SC Features

Interviews, profiles, and and informational programming about the Palmetto State.

Orders in hand, Navy Capt. Marc A. Mitscher, skipper of the USS Hornet (CV-8) chats with Lt. Col. James Doolittle, leader of the Army Air Forces attack group. This group of fliers carried the battle of the Pacific to the heart of the Japanese empire.
U.S. Navy

75 years ago, on April 18 1942, 80 brave men did what had never been attempted: they flew army bombers off a U.S. aircraft carrier on their way to bomb Tokyo.  The attack, which has become known to history as the Doolittle Raid, was America’s first strike back at Japan after the infamous sneak attack on Pearl Harbor that brought the United States into World War II.  In this report, Mount Pleasant author James Scott talks about the significance of the raid to the war, and its great psychological effect both on the American and Japanese publics. 

(April 21, 1972) Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., Lunar Module pilot of the Apollo 16 mission, is photographed collecting lunar samples at Station no. 1 during the first Apollo 16 extravehicular activity at the Descartes landing site.
NASA

On April 16, 1972, with the deafening blast of a Saturn V rocket, the Apollo 16 mission carried three Americans to the moon.   Five days later, Charles M. Duke Jr. of Lancaster, South Carolina became the 10th man of only 12 in history to walk on the surface of the moon.   In this report Duke, a retired Air Force general, talks about his historic mission, including the difficulties of landing and the advances in science made because of the space program, as well as his role as communications liason on the Apollo 11 mission, which put the first men on the moon.  

Chip and Robin Harriford, at the StoryCorps booth, Columbia, 2016.
StoryCorps

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, an oral history project where friends and loved ones interview each other. Here Robin Harriford asks her husband Chip to talk about his childhood and his father, Willie Lloyd Harriford Jr.

Golf club next to golf ball.
[CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Golf is an economic juggernaut for the South Carolina, accounting for a $3 billion economic impact on the state.  A large part of that will be felt in one week; the week between the Master’s and the Heritage golf tournaments.  Duane Parrish, director of the S.C. Dept.

Tim Tebow at a Columbia Fireflies press conference.
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

Former Heisman Trophy winner and NFL quarterback Tim Tebow has taken on a new challenge: breaking into baseball at age 29.  Signed to the New York Mets organization, Tebow has begun working his way through the minor league ranks beginning in South Carolina’s capital city.  Tebow has been assigned to the single A Columbia Fireflies, and the fans have turned out in large numbers.  Hopes are not only that Tebow will be an asset on the field, but the Fireflies’ president and a University of South Carolina sports management professor predict he will have a positive economic impact on the team a

Narrative: Living with Mixed Connective Tissue Disorder

Apr 10, 2017
Meredith Robb and Felix Lopez, at the StoryCorps booth in Columbia 2016.
StoryCorps

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, an oral history project based on the idea that the stories of everyday people are the most important and interesting of all. Recently, Meredith Robb shared her story with Felix Lopez at the StoryCorps mobile booth in Columbia.

Charleston School of Law student Tyler Gilliam rehearses his tax argument with Prof. Kristin Gutting as his partner Anna Boning looks on.  Gutting coached the students to the school's sixth consecutive tax moot court national championship.
Tut Underwood/ SC Public Radio

For a law student, winning a national moot court championship is like winning the Super Bowl.  And Charleston School of Law students recently did it an astounding six times in a row.  Teams of students argue cases in front of judges to simulate situations in a real courtroom – in this case,  it was tax law, though other disciplines of law have their own moot courts.  This year’s winners, Anna Boning and Tyler Gilliam,  have the distinction of being the first team to repeat the feat, and win the competition for the second time. 

This drone is ready to fly.  Drones have many applications ,but the law hasn't caught up with some of them yet.
Tut Underwood/ SC Public Radio

Drones are becoming more and more common, with possibly a million or more sold in 2015.  As recreation, they’ve been used as an extension of the traditional model airplane.  Newer uses in business, government and other enterprises have seen them used for traffic monitoring, inspecting farm crops and even collecting information from whale spray.  In this report, law professor Bryant Smith talks about legal concerns brought about by the use of drones, and oceanographer George Voulgaris and graduate student Doug Cahl discuss the drone’s role in various areas of research.

Narrative: If Milk Sold for $20 a Gallon...

Apr 3, 2017
photo of two adults, a daughter and a father
StoryCorps

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, an oral history project where friends and loved ones interview each other. Here, Ashley Faulkenberry talks with her dad, Larry Faukenberry, about his childhood in Kershaw.

Narrative: Love Letters from a Soldier in World War One

Mar 17, 2017
Weathered envelope to Caroline Reese, postmarked November 25, 1918.
Wilson McElveen

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, a unique oral history project that collects the voices of our times. In 2012, Wilson McElveen went to the StoryCorps mobile booth in Charleston to share letters written to his grandmother, Caroline Wardlaw Reese, during World War One.  Her boyfriend at the time, a young man named Augustus Jerome Beck, enrolled in the army in Columbia 1918 and wrote to her throughout his time serving in Europe.

Here, Wilson McElveen shares a selection of letters from Jerome Beck.

Edvard Tchivzhel, conductor of Greenville Symphony Orchestra.
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

    Live classical music is widely available in the Palmetto State, thanks to orchestras in at least seven South Carolina cities. But even the same music can be approached differently by different orchestras and conductors. 

Cokie Roberts, Author and political commentator
Thelisha Eaddy/SC Public Radio

Cokie Roberts is an author and political commentator for ABC News and NPR. Recently, she spent time at two Columbia-area schools to share her new book with students. In Ladies of Liberty, The Women Who Shaped Our Nation, Roberts uses the letters and journals of women to give another perspective of what was happening during the early years of the nation. 

In this edition of Narrative, Roberts shares how she selected the women featured in her book.

A volunteer's transport van bears the slogan MAMAS on the Move.
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

Many stray dogs from South Carolina are finding homes in other states thanks to Bamberg’s Mary Ann Morris Animal Society, also known as MAMAS.  The no-kill animal shelter has developed a transport system that shuttles dogs to willing owners by way of a “pipeline” of volunteers that relay the animals from North Carolina to Maine and Vermont.  The dedicated volunteers talk about their devotion to saving these pets for new owners who are excited to give them loving homes, and keep in touch with MAMAS to update staff on the lives of dogs they’ve rescued. 

Narrative: Sharing in an Aunt's Historic Medical Career

Feb 28, 2017
Left: Juliette Satterwhite, Right: Maude Callen
Courtesy of Juliette Satterwhite

When Juliette Satterwhite was a young girl, she spent many Sunday afternoons in rural Berkeley County at her aunt Maude Callen's house in Pineville, South Carolina. These family gatherings introduced Satterwhite to the medical work Callen provided to people in the area. In December of 1951, Life magazine published a 12-page photo essay of Callen and work she did. She is credited with delivering some 800 babies. Callen's story is also featured in the new National Museum of African-American History and Culture in Washington, DC.

Sitting at a restaurant on Two-Notch Road in Columbia, I.S. Leevy Johnson, along with family and friends, waited to hear election results. The year was 1970 and later that night, the group celebrated as Leevy Johnson was elected to the state's General Assembly. He, along with two other African-American men, became the first to serve in that office since the end of Reconstruction.

In this edition of Narrative, the Columbia attorney talks about the community effort that helped him win and ultimately add to South Carolina history.

Game Offers Unique Therapy for Stroke Rehabilitation

Feb 21, 2017
Occupational Therapist Michelle Woodbury uses a game to enhance therapy sessions with stroke patients.
Taylor Crouch

In order to meet the needs of her patients, an occupational therapist at the Medical University of South Carolina teamed up with technical experts from Clemson to create tool to engage patients in the clinic and at home. Through a virtual therapy session, patients can play a game to meet their therapy goals, different than traditional care.

Mopeds at Hawg Scooters, Rosewood Drive, Columbia. 2.	More South Carolinians are riding mopeds, and there are numerous reasons why.
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

On any day in any college town across the state a multitude of students can be seen negotiating the streets on mopeds. But they are by no means the only riders. The use of these low-power scooters is exploding across South Carolina, and the nation. Today we talk with two dealers who explain the phenomenon, as well as a rider who tells of the advantages he gets from his moped.

James Felder during his Narrarive interview at SC Public Radio
Thelisha Eaddy/ SC Public Radio

In 1967 James Felder had recently returned to South Carolina to run the Voter Education Project.  In the span of a few years, Felder helped register thousands of black South Carolinians to vote. In 1970 those votes proved to be beneficial for him and two other African Americans. That year Felder, along with I. S. Leevy Johnson and Herbert Fielding, became the first African-Americans voted to the state’s general assembly since Reconstruction. In this edition of Narrative, Dr. James Felder talks about traveling the state to register people to vote.

Columbia Mayor Steve Benjamin with daughters Bethany and Jordan Grace
StoryCorps

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, an oral history project where friends and loved ones interview each other. Recently City of Columbia Mayor Steve Benjamin was interviewed by his daughters Bethany and Jordan Grace.

StoryCorps

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, a unique oral history project that collects the voices of our times. 96-year-old Sarah Leverette graduated from USC’s Law School in 1943, one of the first women to attend. Here, Leverette tells her friend Lisa Wilcox about her experience breaking down barriers to practice law.

Mr. and Mrs. Mark Cain sign their wedding certificate before friends at the Columbia Fireflies ball park.
Tut Underwood/ SC Public Radio

A recent wedding at the home of the Columbia Fireflies minor league baseball team would seem unusual to most people, but to a group of University of South Carolina students, it’s just part of a class.  The wedding planning class is included in the curriculum of the Hotel, Restaurant and Tourism Management program, and for at least a decade has had the dual advantage of giving students experience in all the details that go into planning a wedding and providing the bride and groom with a free wedding and honeymoon.  The catch?  They must give the students total control over everything.  But s

StoryCorps

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, a project that collects the stories of everyday people to create an oral history of America. Recently, Columbia resident Al Black interviewed his friend Jean Williams about her life growing up and living in the South and how she first became aware of racial injustice. Here, Black asks Williams to share a moment that opened her eyes to racism and prejudice.

"B" is for Baldwin, William Plews, III [born 1944]. Novelist. Born in McClellandville, Baldwin was reared in the Carolina lowcountry. He is a “would-be” architect with two degrees from Clemson—one in history and the other in English. After college, he returned to McClellanville where he has made a living by crabbing, oystering, shrimping,  serving as a magistrate, writing screenplays for Hollywood, and writing fiction. His first novel, The Hard to Catch Mercy [1993] was universally well-received.

A member of the Greatest Generation Columbia's Moffatt Burriss recalls his World War II experiences.
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

  Moffatt Burris of Columbia is one of the heroes who helped save the world from tyranny during World War II. He fought to liberate Sicily and at Anzio to free Italy. But perhaps his most memorable exploits came as a paratrooper who participated in Operation Market Garden, a failed attempt to hasten the end of the war with a massive jump into Holland.

As recruits train at Fort Jackson, their weapons stand at the ready.
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

As the army’s largest basic training post, Fort Jackson is a vital part of the nation’s defense. Today’s story looks at the approaching centennial of the fort, begun in 1917 in response to the need to train soldiers for World War I. Historians Henry Howe and Fritz Hamer comment on the fort’s beginnings as Camp Jackson, how it was built and its impact on the Midlands economy, as well as its prospects for the future.

Narrative: A Grandfather's Army Career

Dec 21, 2016
StoryCorps

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, a unique oral history project that collects the voices of our times. Here, eight-year-old Jack Paolucci asks his grandfather Colonel John Paolucci about his time in the army.

Narrative: Family Rescued by Boat from Historic Floods

Dec 21, 2016
StoryCorps

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, an oral history project based on the idea that the stories of everyday people are the most important and interesting of all. Recently, Columbia resident Beki Gettys and her eleven-year-old son Eli sat down to talk about the 2015 floods.

  Local theater is found both in quantity and quality throughout South Carolina. Today we hear from representatives of two of them: Columbia’s Town Theater is the oldest continually operating community theater in America, and will turn 100 in 2019. It specializes in musicals, but presents other known plays as well. Across town, Trustus Theater employs professionals to bring audiences new productions that sometimes “push the envelope.” These and many other theaters across the state help their cities both economically, drawing tourism, and, of course, enrich them culturally as well.

Fort Jackson VolunTEENS Serve in the Midlands

Dec 19, 2016
Mary Reardon

VolunTEENS is school-year programs connecting students with the Red Cross. Based in the Fort Jackson community, the group promotes the Red Cross mission through service projects, such as supporting the South Carolina Special Olympics, public education initiatives about health or fire safety, and disaster recovery. For example, their November event was to help the Red Cross clean, inspect, and pack away the cots used in the shelters during Hurricane Matthew. After the October floods in 2015, the VolunTEENS came out for multiple days of service in the Midlands.

Scam detector Frank Abagnale with the medallions he has received from organizations he has coached or helped to prevent or detect fraud.
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

     Charleston resident Frank Abagnale has helped the FBI and numerous government agencies and corporations detect and stop fraud for more than 40 years. His expertise in the field comes largely from the fact that between the ages of 16 to 21, Abagnale was himself a scam artist and check forger, whose international exploits are recounted in his book “Catch Me if you Can,” and a major motion picture of the same name.

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