2017 Solar Eclipse

On August 21, 2017, millions of people across the United States will see a total eclipse of the Sun. South Carolina will be a significant destination for the eclipse because it will be the nearest spot within the path of totality for at least 100 million Americans in the Atlantic Seaboard and Florida.

Cell phone service and smartphone Internet are expected to be unavailable inside the path of totality due to the large concentration of people. Cell phone companies will reinforce their network capacity for emergency responders. However, this will not increase capacity for commercial use. Visitors to South Carolina for the eclipse are encouraged to print paper versions of directions, lodging and restaurant reservations, and tickets to local eclipse events they plan to attend.

Ways to Connect

Making History with a Total Solar Eclipse

Aug 21, 2017
Recently identified photo of scientist, academics and dignitaries gathered to witness the May 28, 1900 solar eclipse in Winnsboro, SC.
Photo Courtesy of Fairfield County Museum and Historical Society

Today residents and visitors in South Carolina will witness a total solar eclipse, a rare phenomenon that hasn't been seen in the state since March 7, 1970 and won't occur again in the United States until 2024.

Eclipse!

Aug 21, 2017
The path of the August 21, 2017, total solar eclipse.
scemd.org/TotalEclipse

A total solar eclipse, visible in South Carolina, is an opportunity to study the sun.

NPR Live Blog -- Total Solar Eclipse Crosses The U.S.

Aug 21, 2017
On Nov. 13, 2012, a narrow corridor in the southern hemisphere experienced a total solar eclipse. The corridor lay mostly over the ocean but also cut across the northern tip of Australia where both professional and amateur astronomers gathered to watch.
Courtesy of Romeo Durscher/NASA

This blog will go live Monday, August 21, at 10 am ET and will run until approximately 3 pm ET. (The eclipse itself is slated to begin in the U.S. around 1:16 pm ET and end about 2:48 pm ET.)

It is indeed dark during the day as a total solar eclipse makes its way from Oregon to South Carolina. Eleven states are in the path of total darkness. Follow the astronomical phenomenon's journey across America along with NPR journalists and others experiencing the eclipse.

The Magic And Mythology Of The Solar Eclipse

Aug 18, 2017

Eclipse mania sweeps the nation. We’ll dig into the science, the history, the culture, and the folklore of the astronomical phenomenon.

Doctors are warning spectators not to look directly at the sun without protection during Monday’s eclipse. It can cause permanent damage like solar retinopathy or blindness, especially for people outside the path of totality.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks with Dr. Nhung H. Brandenburg, president of the Georgia Optometric Association, about how to view the eclipse safely.

Pages