preserve the irreplaceable architectural heritage of South Carolina."

All Stations: Fri, Oct 06, 12 pm | News & Talk Stations: Sun, Oct 08, 4 pm

"E" is for Erskine College. In 1836 the General Synod of the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church organized an academy in Due West. A professor of divinity was added the next year and the institution was incorporated as Clark and Erskine Seminary. With more faculty added in 1839, it became the first four-year denominational college in the state. About 1843 the name was shortened to Erskine College and the theological seminary became an adjunct of the college. The school took its name from the 18th century Scottish theologian and reformer, Ebenezer Erskine.

"D" is for Donaldson Air Base. Early in World War II, the US Army Air Corps leased more than two thousand acres of land from the city and county of Greenville to construct what was then known as the Greenville Army Air Base, with barracks, hangers, and related buildings to train B-25 crews. The base was deactivated at the end of the war, but in 1946 was reconstituted as the headquarters of the nation’s Troop Carrier Command [later called the Military Air Transport Command]. Its planes played roles in the 1948 Berlin Airlift and during the crisis in the Belgian Congo a decade later.

"C" is for Chapin, Sarah Flournoy Moore [ca. 1830-1896]. Temperance leader; social reformer. Known as Sallie F. Chapin, she became one of South Carolina's most visible 19th century women leaders. During the Civil War, she served as president of the Soldier’s Relief Society and after the war as leader of the Ladies Christian Association. In 1880 she organized the first local chapter of the Women's Christian Temperance Union in South Carolina in Charleston.

"B" is for Berkeley County [1,098 sq. miles; population 142,651]. Created on May 10, 1682, Berkeley was one of South Carolina's first three counties. It was named for two of the Lords Proprietors, Lord John Berkeley Sir William Berkeley. At that time Charleston served as the county’s seat of justice. Over the next two centuries the boundaries and organization of the Berkeley County area underwent several alterations. With the abolishment of the parish system in 1865, Berkeley became part of Charleston County.

"B" is for the Bank of the State of South Carolina. The General Assembly chartered the Bank of the State of South Carolina in 1812—giving it the power to circulate currency and to act as the fiscal agent of the state. The main branch was located in Charleston, but by 1860 there were branches in Abbeville, Camden, Columbia, and Georgetown; the bank also had business agents in global financial centers such as New York and Liverpool.

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